Civil War and Reconstruction Governors of Alabama

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Shorter_correspondence_RSG00689_Q145250_Q145648

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78 76 Proclamation Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama, April 1st, 1862 Whereas it has been made known to this Department ^that^ the Farmer's Bank of Alabama, a Bank lately organized under the free-banking ^system^ of this State & located in the City of Montgomery - has fully complied with the provisions contained in the Proviso to the first section of "an act to authorize the several Banks therein named to suspend specie-payments," approved Nov 30 1861.

Now, therefore, I, John Gill Shorter, Governor of the State of Alabama, do, hereby, declare - and make known to all whom it may concern - that said bank is entitled to all the privileges and immunities, conferred by law, upon the Bank of Montgomery - or the Bank of Selma, and the privileges and immuspecified in the Act above-mentioned.

[Locus Sigilli] In testimony whereof - I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the great Seal of the State to be affixed, at the City of Montgomery, this first day of April, A. D. 1862. and of the Independence of the Confederate States of America, The Second year. (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter - By the Governor, (Segned) P. H. Brittan, Secretary of State. c

Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama, April 1st, 1862 To his Excellency - John Milton, Governor of Florida. Sir, The Legislature of Alabama, at its last Session, enacted several laws for the encouragement of the manufacture of Salt in the State; and, in pursuance of them, contracts have been made - for that purpose. It soon became apparent to me that the Saline Springs in the State - even if worked to the greatest advantage, would not furnish a supply sufficient to meet the wants of the people, and our small extent of Coast - closely watched by the blockading fleet of the Enemy - offered no secure shelter for the erection of Works for that purpose. I am inclined to think that Salt-works might be located upon the Coast of West-Florida - at a point remote from the ordinary points of Visitation by the Enemy, where salt might be manufactured, with comparative safety. I therefore, invited the formation of a Company to manufacture Salt, exclusively, for the use of the State of Alabama, at such a place on the Coast of West-Florida, as might be deemed most suitable, by those engaging in in the Enterprise, after a careful examination. A prerequisite to the organization of this Company will - of course - be the consent of your Excellency to certain conditions, necessary for the success of the undertaking. These would be - to state them briefly - The exclusive use and control of a certain area of the public lands of Floida - with the right to use the timber thereon for the manufacture of Salt, until the raising of the blockade. This usufruct would be entirely subsidiary to the rights of the State - and the parties engaged - subject to her laws. These privileges would be necessary to secure the Company from molestation, or the intrusion of unauthorized persons upon the reserve temporarily appropriated to their use.

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77 79 they would desire - at the termination of the blockade, to remove only such things - carried there by them - or as were ^not^ attached to the Freehold, needful in manufacturing Salt. The Company would be semi-Military in its organization, for the purpose of self-protection, and might thus, become a great service to Florida, in certain emergencies.

While this Company will manufacture Salt - exclusively for the State of Alabama, and not for the benefit of those composing it - the result of its sucessful operation will be, indirectly, beneficial to the Entire Country - by increasing the supply, and thus diminishing - in a corresponding ratio, the cost of an article so necessary to life.

In view of the necessities of this State, cut-off- as it is - from every available means of supply, - except the insufficient one derived from a few Saline Springs - I hope the proposition will meet with your concurrence - and co-operation.

Hoping to hear from your Excellency, at the easliest moment - on this subject -

I have the honour to be, Sir Your ob't Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter c

Executive Department. Montgomery, Alabama, March 26th 1862 Hon. S. R. Mallory, Secy of Navy, C. S. A. Sir I, Henry Dent, 3d Ass't Engineer in the naval service of the Confederate States, desires to be transferred from the Confederate States' Steamer McCree - off Tipton Tennessee to the Gun-Boat Florida now at Mobile. I would respectfully recommend to your Department, that he be so transferred - if not incompatible with the interest of the public service. Very respectfully, Your ob't Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter.

Executive Department. Montgomery, Alabama, March 31st 1862 Capt. James A. Clendenin Dear Sir, The supply of Salt to the People of Alabama, is one of grave importance, and I address you, to suggest the propriety of forming a Company of patriotic Citizens, to engage in the manufacture of Salt - on a liberal scale - upon the Coast of Florida - with the Consent - and upon terms agreeable to - the Governor and authorities of that State.

I would be glad to encourage such a company, by a liberal advance from the State - payable in Salt - all of which I would contract to purchase for the State, upon such terms as shall afford handsome compensation for their enterprize & risk.

