Civil War and Reconstruction Governors of Alabama

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88 86 Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama, April 25th 1862. Hon. G. W. Randolph, Sec'y of War, Richmond, Va. Sir, I, herewith, have the honor to submit accompanying documents - received from Genl Goldthwaite - touching the case of Charles H. Kellogg - who was arrested by ^order of^ Genl Beauregard), with in our lines near Corinth, and sent, in charge of a Guard to this place, being now under surveillance of the Prôvost-Marshall, by orders from Maj. Genl Jones.

Mr Lapsley - the writer of the letter to Judge Goldthwaite, - is a gentleman - well known to me - of the highest respectability & position - an old resident of the State - and of unimpeachable loyalty. I know the genuineness of his letter, and have no hesitation in vouching for every fact stated by him - as of his own personal knowledge; neither have I the slightest doubt of the genuineness of the other letters - compared copies of all of which - including that of Mr Lapsley - are submitted ; the originals, being retained in my possession.

I trust that it will not be deemed improper for me to say, that the correspondence of Mr Kellogg - as explained by the letter of M Lapsley, has produced - upon my mind, a strong conviction, that the party-referred-to had no object or purpose - prejudicial to the interests of the Confederate States, but that he is, at heart, wellaffected to the cause, & would rejoice in our success.

I shall forward copies to Genl Beauregard. I have the honor to be &cVery Respectfully, Your ob't Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama, April 25th 1862 Maj. Genl G. T. Beauregard, Corinth, Miss. Sir, I herewith have the honor to submit accompanying documents - recd from Genl Goldthwaite - touching the case of Chas H. Kellogg who was arrested, by your order, within our lines, near Corinth, and sent in charge of a guard - to this place, being now under surveillance of the ProvostMarshall, by orders from Maj-Genl Jones. Mr Lapsley - the writer of the letter to Judge Goldthwaite, is a gentleman - well-known to me, of the highest respectability and position - an old resident of the state - and of unimpeachable loyalty. I know the genuine^ne^ss of his letter, and have no hesitation in vouching for every fact stated by him, as of his own personal knowledge Neither have I the slightest doubt of the genuineness of the other letters - compared copies of all of which - including that of Mr Lapsley - are submitted; the original being retained in my possession. I trust that it will not be improper for me to say, that the correspondence of Mr Kellogg - as explained by the letter of Mr Lapsley - has produced upon my mind a strong conviction, that ^the^ party referred-to had no object or purpose in view - prejudicial to the interests of the Confederate States, but that he is, at heart, well-affected to the cause, & would rejoice in our success. I shall forward copies to the Sec'y of War.

I have ^the honor^ to be Very respectfully Your ob't Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

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90 88 Executive Department: Montgomery, Alabama, April 25th 1862 Hon. A. B. Clitherall Montgomery. Sir, The position of chief of ordnance for the State of Alabama having been vacated by the resignation of Maj. Saml B. Marks, this day, tendered and accepted, I beg to request that you will accept an appoint^ment^ to fill the vacancy. If agreeable to you to do so, I hope you will notify me of your acceptance - and enter, at once, upon the duties of the office.

On presentation of this letter to Maj. Marks, he will be authorized to turn over to you, all arms & ordnance-stores in his possession; together with the books, and other memoranda, in his possession - appertaining to the same Very respectfully, Your obedient Servant (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

Executive Department: Montgomery, Alabama, April 26th 1862 His Excellency Joseph E. Brown, Govr of the State of Georgia. Sir; The last mail brought me a letter from Rome Geo., a copy of which I herewith beg to enclose for your consideration. The suggestions I deem important, but it would be indelicate in me, to make any suggestions to the Secretary of War in relation to the Cavalry Regiment of Col. Morrison camped at Cartersville, without communication with you. If that Regiment, however, is armed, and could be encamped at Rome, and employed in Scout-duty on your State-Road and in North-East Alabama; it might, in this way, render valuable service.

