Civil War and Reconstruction Governors of Alabama

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Shorter_correspondence_RSG00689_Q145250_Q145648

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Montgomery, as your disbursing Agent This Bank is controlled by able financiers and patriotic men who have already done a great deal for the Governmentand the Army. Large advances have been made, by this Bank to the Government Paymasters, to supplydeficiencies; but in such large transactions. it is but just that the Bank should have the resposibility of the Government to stand upon, and not that merely of its Agents. If your will adopt or secure the bank as a disbursing Agent, and give an order toMaj. I. S. Calhoun - Ass't Dr Martin here, to check for bounty money as needed, I shall then feel satisfied, + know that every thing will work wellin this particular, and will also be able to get up the Volunteer regiments, with far greater certainty and despatch and most earnestly hoping that this important suggestion may receive your imediateattention. I am with high regards, Your Obt. Ser't. (Signed) Jn Gill Shorter. Letter from Govr. Shorter to Hon. J F. Foster Butler, Choctaw County, Ala. Executive Deptartment Montgomery Ala. Feb. 1st 1862 Hon. J. F. Foster, Butler, Choctaw Co. Ala. Sir, I Have the honor to a acknowledge rc't of your letter, comicating a copy of certain Resolutions adopted by a County meeting of the Citizens of Choctaw Countyat Butler, on the 20th ultimo. The reported proceedings of the meeting disclosed that Col. Wm. H. Ulard, Hon Wm. Woodward and yourself, were appointed a Committee to forward a Copy of its proceedings + resolution to this office, and as you are pleased to say, in your letter to me, "after you have given the Resolutions of a meeting of the citizens of Choctaw County at Butler due consideration please send them to the Advertiser of your city for publication" I pressume I am to understnd that your communications was intended to be official, and that I am expected to intimate my views upon the matters covered by the Resolutions. Though this informally presented and though heavily pressed by the various duties of this Department I will hurriedly, discuss the Resolutios communicated with that candor & frankness due to the occaisionas well as to the people of Choctaw County. This they have a right to expect at my hand for the "declaration of rights" embodied in the Constitution of the State of Alabama, expressly recited that" the citezens have a right in a peaceable manner, to assemble together- for theirCommon good, & to apply to those invested with the powers of Government, for redress of grievances or other purposes, by petition, address, or remonstrance The Resolutions before me, express dissatisfaction - first with the "Stray-Law" adopted by the Legislature, not because it goes too far, but because it does not go far enough in the opinion of the meeting - toward affording releif in the present crisis and one of the rsolutions recommend a " Constitutional Stray-Law assimilating as near as practicable to the Stray-Lawof Mississippi." 2dly the resolutions do not favor the collection of the State taxes assessed for the pastyear and suggest as a measure of releif liabilities, which treasury notes shall be redeemed by taxes to be collected at some future time.

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42

As these recommendations can be made available only by Legal enactment, through the Legislative body - an appeal is made to me, as the Executive of the State, to call the Legislature into Extraordinary Session, and to recommend these measures of supposed releif for its adoption.

After mature & calm deliberation, I am constrained to inform those citizens of Choctaw County, who adopted these resolutions, that in view of the vast interests, now at Stake, I cannot convene the Legislature of Alabama in an extraordinary Session, for the purposes contemplated by their resolutions.

Were I to comply with their re-commendation, the order would call back to the Capitol, the Same Senate - and the Same House of Representatives, which composed the last Genl. assembly. The "Stay-law" complained of was the only one - after much difficulty - and conflict of opinions, which could be adopted by that body. The proposition to post-pone the Collection of the State-Taxes, and to supply their deficiency by Loans or Treasury-Notes, was diligently urged and defeated. What guarantee have we that the Same Senate & the Same House of Representatives would reverse their action upon these important measures, which received Such full consideratin at their hands? The people of the State might justly question - at a time like the present, whcn we should [occonomize?] the public expeniture, the propriety of an extra-Session - for the mere purpose of a re-consideration of measures by the Same General assembly - which had devoted great labor & attention to them, while the two Houses themselves would have reason to reproach the Executive for such an assumption of authority, and such an exhibition of Vanity as would be involved in the idea, that his recommendation - merely - would cause them to retrace their Steps, and adopt measures which they had deliberately condemned.