So soon as you can examine into the matter and ascertain that a company or organization can be found to go to work, with a fair prospect of success, I shall be pleased to hear from you. Very Respectfully, Yours (Signed) John Gill Shorter. c

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80 78 Executive Department. Montgomery, Alabama, April 1st, 1862 Messrs J. Frazer & Co. Charleston, So. Ca. Gentlemen, I am informed that you have recd a large importation of Cotton Cards. There is a great need of them, in this State, and I beg to appeal to you, to allow me to purchase as many as you can spare - to be distributed, at convenient points, for sale among the People of Alabama, for family use.

Of course the Cards would be furnished to the people, at a uniform price, and that would be simply "cost & charges" paid by the State. Hoping to hear from you - at an early day, I am, dear Sirs, Very respectfully, Your ob't Ser't. (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

Executive Department. Montgomery, Alabama, April 2d 1862. Genl Duff C. Greene, Q. Mr. Genl Mobile. Sir, In reply to your letter of 29th ult. the Governor directs me to inform you, that your action - for the repair and completion of of arms for service is approved; and he hopes that the work may be pushed forward with Vigor. Very respectfully, Your ob't Ser't. (Signed) Jas S. Albright, Private Secretary c

Executive Department. Montgomery, Alabama, April 3d 1862 Capt. J. H. Butt, A. A. A. General, Darenton, Florida Sir, I am, this moment, in receipt of your letter of 1st inst. & hasten to reply. The companies which were hurried-off to Pensacola, were not expected, by me, to organize into Regiments - there, unless agreeable to them. Patriotically consenting to Go, at once - upon a pressing emergency, it would not be just to them to deprive them of the same right to enter into agreeable organizations of Regiments, secured to other Companies in Camp, within the State. In thus organizing the Regiments, I have deemed it proper to allow the Companies, where they can do so - without public detriment, - to fuse together - as they may prefer. Besides - in my interview with Brigr Genl- (now Maj-Genl T. Jones) at Pensacola, on the 6th March, it was mutually agreed that any War-Companies which I should hurry-down to Pensacola, should not be debarred the rights of organizing into Regiments, upon the same terms which might be conceded to all the other Companies. This right - I must - allow them to exercise, and therefore, the companies there, will be allowed to join the Regiments they may prefer; but I have notified them - distinctly - that they will not be permitted to leave Pensacola, until I had a full Regiment - or more - of War-Troops - ready to go-down and occupy their places. The fact is, I hoped at least 10 Companies would fuse - and form a Regiment there but now, I fear, they will not. There are so many office-hunters - who are interrupting rapid organization, that I am kept constantly annoyed. The Dispatch you speak of from Col. Hilliard, was wholly unauthorized. Say to my esteemed friend, Col. Jones that - while I regret I cannot fuse the Companies there, I will not remove them or weaken his force, untill I am ready - at the same time, to give him other troops. If necessa[ry] to complete my organization up the Country - into which Companies - with you - will ultimately merge - they will be allowed to vote down there, but will not be moved until every thing is ready. Knowing the importance of standing firmly by the position, I shall do every thing in my power to strengthen - and not weaken it; and you may assure Col. Jones, that, having the highest appreciation of his skill and energy, I am ready to respond to any call, within my ability, which he make upon me.

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79 81 I have, now a Six-pounder brass-piece - with Carriage & Limber - the one you will remember - which was at Eufaula - which I will send-down to Col Jones, if he desires it. Arrangements are, now, completed here, for casting this arm, and, if Col. Jones has sent - or will send - up the material to Capt. Wagner, he can have it cast. Very truly, yours (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

Executive Department. Montgomery, Alabama, April 2d 1862 Col. L. V. B. Martin, Tuscaloosa, My dear Sir, When I first received your letter of the 18th Ultimo - I had not, finally, agreed-upon terms for Salt-petre manufacture, with Messrs Carlisle & Henderson, & they have, not yet, sent down their bond.