I am organizing - here a Cavalry Regiment for Confederate Service, which will, likely, be full next week; and when the Government equips and arms it, the Regiment might be employed - and should be employed in Scout-duty in the Northern part of the State; and thus co-operate with Col. Morrison's Regiment, if the Secretary of War shall so order With high regards, I am Your ob't Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

Executive Department: Montgomery, Alabama, April 28th 1862. Hon. G. W. Randolph, Secretary of War, Richmond, Virginia. Sir; I have the honor to enclose you, herewith, a copy of a letter received at this Department, and, respectfully, beg leave to call your attention to the suggestions of the same. Under the last requisition made upon this State for troops, a Regiment of Cavalry has been raised - for the Confederate Service, and will be organized in a few days. I would respectfully suggest that this Regiment be armed as speedily as possible, and employed in giving protection to North-Alabama and the heavy interests - State & Confederate - at Rome, georgia. Very resp'y, Your ob't Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

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89 91 Executive Department: Montgomery, Alabama, April 30th 1862. Brigadier Genl John H. Forney. Head-quarters, Mobile, Alabama, Sir: My special aid Hon. A. J. Walker, is directed to report to you at your Head-Quarters at Mobile - to co-operate with you, in any measures, for the defense of the State. He is charged with important communications for your consideration, and will confer, freely, with you, and advise you of my earnest desire to obtain your assistance in completing the battery at Fort-Stoddard, and at Blakely, and in procuring Guns for batteries on the Alabama and Tombigbee Rivers. I regard, in the present aspect of affairs, the construction of these defenses of vital importance to the State. Respectfully, Yours, (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

Executive Department: Montgomery, Alabama, April 30 1862. Gentlemen, Your communication of the 28th inst. was duly received, advising me that the company, which you have the honor to command, have paid me the exalted compliment of unanimously naming their organization the "Shorter Dragoons". I beg you to express to the Company, the sense of gratitude I feel for this unexpected and undeserved honor; & to impress them with the unalterable purpose with which, in the future, as I have done in the past, I shall labor in the sacred cause of the Southern deliverance from Northern Domination. In this good work, I shall proudly claim the co-operation of the gallant men who compose the "Shorter-Dragoons"; and I know that in "the house which shall try men's souls," they will be found true to the cause of their beloved Alabama.

With my earnest wishes for the health - prosperity - success of the "Shorter-Dragoons," and with the assurances of very high personal consideration, I am, Gentlemen, Your friend, and fellow-Citizen, Respectfully, Yours, (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. To Messr James Cunningham, Captain. James H. CcCreary, 1st Lieut. John Lyon, 2d Lieut. H. E. Richardson, 3d Lieut. of "Shorter-Dragoons." c

Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama, May 1st 1862 To Jefferson Davis, Prest of the Confederate States. Sir: This will be handed you by Dr L. C. Garland, Prest of the University of Alabama, and superintendent of the Alabama Corps of Cadets. - I presume you are aware of the fact, that for two years, the University has been a Military institution, and that it is the Nursery of Military talent for the State. Its present Corps (125 strong) has discharged - and is still in the discharge of a most important public service - drilling the dozen Encampments of Volunteers in various parts of the State. The number engaged in this Service, and the manner in which the service has been discharged, prove, that the Military instruction of the Corps has been thorough. The importance of maintaining the integrity of the Corps, has the Super-intendent & myself - to

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92 90 resist all applications to resign, with a view to enter the Army. It has appeared to me that these trained young men can do more good in their present position, than in any other suitable to their age, and that it would be a public calamity to disband them.

But, under the Conscript Law - about three fourths of these cadets must pass - at once, unto the army of the Confederate States. This will, effectually, break-up the Corps, and close the doors of the University.

Besides, these Cadets will enter the Service under circumstances which will bear hardly upon them. They have been eager to enter the Volunteer Service, in which - perhaps - every one of them would have received a lieutenancy. This, we have resisted untill now, when all the Volunteer Companies are organized, and their opportunity of promotion is lost. They have drilled the 12.000 Volunteers of the State, & now, must go into the rank - and file of the army.

Under the circumstances, I hope that you will be able to devise some releif for the present Corps: and to institute such measures, as will enable the Superintendent to keep-up the operations of the Institution during the War.

I refer you, - more particularly, to Dr Garland, for information, and for the suggestion of such measures as may meet the necessities of the case. With great respect, I am Your ob't Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter.