I owe it - however, to the people of Choctaw County; and I owe it to my own high conviction of duty to Alabama to Say to you, that approving most cordially, the general measures of Legislation adopted by the last Session of the General Assembly - & knowng the absolute necessity which constrained their refusal to post-pone the collection of the public dues, I could not recommend the measures proposed - even if the Legislature Should be convened in an extraordinary Session. On the contrary, I am confident that the adoption of such measures would be fraught with lasting injury to the future credit & welfare of the State.

The "Stay-law" passed by the Legislature, though, by no means, perfect in its provisions, and though amenable to objections, which have been urged against it, is yet beleived to be within the Constitutional limitation of the Legislative power. I have not seen the "Stay-law of Mississippi" - but if the law closes the Court-room against the Citizen, and denies all remedy for the assertion of his legal rights, as it has been represented to do, it is clear to my mind that such a law is unconstitutional, and without the limit of the Legislative power.

In times of public calamity, it is quite common to talk of Legislative aid & releif to the people; forgetting that the Government is the mere machine of the people; that it derives all its powers from them; is fed by their bounty, and dependent, upon them alone, for its continued existence, many, with misguided views, appeal to it for nourishment & support. And, to-day, when the State of Alabama and her sister Confederate States are engaged in a death-Struggle for their National Existence, the Strange and Sad Spectacle is seen, of persons, far-away from the clangor of arms, and amid the quiet retreat of their homes, clammoring for aid from the public Treasury, when every dollar at our Command, and the utmost limit of our national credit should be consecrated to the glorious cause of our deliverance and Liberty.

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The proposition to suspend the collection of our state-taxes, and to meet the liabilities of the State, by the issuance of treasury notes, however plausible it may appear on its face is submitted. I am quite sure, without that full and accurate information, as to the character and extent of our state-liabilities, which is essential to be had in order to obtain a clear comprehension of the subject. The Comptroller of Public accounts, in his last Biennial report to the General Assembly, on the 30th of September 1861, says; "Im making-up the usual estimates for the ensuing fiscal year, I find that the probable amount to be received from all sources where revenue is desirable, will be $874,950; and that the probable disbursements, for the same time on account of the Civil List, will amount to $789,104; leaving an excess of receipts over disbursements of $85,846; inclusive of the balance now in the treasury. This estimate of the probable disbursements embraces only the ordinary expenses of the State-Government, including interest to acccrue and which must be provided-for during the fiscal year on the entire amount of the present state-debt; amounts appropriated for educational purposes; balances of unpaid-special appropriations, and loan of $100,000 obtained from the Central Bank. To meet so much of the above sum of $789,104 - estimate of probable amount of disbursements on account of the Civil List for the fiscal year ending 30th Sept. 1862 - as shall be required for educational purposes and to defray the ordinary expenses of our State administration, the Legislature might force the acceptance of Treasury. Notes, but the interest upon the Bonded debt of the State foreign and Domestic. Embraced in the Comptrollers estimate, together with the interest upon new loans contracted since, and others yet to be made, to pay appropriations for the military defense of the State, and the interest upon the Confederate War tax, which will accrue upon the loans soon to be made for that amount, none of which is embraced in the estimate of the Comptroller and all of which must be provided-for out of the Civil list will amount, in the aggregate, to nearly $500,000. This amount, which will be due to the Creditors of the State who hold her Coupon Bonds, for the prompt payment of which the honor of the State is pledged can be liquidated only by such currency as these Creditors will accept. The State, being the debtor, cannot dictate the mode in which she will cancel these obligations, and if not to be presumed that her creditors will accept an exchange of her own paper securities in payment of the Debts of the State. It would be a humiliation--indeed--to the proud State of Alabama, if, by unwise legislation, she should be driven to submit such a proposition to her Creditors. No State on the American Continent has been more careful of her good name, and not one this day--whose bond stands--deservedly higher in the markets of the World than Alabama. Her pledged faith has been sacredly guarded by her devoted sons; and I trust, in God, that they may never see the day of her repudication, o shame! No! Sir, they will sacrifice all that they "have + are", before they will suffer such a calamity to befall her. In this connection, allow me--briefly--to present a condensed statement of our State indebtedness this day: Foreign Debt on interest...$3,445,000 Domestic Debt on interest...$3,521,000 Total this day...$6,996,000 Add probable amount of Confederate War tax assumed by the State and to be raised by loans...2,000,000 Add unexpected appropriations for military defense to be raised by loan...1,500,000 Total amount...10,466,000