On yesterday - a week ago - I was taken-down with an attack of fever, and have not been able to attend to business, until, Yesterday. To-day I went up to the Capitol. I hardly know - now - what to write you. The amount of advance you propose, is out of my power to make, viz $55.000. If you establish the powder-mill, I will, however, contract to buy & advance $25.000, to be repaid in powder, at the price paid by the Confederate Government or I might be able to make it $10.000or $15.000, more, if I could get the Confederate Government to take any surplus. The Salt-Petre from Santa Cave - I could receive, on paying cash for it, on delivery at Larkinsville, every fortnight; but I tell you frankly - that the exposure of the works there to depredations from the Enemy may after a few months - render the supply of Salt-Petre, unsustain. If the enemy should reach the Rail-Road, and cut-of the transportation, the supply might cease. And if the Enemy reached the Rail-Road, it is probable he would take possession of the Works, and close them up. These are considerations - which you should not overlook in making up your estimates for obtaining Salt-Petre. As to sulphur - I am informed that the Company - mining for Sulphur, in Talladega Co. have contracted to deliver all they can make, to the Confederate government,

The difficulty - or want, as I told you when here, is not the absence of powder-mills - but the want of the materials, out of which to make the powder. The mill at Augusta, I am told, can manufacture all the material to be had. Still - as an Alabamin I shall be gratified to see a mill established in our own State; and would take the responsibility to aid the Enterprize further than the limited appropriation made by the Legislature would justify., and yet - as a personal friend to you, I deemed-it my duty to tell you, frankly, the condition of things as they are; and the uncertainties of the future. Of course, no bond or Contract can be drawn-up, untill all the preliminaries are fully understood & settled. Very truly yours (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

Executive Department. Montgomery, Alabama, April 2d 1862. Maj. J. Gorgas, Ordnance Department, Richd Sir, I have before me, your letter of the 28th ulto. making certain enquiries concerning the Ala. Arms-Manufacturing Company. This company is incorporated, under the laws of this State; and it is composed of a number of very enterprizing, & wealthy gentlemen. They have just organized - and, I presume, it will take some time for them to turn-out arms finished & complete according to Army-regulations. The length of time will depend upon the success they meet with - in obtaining the necessary tools. The Armory is to be - by Contract with the State - a permanent establishment, and the Company are aided by a loan of $250.000. by the State - to be repaid in the first arms made. The Company are deserving of all confidence and Patronage of both State - &

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82 80 Confederate Governments; and I should be glad to know that the Confederate Government has dealt liberally with them, in encouraging an Enterprize - so important, & likely to be so successfully conducted. Very respectfully, Your ob't Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

Executive Department. Montgomery, Alabama, April 3d 1862. Capt. Jno F. Whitfield, commanding "Jno Gill Shorter Artillery." Madrid-Bend, Tennessee. Sir, I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your esteemed favor, of the 24th Ultimo, advising me that the members of the Company, which you have the Honor to command, have, unanimously, named their organization in compliment to myself.

This manifestation of kind remembrance & partiality, though undeserved - by your patriotic men, impresses me with gratitude; and I beg to tender, through you, to the officers and men of the "Jno Gill Shorter-Artillery" my profound thanks, for the distinction which they have - thus - conferred upon me.

The glorious "First-Alabama Regiment" to which your Command has been attached, is destined to win - even brighter Laurels in the bloody Drama which is now being enacted; and I doubt not, that your command will contribute its full share to make the "First Alabama" more illustrious in the future that it has been in the Past.

With my earnest prayers for the Safety - efficiency - and happy return of your Command, when Victory shall have crowned our arms, and my thanks to you, personally, for the flattering tone of your communication. I have the Honor to be Your friend & ob't Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

Executive Department. Montgomery, Alabama, April 4th 1862 To Gen. Saml Jones, Commanding at Mobile, &c. General, In order to promote the manufacture of Salt - an article so highly important to the people of Alabama, and our army every where, throughout the Confederate States, I have promised - as Governor of Alabama, to the "Alabama-Salt manufacturing Company," a corporate body - recently organized, within this State, for that purpose, that they shall be put & maintained in quiet possession of any part of the Coast of Alabama, either on the Bay of Mobile, or the Gulf of Mexico, which they may select for the establishment of Salt-works; and so much there-of as may be necessary & proper for the successful prosecution of the manufacture of Salt.

This is to request of you that, if it shall be necessary to exert military force, in any manner, to accomplish the object above-set forth, that you will furnish, to said "Alabama-Salt-manufacturing Company," and their agents, & servants, all the aid, assistance & protection which they may require - for that purpose, namely, to take & maintain quiet posssession of any part of the Bay - or Gulf-coasts, which may be necessary for the successful manufacture of Salt. Very respectfully, Your ob't Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

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83 Executive Department Montgomery, Alabama, April 5th 1862. Genl G.W. Randolph, Secretary of War, C.S.A. Richmond. Dear Sir,

I consider the maintenance of the possession of Pensacola a matter of such prime importance, not only to Alabama and Florida, but to the cause at large, that I must claim your attention to a few thoughts and suggestions upon the subject.