Executive Department: Montgomery, Alabama, May 2 s 1862. Commodore V. M. Randolph, Flask-Officer, Mobile, Ala. Sir; I have had the pleasure to read your letters of the 27th Ulto. to Mr B. F. Randolph, of this City, and have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your communication of the 28th Ulto. addressed to myself, for all of which, I am greatly obliged. I heartily concur with you, in the expressed purpose & desire, if the Enemy obtain possession of Mobile, to fortify and obstruct the Alabama and Tombigbee rivers, so as to prevent their ascent into the interior of the State, & I will co-operate with Confederate - Naval - & Military authorities, to the full extent of my ability, in effecting such desirable results. The Committee of Safety of this City have been considering plans for obstructing the Alabama River, and closing the channel at the proper time; but there seems to be much difficulty in agreeing upon a plan which may be practicable - efficient - and capable of execution within the limited time which may be left us for its consummation. If you can give us any suggestions, to aid in the selection & adoption of the best means to this end, I will be very thankful for such assistance. Hon. A. J. Walker, Chief Justice of our Supreme Court - and Dr Robert J. Ware, will visit your city immediately, with authority to act in the premises, after consultation with you - & Brigadier Genl Forney. It is most desirable that our Naval & Military and State authorities should all harmonize & co-opearate, understandingly, in this important crisis, and I entertain no doubt but that such agreement can be had.

In reply to your most reasonable proposition, to turn-over the iron-clad Ram - the old Baltic - I beg leave to say, that there is a consideration or two, which I will state, involving a question of much delicacy, and embarassing my action somewhat, and will enable you to appreciate my position. The appropriation of $150.000 was made by the Legislature of Alabama, on application of Citizens of Mobile, to provide an iron-clad Ram for the defense of the waters of Mobile-Bay; a committee of Gentlemen of Mobile were authorized to receive

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91 93 the money, and were charged, by the act, with its proper disbursement - at their solicitation, - communicated, by me, to the Secretary of the Navy - Lieut. Johnston - who had made valuable suggestions in the repairs - and alterations of the boat - was relievd of the command of the Gun-Boat Gaines, and directed to report to me with the understanding that I would assign him to the command & superintendence of the repairs of the boat until completion, and then turn-over the boat to the Confederate Navy - to be armed & manned by the Navy. Under this arrangement & understanding between the Secretary of the Navy - and the Committee in Mobile, Lieut. ^Johnston^ was assigned his present positition. In the prosecution of the work, he is assisted by this Committee; the Carpenters and Shipwrights reside in Mobile; and the Committee prefer that that the boat should not be moved-away up the River, at least, for the present; assuring me, however, that arrangements are made, in case of danger, for her prompt removal out of reach of the Enemy. If this point be secured - your wishes will be met. The Secretary of the Navy, I understood, over six weeks ago, had ordered heavy guns to be cast, at Richmond, for this Ram, and I had hoped they would have been received by this time. The moment the Boat approached that completeness, which will fit her for service, it is my purpose promptly to turn her over to your Navy, and to order Lieut. Johnston to report to you for duty. If, in the meantime, you can procure suitable Guns and ammunition for the armament of the Boat, I will thank you to do so.

I have telegraphed both the War & Navy - Departments, to furnish guns - to plant - in battery on the Alabama & Tombigbee Rivers - and hope this proper request may be favorably, & immediately answered.

I beg to communicate to you - herewith - confidentially - a sketch of a Torpedo-gun-Boat, devised by Dr Jno B. Read of Tuscaloosa - the inventor of the "Read-Shell." I am not capable of passing upon its merits. Accompanying the sketch is a description of the Torpedo-attachment, and the manner of its application and use. I submit it for your consideration, and such action as you may be pleased to take, in relation to it. With great respect, I am, Dear Sir, Your ob't Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter.

Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama, May 2 d 1862. To His Excellency, Govr Pickens, Sir, I have to apologize for not having replied, at an earlier day, to your Excellency's communication of the 22d March. Almost immediately after its reception, I was called - away - by official engagements, and apprehending that I should not be able to give your suggestions the consideration which they merited, I requested a confidential friend to reply to your letter during my absence. Until my return, recently, I was not apprized that the friend, upon whom I imposed that duty, had been prevented, by ill-health, from writing to you.

Your views as to the importance of sustaining the Confederate government, by the energetic - & cordial co-operation of the States, meet my entire concurrence; and I am prepared to pledge the resources of this State, in any system of operations, which may be agreed-on, as necessary to the success of this great Revolution. I believe that the harmonious - determined - & persistent purpose of all the States, to sustain the Common Government, will be required to achieve success; and to that end, I am ready to consecrate all the powers - and all the resources of this Commonwealth. I am prepared, therefore, not only to meet - but to co-operate with your Excellency, in devising the means which are best calculated to ensure the harmonious

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94 92 action of the different states, and the most perfect combination of all our means of Defense.