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44

with these figures staring us in the face - and in view of our imperative duty to devote our entire resources to a vigorous defense against the unholy war now being waged for our destruction by the crazy abolition-States of the North, I ask if it would not be unwise - if it would not be impracticable - aye - more, if it would not be suicidal to Embark the State of Alabama in new - and untried, magnificent & wild Schemes of State-banking - of State-financieving of State-Treasury-notes - amounting to millions - kiting - it over the GinHouses and cotton-bags from one extremity of the State to the other.

I observe, in the proceedings of another meeting, held in the County of Choctaw, on the 5th ulto, and which have been forwarded to me, a resolution - recommending a called Session of the Legislature, for the purpose of adopting "Some policy by which the people may have circulation based upon the Cotton", and Suggesting "a general banking-law for the State, with sufficient guarantees on property and cotton to protect the bill-holders - that the planters may have, in every county in the State, a Bank - from which may be issued $20 a bale on so much of our Cotton, as the people may wish - thus to hypothecate." I am persuaded that such a reckless - and visionary Scheme, however honestly entertained by some, would bring disaster and ruin upon the State. An advance of $20- per bale upon the Cotton-crop of Alabama would require not less than $16,000,000! The State liabilities - I have already Shown - may reach - during the present fiscal year, the Sum of $10,455,000! An advance - by way of accomodation to the Cotton-planter, as proposed, might therefore, run-up the State indebtedness to over $20,000,000! But is the State to discriminate - alone - in favor of the Cotton-planter? Will she be guilty of Such partiality as to deny relief to the farmer who raises no Cotton - the Corn & wheat grower, the Stock-raiser, the Mechanic, the printer - the rattle of whose press has been silenced, the School-teacher, the honest Merchant, whose debts have been suspended, and who has not polluted his fingers with gains by extortion, and all the various classes of our people, who are, alike, equally devoted to the State, and thousands of whom are now fighting the battles of the Confederacy, while others - snugly housed at home, are concocting Schemes for releif out of a common Treasury [in the margin:Ended 12th] but in which these brave warriors are to have no part nor lot.

The advocates of this cotton-Scheme, however, seem to have overlooked the impossibility of resting it upon any solid basis, and of so adjusting its machinery as to Safely accomplish their own views - and protect the State against immense losses, which, in the end, all the people, whether they have participated in the benefits of the advances or not, will have to make good by many long years of taxation. The History of our exploded State -bank System, and of the releif-Schemes - undertaken by the Legislature in 1837 furnished a Solemn warning against the repetition of such unwise expedients.

Besides, it is manifestly true that while a few hundred thousand of Treasury-notes might be circulated at their par-value; the issue of many millions of Such notes - by the State - would cause the whole to depreciate, and this depreciation would fall upon the very Class who would receive them at par. It is Said they are needed by the people to buy iron, Salt, bacon, clothing - medicines &c. The merchant, to whom such notes would be tendered, in payment, would decline to receive them at par, for the reason that he wants a currency - which can use out-of- as well as in the State, and with which he can purchase his merchandize for re-Sale. The issues of Solvent Banks, & the Treasury-notes of the Confederate State constitute such a Currency. The Banks of the different States, by an arrange