Pensacola is - next to Norfolk, the most important point on our entire seabord, to hold, at this time. To us, as a possession - it may not be of any great importance; but to the Yankee Government, its importance, in view of their manifest designs is incalculable. They want a spacious & safe Harbour, far South, for their vast naval armament. Here they may have it. It is the only one in the Gulf - to which their large ships can find access. When they get it - there is the spacious bay to ride-in - the navy - Land to repair-at - the fine Hospital - and other appointments, which cost the old Government millions of Dollars - the extensive fortifications - all ready to their hands.

But again: they Cannot summer at New-Orleans - nor Mobile - nor nor Savannah - nor Charleston. The Yellow-Fever will be a terror to them, and repel them. But at Pensacola, they can make safe & pleasant summer-quarters. The healthfulness of the place has been tested by time and experience - and is established; and the Yankees, who have already spent one summer at Pickard, will feel every confidence in making Pensacola-summer-quarters. No other peace on the southern Coast, with a roadsted for ships, can compare with it, for such a purpose. Put these two great facts together, & it is needless to elaborate an argument. They speak for themselves. I will not weary you - nor myself - by amplifying. This great and important point can be securely held with 5000 men, properly armed & trained, against any force the Yankee Govt can detach. for its capture; perhaps by loss, but-certainly - by 5000 men. But we are now ill-provided, & if provision be not made - and that soon our, comparatively, naked condition will be known to the invaders, they will make a stroke at us, and take us, as I fear, almost without a shew of resistance

Let me state to you, plainly, what is neeeded to put the place in Condition of defence. ¶ 1st. We want a good Brigadier Genl some man who will inspire Confidence - & effect speedy organization. The gallant and worthy Col. - who now Commands the post - himself - feels this want. ¶ 2d. We want small-arms for nearly half the troops now there - about thirty two hundred - & we need, permanently, at the post, 5000 small-arms. ¶ 3d We want one or two artillery Companies - & several Companies of Cavalry. [1 word illegible]. ¶ Alabama is doing all she can; and she will, readily, furnish the men if she can have the effective co-operation of the C.S.A. I have this suggestion to make - for both present & future operations - in respect to Pensacola. Being a Point of so great importance, a healthy location, and accessible for stores and provisions, let it be made a Camp of Instruction for the Confederate service. Send new Regiments or Companies, as they are formed, to Pensacola - for drill. When sufficiently trained - retire them where they may be needed, and bring-in others; keeping the complement at 4000 or 5000 men. In this way the Post can be maintained, and the new levies of Alabama - and adjoining states furnished with a most Eligible Camp of instruction. PI do not wish to seem importunate, but, feeling persuaded - as I do - that 5.000 men could now hold safely - I hope I will be excused for any seeming importunity. From Pensacola, in the hand of the Enemy, the whole great producing-Country of middle Alabama - can be so menaced, as to put a serious check to ordinary agricultural

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84 82 labor, at little or no cost to the Invader. With Kentucky - Tennessee, and parts of North Carolina & Virginia & South-Carolina, lost to us, what are we to do for fppd, if Middle-Alabama is seriously disturbed? I remain, with very great respect, (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. P. S. If the Secretary will furnish arms, I will furnish 5000 Wartroops for the post without delay, with the troops already there, included. (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

Executive Department. Montgomery, Alabama, April 4th, 1862. Col. Wm M. Byrd, Selma, Sir, I am, just this moment, in receipt of your favor of 2d inst. Sorry you have had any difficulty; Volunteers are hard to control. I had purposely avoided this department up-on any pers-onal complications with gentlemen, hower patriotic their purposes. I yield, however to none, in my deep anxiety - and resolute purpose - to advance the Common Cause.

Mr Hardy tendered a company, of 90-day Volunteers, from Dallas and Bibb. I had called-for them from these Counties. It was my duty to accept them. It was not in my power - if I were so disposed - to control the Volunteers as to the Companies they go in. The first Company they join is entitled to hold them.

I sent no dispatch to Mr Hardy, except the one accepting his Company - that I remember. In reply to Col. Harrison's letter, I telegraphed him, that Dallas Co. would be credited with every Volunteer - for 90 days - who left it; and it is immaterial what Company they go in - so far as the credit is concerned. Is not this right? Should the County not be thus credited? It would be unjust to the County to with-hold such credit. The Col. can't make a Volunteer Company. If the men volunteered & organized - by electing officers, every man, participating in the Election, is bound to the Company - unless, before that, he had bound himself - in a similar way, to some other Company; and if thus bound - he is subject to the order of his Captain. If Hardy's Company was not organized at the time yours was, then any who had promised to join him, who united with your company and participated in its organization, by by voting for officers, would in my opinion, belong to your Command could not, afterwards without your consent.