The passage, by the Confederate Congress, of the law of Conscription will, to a considerable extent, suspersede the necessity of State-action on that subject. In my opinion, however, the entire white male popu^lation^, capable of bearing arms, should be enrolled; and I am preparing, with that view, a system by which, I hope to organize, and, as far as possible, to make a soldier of every man left in the State, and to secure such an organization, as, will make the entire population available for defense, wherever the State is invaded. The scarcity of arms and ammunition is a serious difficulty, in carrying out this policy, but I am sparing no exertions to collect & repair all the common arms of the Country - and I hope, in this way, to be able to arm a large proportion of the force thus left for Home-Defense.

The resources of this State, for the manufacture of almost every requisite for war-purposes, are, perhaps, unsurpassed, but they are, to a great extent, undeveloped. The War has done much for us; Capitalist are investing, largely, in manufactories of arms of every kind - of Salt-Petre & Sulphur - and the working of lead-mines. We have not - however - realized much yet, from these sources - Unfortunately for us, the impression has, very generally, prevailed - until lately, that the War would be of short duration, and that the raising of the blockade, by foreign intervention, would afford us access to the markets of Europe; and, on this account Capitalists have hesitated to embark in enterprizes for the manufacture of articles of prime necessity to us. The Legislature of the State made considerable appropriations to encourage private enterprize, but these appropriations, owning to the impression, to which I have alluded, fall far short of our necessities. I have made Contracts, whereever it it was possible to do so, for the manufacture of guns, but the deliveries, under these Contracts, have not yet commenced. One establishment, with which I had contracted for the manufacture of five thousand Mississippi rifles, the first of which were to have been delivered by this date, has been forced to remove its machinery to Georgia, in consequence of the invasion of our Northern Counties by the Enemy, and I shall, on that account, be subjected to considerable number of pikes & bowie-knives which are now ready for use. A large factory of arms is about being established, under the patronage of the state; which, it is probable, from the character of those engaged in it, will soon be put in operation. It is probable that the combination of the States, in making arms, would greatly expedite the equipment of our Soldiers. Different parts of a gun could be made from models, at different points, and sent to a common armory, for the purpose of being fitted to-gether for service. Such a division of labor, could it be accomplished, would be beneficial in the highest degree. To adjust the details of such a scheme, would require time and a knowledge of the capabilities of the States in Workmen, as well as material.

We have, at present, only three foundries in the state engaged in casting Cannon. Two others, which control large capital, and which are already supplied with machinery, will, in a short time, be prepared to commence operations and will manufacture heavy ordnance on an extensive scale.

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95 93 our resources for engaging in this branch of manufacture are almost unlimited. The mineral region of this state abounds in large quantities of iron - limestone and coal. Nothing but a combination of skill & capital is required to convert these resources into an abundant supply of all the munitions of War. Contracts have, also, been made, for the manufacture of Salt-petre on a large scale; but the richest cave, in the State from which we had anticipated a supply of two thousand pounds daily, is within the section now in the hands of the Enemy. There are other matters presented in your Excellencys communication, which are entitled to the gravest consideration. Such are your suggestions in reference to the purchase of arms abroad, with cargoes of Cotton, sent-out under State-authority; and the adoption of some policy by which the credit, or paper obligations of the different States, shall be mutually sustained. For the purpose of discussing these - and other matters, of vital importance to the success of the Revolution, I approve your suggestion, that the Executives of the different states should meet together at some convenient point; and I will take part in such a convention, at any point which may be selected. If, from your correspondence with the Governors of the other states, you have ascertained that such a convention is practicable, I shall be happy to meet you in such an assembly, and shall submit to your Excellency the appointment of the time and place, at which it shall be held. I have the honor to be, with great respect - Your most obedient Sservant; (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter.

