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Saturday
July 4th 1846
This Morning we heard the
firing of the guns at
Matamoras in celebration of the
aniversary of American Indipen
dence. At 4 oclock we met at
the Governer Hendersen's tent where
Genl [?] after a few prelimina
ry remarks read the declaration
of Independence. Doctor Ashbel
Smith
followed with a very good
speech When done Wm Scurry was
called on unanimously and made
a very beautifull and flowery oration
amid the acclimations of the audience
Mr [?] of Virginia was then
called on and delivered a short
oration when the meeting was
dismissed. Capt Green presided.
Today we have a fine breeze, but for
several days it had been very hot.
We have had 8 or 10 new recruits
in our company in the last few days
This evening we had volunters sing
and speeches with which
we spent the evening
very pleasantly.
July 9th 1846
Went to Point Isabel for the purpose of
procuring Leon a [convey?] and to [Galveston?]
for being sick and the Surgeon advises his
return home. There being no
[steamers?] in I failed in procuring

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San Jac Descendant

On this page my first cousin James Pinkney Henderson is mentioned, and although he was elected Governor of Texas in 1845, he asked permission of the Texas Legislature to take personal command of the Texans who volunteered in the Mexican War. He was appointed Major General of Texas Volunteers.

San Jac Descendant

William Read Scurry was a lawyer, district attorney, legislature, and soldier that served in the Mexican-American War, and the American Civil War. Scurry was killed at the Battle of Jenkins' Ferry on April 30, 1864. This same battle took the life of my 2nd great grand-uncle Capt. Richard Patrick (shot in the head.)

San Jac Descendant

Ashbel Smith was a pioneer physician, diplomat and official of the Republic of Texas, Confederate officer and first President of the Board of Regents of the University of Texas.

San Jac Descendant

Thomas Green was a lawyer, politician, soldier and officer of the Republic of Texas, and rose to the rank of Brigadier General of the Confederacy during the American Civil War. On April 12, 1864, Green was mortally wounded by a shell from a Federal gunboat while leading an attack on the gunboats patrolling the Red River at Blair's Landing.