I hope you may yet fill-up your Company - but if you cannot - I will accept it, under the circumstances, with the men you have - and you can proceed to Mobile, at once. Truly yours (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

Executive Department. Montgomery, Alabama, April 7th 1862 Hon G. W. Randolph, Secretary of War. Richd Sir One of my aids - in organizing a Regiment of Volunteers, under the call upon this State, for twelve-Regiments - for three years or the War, found several persons, in one Company, who had been twelve-months Volunteers in the 5th Regiment of Alabama Volunteers and had re-enlisted, and were absent on Furlough.

Those Volunteers shewed, to my aid, a letter from the Hon. J. S. MCarry - a member of Congress from this State, - saying that Mr Benjamin, Secretary of War, consented that they might go into the Company where he found them. Thereupon, my aid accepted them, as members of the Company. After the organization of the Regiment in which their Company was, had been commenced - and after a Colonel had had been elected - a Telegraphed dispatch was received, which seemed to indicate a change in the position of the Secretary of War -

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83 85 and to require the Soldiers above-named - to return to the 5th Regiment-Alabama volunteers. The withdrawal of the men, above named[?[ would have reduced the Company below the prescribed number and prevented the consummation of the Regimental organization. My aid permitted them to remain in the Company. A Regiment, of the finest quality, with Col. Shelley as its Commander, - has been organized, and is now ready ^and anxious^ for active service. Their term of service - as twelve-months men will expire in a few weeks.

In consideration of these facts - I hope you will pardon any irregularity which may have supervened in the organization of the Regiment - and permit the men to remain where they are. The men are, certainly, not to blame. c Very Resply, Your ob't Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter

c Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama, April 4th, 1862. Special Order No 1. It is hereby ordered that Harman Camisca - a convict in the Penitentiary, be, forthwith committed to close confinement - in his Cell, until the next Term of the Circuit Court of Coosa County, and that he be then remanded to said Court to be tried for killing A. Burrows, Late lessee of the Penitentiary. (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter.

Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama, April 4th, 1862. c copy Special order No 2. It is ordered that Disaboro[?] Ramo - and George Barrett, convicts in the Penitentiary, who assisted in subduing Harman Camiska - while engaged in killing the late Lessee be forthwith pardoned - restored to all the rights of citizenship and released from further confinement in the Penitentiary. (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama, April 4th, 1862. Special order No 3. It is, hereby, ordered, that the Watchmen - and all proper officers of the Penitentiary - who have - or may have, the direction and control of the Convicts, Shall shoot-down any and all Convicts, who may engage in any revolt - or Acts of Disloyalty to the Warden or other authorities, of that institution. (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c Proclamation, by the Governor of Alabama. Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama, April 10th 1862 Notwithstanding the urgent appeals which have been made in every form, by the press - by our public officials - including the Proclamation, which has heretofore issued from the Executive Department; and notwithstanding the plain course of action - which patriotic duty demands - I have been pained to hear that there are some among us, who, disregarding every other consideration, and, selfishly, pursuing their own sordid interests, are preparing to plant their usual crop of cotton - instead of a provision crop. I am happy to believe that these men are few in number, and can be easily identified, and should be held-up to the notice and condemnation of their fellow-citizens. I again warn the people against such a suicidal policy, and appeal to every true and loyal Citizen, to discourage - and denounce it in every proper way; and, if it be necessary, even to withdraw all sympathy and protection from men, who will deliberately peril the welfare of their country - to gratify the mere thirst for Gold. Though ours is a free Country, and we mean, with

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86 84 the blessing of God, to keep it so, these selfish - avaricious men have no right to disregard the public welfare - at a time like this - and seek the advancement of individual & sordid Ends, when they conflict with a policy - upon which all may depend for the subsistence of our Army and people.

I hereby give notice that I shall urge upon the next session of the General Assembly, the duty and sound policy of taxing all Cotton beyond what may be needed for Home consumption - and the supply of seed for another year, to the full extent of its value; and I think it every way probable, that persons who will persist in planting the usual crop of Cotton - or more than one acre to the hand, will not be allowed to enjoy the fruits of such a selfish & unpatriotic course.