Executive Department: Montgomery, Alabama, May 3 d 1862 To His Excellency, Governor Brown. Sir: I was applied-to, some time since, by the Mayor of the City of Columbus, to know whether I would co-operate in a movement to defend the Chattahoochie River. In response to that application, I appointed two gentlemen to act, in concert, with Commissioners, who, I was informed, would be appointed by your Excellency - and the Governor of Florida, upon similar applications from the City authorities of Columbus. I have been advised by the Gentlemen - appointed on the part of this State, that, upon visiting the points which had been selected for defense, they were informed, by Genl Trapier, of the C. S Army, that the Confederate Government had undertaken the work of defending the River, and that it was the purpose of the Government to construct such fortifications - and concentrate such a force upon the River, as would, effectually, secure the Country against invasion from that quarter. Since that time, however, it has been represented to me, that the defenses of the River are in a very unsatisfactory condition, and, in consequence, considerable anxiety prevails among the people, on both sides of the River. While I have no apprehension that the enemy will attempt an invasion - in force, from that direction, it is possible, in view of the large amount of Cotton on the plantations and at the various Depots on the river, and the extensive manufacturing establishments at Columbus, that they may attempt a predatory raid into the Country, which might result in the destruction of a large amount of property. In consideration of these facts, I have thought it proper to bring this subject to your notice, with a view to some co-operative policy, which may be adopted by the two states, for the purpose of effectually fortifying or obstructing the River. The River is within the jurisdiction of Georgia, and I have not, therefore felt at liberty to

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96 94 take any steps in the matter, without the consent and co-operation of your Excellency. The people on both sides of the River are equally exposed ^interested^ in securing the River against invasion. In guarding other points, which may be considered of more vital importance, the Common Government may not be able to look-after the local interests of every section of the Confederacy; and hence, without invading its policy for general Defense, we may concert such measures, as the interests of our people - in particular localities, may require. I am prepared, therefore, to co-operate with your Excellency, in devising a system of Defense, for the Chattahoochie River; and, for that purpose, if my views meet your concurrence, I will appoint one or more Commissioners to represent this State, who, in concert with similar Commissioners on the part of Georgia, shall be authorized to undertake the work, and to do - fully, whatever may be necessary in the premises.

Awaiting your Excellency's views I am Sir, most Resp'y (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter c

Executive Department: Montgomery, Alabama, May 3 d 1862. Genl L. W. Jenkins, Head-Quarters, 19th Brigade, A. M. Sir: I am, to-day, in receipt of your letters of the 27th & 28th Ulto. and, in reply, have to say that I duly appreciate the unfortunate position of affairs - detailed by you, and am sincerely anxious that the proper & most effectual means shall be adopted to meet the exigency Col Robt Jemison Junr of Tuscaloosa, my special aid in N. W. Ala. had been on a visit, recently, under orders from this Department, to the Counties - mentioned by you, and has reported here, in person, and is fully possessed of all my views in reference to the important and delicate matters referred-to in your letter. On this account, I have thought it best to forward your letters to Col. Jemison, for his consideration, & such action as, in accordance with my private & confidential ^inter^views with him, may be found most practicable & efficient. I hope this course may meet your own approbations, and advise that you may - with unlimited confidence, consult with Col. Jemison. Very Resp'y ob't Ser't, (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

Executive Department: Montgomery, Alabama, May 3 d 1862. Hon Geo. W. Randolph, Secretary of War Richmond. Sir; I have the honor to enclose you, herewith, an application for the transfer of four members of Capt. Amos' Company = "The Simpson Mounted Rangers." The grounds upon which this application is made are as follow. 1st. The three first-named applicants are Citizens of Alabama, and are in a 12-months Florida Company. 2d. The Florida Company is re-organizing and these men wish to join "the Shorter Dragoons." a company in the 2d Alabama Cavalry-Regiment - just organized for three years or the War. 3d. Young Amos is a citizen of Florida, as I am informed, but wishes to join the same Company, and it is also the wish of his father, that he should do so. I earnestly recommend that the Alabamians be transferred to an organization from their own States

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97 95 and if not incompatible with the public interest, would be pleased if the wishes of Young Amos should be gratified. Very respectfully, Your obedient Servant, (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

Executive Department: Montgomery, Alabama, May 5 th 1862. Dr. Wm. H. Rives, & John P. Figh[?], Esqr Gentlemen, Professor John Darby goes to Clarke County by my authority, to explore the Salt region in that County, for the purpose of reporting to me, the capacity of the Waters there, for the manufacture of Salt. Will you be good enough to afford him all necessary facilities, for obtaining the information I desire.