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ment made with each other, to adjust their balances by the use of the Confederate Treasury notes, have secured a free circulation for their own issues, out-of--as well as in the State. I am persuaded that, with all the data before them, and after a calm, dispassionate view of the whole matter, the advocates of such plans of State-financiering and Banking will abandon them, and cheerfully submit to those unusual burdens and privations which have been unfortunately, imposed upon us, by a cruel + unrelenting, and which can be alleviated + removed only by a glorious triumph of our arms. In conclusion, I have to say that the General Assembly of Alabama never did a wiser thing than to refuse to post-pone the collection of our State taxes. The twenty-five percent levied on the State assessment amounting to about $200.000, for the laudable purpose of providing support + maintenance for needy families of the soldiers can be realized in no other way than by a present collection of the taxes. And can there be one man found within the broad limits of Alabama, who is not ready to respond to such a claim upon his pense? God pity the miserly [1 word illegible] if such there be! Yes Sir. The State necessities require that all the taxes shall be collected - and speedily collected. The money is needed for the education of our children, as well as for the support of the indigent families of our gallant volunteers, who, far away from home and loved-ones are baring their brave hearts to the guns of the Enemy; it is needed to keep the wheels of our State-Government in motion and to sustain its various departments in their appointed orbits, the more effectually to protect the life-liberty+ property of the Citizen; and it is needed, beyond all other considerations, at this perilous hour, to maintain the plighted honor of this great State, and to enable her to bend all her mighty power and will for the achievement of the independence of the Confederate States of America. The Cotton-States were the first to throw-off the yoke of Northern-despotism. Their proud necks could not endure the hateful burden; and now, where the storm of the battle rages, where the Enemy are gathering around our own hearth-stones, shall we coolly sir down, and count the cost and sacrifice needed, even, to meet the ordinary taxed of our State administration? They are but a trifle more than in former years, and cotton + other produce is still commanding prices, even beyond those we have, often, been pleased to accept in the past. Is is not the pressure of taxation that brings disquietude and arouses this outcry for Legislative interposition. It is the unnatural + barbarous war that the Lincoln usurpation has imposed upon us. But though disasters may befall us, and though treasure + blood must flow in the mighty struggle, we shall, with the blessing of God, live to be free. The sunlight is gleaming over the distant hills, and, in due time, we shall enjoy its radiant splendor. The gross assessment for the County of Choctaw is $12.806.23. and by the last census, it appears that the small sum of nonety-three cents per capita of the total population in the County, will pay the whole amount. There is not an able-bodied man in the State, who cannot pay the average tax on $1.000 worth of property, by five days' work at fifty cents per day or by the sale of six bushels of corn, or even one dozen chickens! A large number of our people move-on, as though we were not even engaged in war. Its beer dues are scarcely felt, or complained of it felt. The silver mounting on the bridle has not yet been dimmed. Much of the assessment has already been collected, in many of the Counties; in others, the public officers are proceeding, with commendable zeal in the discharge of their duties; while, in all, it is to be hoped, for the honor of the State, that a patriotic people will promptly respond to this call of their Country. Respectfully, [3 words illegible] (Signed) John Yill Shorter

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Executive Department Montgomery Alabama, Feb 13th 1862 My dear General Bragg, I enclose you a communication which-it occurs to me, may containsome valuable suggestions, and make it the occasion for introducing, to your favourable notice, its author-Mr Peter Hamilton, a gentleman, whose talents-accuracy-and modesty you will appreciate on a very short interview. He is, I think thoroughly posted and had conveyed, to my mind, a clearer idea of the appraoches to mobile, and the defenses, than any one I have yet conversed with. He is, deservedly held in high estimation by every one who knows him well, and there

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48 Executive Department: Montgomery, Alabama, Feby 13th 1862 Hon. J. P. Benjamin, Sec't of War, Richmond, Va. Sir,

I have the honor to acknowledge the rec't of your communication of the 2nd inst. making a requisition on this State, for 12 Regiments to serve for three years or during the War, but have not up to this time seen or been able to obtain a copy of the Act to the title of which you refer and, under which, the requisition is made.

I understand, however, from the tenor of yours, that the troops can be mustered into service - by companies - only, and subsisted-only from the time they are mustered-in. If I am correct in this, I feel it my duty to state to you, with perfect frankness, that I am satisfied that the requisition cannot be filled by the time you prescribe, if indeed, it can be filled at all. The Volunteers do not consider themselves bound, until musteredin; and it is all imporatnt that this should be done as early as possible. If they could be mustered-in in squads - of not less than ten, or twenty - as fast as that number arrived at the Camp with might be designated, and on condition, that, if the requisite number was not obtained within a fixed day, to complete the company to which they were to be attached, they should be distributed into other companies, which had not the maximum number, or formed, with other squads, into new Companies.