[Locus Sigilli] In testimony whereof - I, John Gill Shorter, Governor of the State of Alabama, have hereunto set my hand - and caused the great Seal of the State to to be affixed - this the 10th day of April, A. D. 1862-

By the Governor, (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter

Attest. (Signed) P. H. Brittan Secretary of State.

N. B. The Newspapers throughout the State will publish the above Proclamation, one week, and forward their accounts, to the Executive office. (Signed) Jas S. Albright, Private Secy c

Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama, April 22d 1862 Genl Jeff. Davis, President C. S. A. Richmond, Virginia. Mr President: I addressed a communication to the Sec: of War, a short time since, upon the situation of affairs at Mobile & Pensacola, to which - in connection with this, I respectfully, beg leave to call your attention.

Since then I have visited both places, and now, in reference to Pensacola, especially, respectfully, make some statements, and offer some suggestions.

The situation of affairs at Pensacola is not, at all satisfactory.

We have, there about - 3000 men, and of these about one half only, are armed.

We are greatly of an office of the rank of Brigadier General, who will compact & organize matters, & inspire confidence. Colonel Jones - now in Command - feels and admits the need of such an officer, as much as any one else. Brigr-Genl Forney - who was ordered to report to Maj Genl Saml Jones - at Mobile - I saw at Mobile, and was greatly in hopes that he would be sent to Pensacola: but his arm was so painful - and so far from being entirely healed, that he was physically unable for the service, and it was not possible for the Surgeon to say when he would be well able. We must have a general at Pensacola, and one who will inspire confidence, and that soon, or the place, if the Enemy make any sort of an attack, will ^be^ evacuated, with confusion and disgrace, and if the attack be made at certain points, would probably, result in the capture of a large portion of our forces Untill Genl Forney recovers - so as to be equal to the service, could not some Brigadier Genl - whose character would inspire confidence at once be put in temporary command? I do know, personally Genl Ransom of N. C. but I find that he is highly

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85 87 esteemed by Col. Jones. What is done must be done soon. The Enemy, I apprehend, understand the situation of affairs - at Pensacola nearly as well as ourselves, and - doubtless, are only waiting to dispose of some other part of their Programme.

The importance of Pensacola to the cause at large, and especially to Middle and South-Alabama - and Mobile - cannot be overestimated. With a good General - and a well-armed force of 5000 men, it could be maintained - in my opinion, against any but an overwhelmng force. Surely, it is worth the effort, even though matters are pressing elsewhere, that will secure that much.

From information which I rely - I respectfully suggest to the President, that in organizing any Alabama Regiment at Pensacola, it would receive the services of a valuable officer, if he would name Capt. John R. F Tatnall - now - probably at Norfolk - as Colonel of a Regiment. We have good raw material, but are very much in need of well-trained - and competent officers. I do not know him personally; but being anxious for the Cause only, and relying upon such information as I can trust, I am desirous of seeing him placed in Command of an Alabama Regiment, at Pensacola.

I am doing what I can to gather-up - & furnish to the men at Mobile and Pensacola, country-Rifles and double-barreled Shot guns newly repaired, but this - without prompt and active help from the C. S. in the way of arms, will fall - far short of our necessities. With undiminished Confidence - I have the honor to be Your Excellency's ob't Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama, April 22d 1862 Dear Sirs, The Executive of the State has been informed that you - as lessees of a Salt-well and fixtures in Clark County, have a surplus of water which is not being manufactured into Salt. The great want and dearth of salt in the Confederate States is becoming a source of serious apprehension and alarm with all patriots, and it behooves every well-wisher of our glorious cause to increase, by every available means, the production of this article of prime necessity.

Appreciating - as I do - the just cause of this public apprehension, I, as the Executive of the State, have felt it my duty to address you - as good Citizens, and press upon your consideration the absolute necessity that the quantity of Salt within the reach of the people of Alabama, be largely increased. Supposing my information to be correct, as to the surplus of Salt-water within your control, I indulge the hope that you will be able, at a very early day, to enlarge your works - to the utmost capacity of the water you have. Should this not be the case - and should a proposition be made to you from a responsible source, to employ - and make available this surplus water - such proposition to be reasonable and just in it terms - and should you decline to accept such proposition; then I, as the Executive of the State, will feel it my duty to seize your works, as a Military-public necessity, that the same may be made completely subservient to the public welfare.

I invite - and will cheerfully await any explanations - or propositions you may offer. Very Respy, Your ob't Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c Messr Dennis, English & Thomas. Clark County, Alabama.

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