The services of Profr Darby have been secured, for this purpose, by the State, and I wish him to make as thorough an exploration by the State as possible. I desire that he shall examine all the springs, which are now being worked, as, also, to survey the surrounding Country - with a view to increasing the number of Springs. During his stay, I commend him to your kind offices. Very Resp'y Yours. (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

Executive Department Montgomery May 5 th 1862 Brig Genl John H. Forney; Head Quarters, Mobile, Sir: Mr Force, private in 5th Ala Regt. discharged the Service, as per order, which he will exhibit to you, & ordered to report to me. He is highly recommended by Lieut. Col. John S. Morgan, as a civil engineer, & I wrote for him to come out & aid the State in construction of batteries & fortifications on our rivers. I have ordered ^him^ to proceed to Mobile and report to you for duty, to be assigned in any of your river works, & I presume he can be profitably employed under direction of Capt Liemer[?], to whom you can order him to report - if you think proper. He is employed by me for the State Service, but I will place him under your direction, to be used in the best Service in the present emergency. Your obedient Servt c (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter.

Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama, May 6th 1862 Brig. Genl Jno H. Forney, Head quarters, Mobile. Sir, I beg to introduce, to your favorable acquaintance, Capt. Peyton Randolph, who will confer, freely & fully, with you at my request, upon the subject of our river defenses.

I hope that you may agree, upon some disposition of Capt. Randolph, by which the state can have the benefit of his skill and services, in the present emergency. Very Respectfully, your ob't Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

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99 97 ment of Cavalry, raised in Alabama, in addition to a number of Independent Companies, which have entered the service, from this State. The First Regiment, commanded by Col. Clanton, now at Corinth, was equipped - & furnished sabres by the Confederate Government, but furnished with Pistols - carbines - and shot-guns, by the State. All the other Cavalry Companies were armed - in whole or in part, by the State. The 28 Regiment - now organized - must be armed by the Confederate Government. This state - now - has no small arms, except country rifles and short-guns - limited in number - which it is my duty to retain within the limits of the State, for local protection and defense. If, in the great battle, now impending at Corinth, success shall crown our arms, as I hoped & believe it will, by the blessing of God, then the War-department may need this 2d Cavalry Regiment for other - and distance service; but should we lose the battle, the whole Northern portion of Alabama will be exposed to the ravages of the Enemy; and, in such contingency, I think I may, with propriety, urge upon the department to assign one or both of our Cavalry Regiments to the defense of our own exposed localities. In that event - and to secure a most desirable purpose, the State would endeavor to aid, in arming, with shot-guns, the Cavalry force which might be retained within her borders. I need not remind you of the importance - and absolute necessity of a strong Cavalry force, in the mountains, to hold-in-check the Enemy's Scouts and mounted Troops, who would endeavour to make descents upon - and destroy - our iron-works, & armories and founderies, located at Rome, Georgia - and in Cherokee - Talladega - and Shelby Counties in Alabama. We have, in our mountain Counties, also, Salt-petre Caves - which are being worked; and lead & sulphur mines of great necessity & value. I hope - & doubt not that these considerations will be duly weighed by your department, in any future disposition which may be made of the Cavalry force of this State. Very Respectfully, Your ob't Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama, May 7th 1862. To his Excellency, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States. Dear Sir, I beg leave - as the Governor of Alabama, to bring to your notice, and recommend, as, in every way, worthy of promotion, Private William H. Linebaugh, of Company D. 8th Alabama Regiment, Col. John A. Winston.

Private Linebaugh distinguished himself by an act of brilliant gallantry, on the 22d of December last, in a heavy skirmish with the Enemy, at New Market Bridge, on the Peninsula of Virginia, in which a portion of his Regiment was engaged. After driving the Enemy beyond the Creek, over which stood the New-Market Bridge, young Linebaugh and five or six others, charged a temporary redoubt, at the bridge, about one hundred yards in advance of his main position, driving the enemy from it, and taking one prisoner - the Color Sergeant of the Twenty ___. New York Regiment. Young Linebaugh, after the surrender of the prisoner, crossed alone, on the remains of the bridge, to the redoubt - within the Enemy's lines - and in face of his fire, and took from the Redoubt, The Federal flag - and bore it back to his Command - the solitary object of the Enemy's fire for several hundred yards, the Command being in retreat, without his having heard the order given, while he was within the Enemy's lines

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