This course was successfully tried in the late requisition made upon this State by Gen. A. S. Johnston. If it can be allowed-in the present instance, I would urge, that the authority - as to mustering-in both companies and squads - as well as the distribution of the latter as proposed, or their organization into companies, be delegated to the State Executive, to be exercised under his direction, rather than by the Confederate Officers. The former would be to a certain extent - responsible for the exercise of this power - so as most to promote the comfort of the Volunteers, and they would accept the conditions, the more readily - and cheerfully, in the one case than in the other. As to the mere act of mustering-in, the reasons are still stronger, in favour of the exercise of that Power by the State. The Confederate Officers can scarcely find time to muster-in Companies - much less - Squads. In Montgomery - for instance - there is a Quarter-master, a Commissary - and an Ordnance Officer, all of whom are changed - with important duties, as the time their services - as mustering officers - are required. The men become restless: Enough leave to reduce the ranks below the minimum number; and the consequence is the disbandment of the Company. It is within my own personal knowledge, that the Confederacy has lost the services of two thousand Volunteers, in this State, for no other cause, than that the mustering-officer was prevented, by his other duties, from leaving this point, on the day on which the Companies were ready. Should not this authority be delegated to the StateExecutive? It costs the Confederacy nothing, and I venture the assertion, that my Aids-du-Camp - or the officers I should deFail to discharge this duty, would perform it as correctly - and with as much alacrity, as the Confederate Officers. As to subsistence, I would, respectfully suggest that as soon as a certain number of the volunteers arrive, and are mustered-in, either as Companies or squads, upon the conditions I have specified, they should be subsisted from that time. The expectant officers + their friends cannot subsist their men, from the time they commence recruiting, until the number requisite complete the Company is obtained. I speak within bounds, when I say that thousands have been lost to the servicem from this Cause alone. What I propose is simply this; as fast as Volunteers arrive at the Camps, I would muster-them-in by Companies or squads - the latter signing a printed engagement with the proper Condition. They should receive, from that time, subsistence until other details can

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47 49 be added, which your own practical experience & judgement will, if necessary, readily suggest.

In relation to the payment of the bounty-money, I would beg leave to suggest, that it would contribute much to the success of the requisition, if I could give my personal & official assurance, that its payment would be punctually made The Volunteeers as a class, can seldom appreciate the difficulties in this direction, and any delay in making the payment would operate injuriously, by its effect upon the zeal and sprit of our people. Genl Bragg can bear testimony that the First Ala. Regiment was Saved to the service, by an advance of Fifty thousand Dollars obtained from the Bank at this place, to pay the Bounty, and arrears of pay due, without which, in all probability, they would not have re-enlisted.

In relation to the clothing, also, I would beg leave to enquire if the issues, by the Department, to the Volunteers will include blankets - shoes - and under-clothing, and, also, if the Confederate Government will be able to furnish clothing - in kind, to all the Troops from this State, during the Spring - Summer, and Fall. Information, on these points, is essential - not only to answer the inquiries of the Volunteers, but, also, for the purpose of determining - and regulating the action of the State, in providing supplies of clothing for them, in case it should not be furnished by the Confederacy.

You will, my dear Sir, readily appreciate the motive which has induced this rather lengthy communication, and excuse the liberty I have taken, in pressing these matters on your attention. I should not have done so, had I not regard it as absolutely necessary to meeting the requisition in the shortest possible time.

I have the honor to be, Very Resp'y Your Obt Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter

Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama Febr 14th '62 Lieutenant-Col. Jno T. Morgan Camp Davis' ford. [check]

Dear Col. Your esteemed favour of Jany 31st has remained unanswered this long- because I have been compelled - by press of occupation to delay an answer It is with pain that I learn that our brave 12-months Alabama men, now in the army, are likely to be slow in re-enlisting for the war. If trained men, now in the army, can, from any cause, short of physical inability, reconcile it to their minds & hearts to weaken the force - which stands - as our only wall of defense against the invader, the influence upon the cause of the Country, and the prospect of raising new additional Troops, - which we greatly need - must be most disastrous.

What you say about the absolute justness of a system of drafting - or Conscription, is most true: but if we are to depend upon that system to maintain the liberties of the South, I should, almost, despair of our ultimate Triumph. It is not upon men who will insist upon what is strictly fair & just to themselves - that we can rely, in such a contest - and to the generous - the un-selfish - the self-denying - the self-sacrificing - the spirit of martyrdom - in men & women - must charactize this Contest, on our part, or we will be overwhelmed by the huge power, arrayed against us - stimulated - as it is - to the highest degree - by the impending ruin that our success necessarily entails upon them. [stricken words]

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50 48 If our Enthusiasm for Liberty does not prove equal to their Sordid love of money - and lust of dominion - they must prevail.

The reasons, to my mind, against an extra-session of the Legislature - and I have studied the subject - carefully - are too strong to be shaken. I should regard such a session at this time, as the signal for confusion - and dismay. Besides - if we are to fall-back upon a draft or Conscription, the Confederate Congress should lead the way. We may have to employ it, or, at least try it - after all; but I can but re-iterate the opinion, that, if our liberties are to be won by Conscripts or Drafted-men the Contest is to become one much more dubious than I have ever, yet, been inclined to admit. No! my dear Morgan! let us call for Volunteers - the willing Soldiers of their Country & her liberties, until it shall, conclusively, appear, that such will not respond to the Call.

These late reverses have filled the Country with new spirit and energy. Present me, kindly, to the Gentlemen mentioned in your letter.

I remain, truly, Yours. c (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

Executive Department, Maj. Genl Bragg. Mobile; [check] Sir, I beg to hand you - enclosed - a letter to Brigadier-General Thos J. Butler, A. M. unsealed, and which I desire you to read. You will send for him - and confer - fully - as to the plan, as I wish to fully, understand it - before the step - contemplated - is taken. Of course, you need no further assurance from me, that I am ready, at any moment, to bring any - and every power - I possess, to your aid. If you should - at any time - deem it necessary to have Genl Butler's Command ordered into active service, I will thank you to advise me. The Condition of our State - Treasury, and the beleif that the Emergency does not yet demand it, have, so far controlled my action.

Allow me, also, to remind you of the embarrassment, which might arise out of any conflict - or question of rank, in case this Brigade is ordered into actual service. Your wishes will be duly considered by me - in every contingency.

Very Respectfully, Your ob't Serv't. (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter.

Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama, Febr 13th 1862.

[Brigadier] Genl Thos J. Butler, A. M. Mobile. Sir; Your favor of the 10th inst. reached me yesterday; I avail myself of the first opportunity to reply after mature consideration, I have deemed - it proper to approve your recommendation - So far as to muster into service, the armed - and organized companies in your Command, with stipulations for pay - at 40 cents per day - to non-commissioned - officers and privates - for each day they may be engaged in drilling, - not exceeding three days in the week; I enclose the form of Resolutions to be adopted by the respective Companies - & certified, by their officers - to you, before they are mustered in to prevent any conflicts or embarrassments, I deem it proper, however, to enclose this letter to Genl Bragg, that he may be advised of the plan - and confer with you before its adoption. If - after full consultation, he approves it, I will dispatch you an order to have the Companies mustered into the State - Services - on advice, as to the particular Companies, which may adopt the resolutions enclosed. Very respy, Your ob't Ser't. (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter - c

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49 51. Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama, Feby. 18th 1862 Mr. Joseph Angell, Huntsville, Ala. [check] Dear Sir, Your letter, to Mr James S. Albright, is received, enclosing a list of guns. You will repair the arms to which you alluded. Take no private arms that are not fit for service; but take all U. S. Muskets and Rifles, that you can repair - and repair them. Very Resp,y (Signed) A. B. Moore, aid-du Camp -

Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama. Feby 14th 1862. Genl D. C. Green, Q. M. Genl of Ala. at Mobile. [check] Sir, Enclosesd - I hand you check for amount of $1411 50/100, to cover estimates, as per memorandum for Hospital-supplies. You will please state ^a/c^ of items of the same, for the bed-sacks - separately - amounting - in the aggregate - to $520 15/100. and receipt the account as paid, by me, this day, from funds contributed by the Grand Lodge of Alabama. Also, receipt to me - as paid this day - $445 50/100, for 297 flannel-shirts, at $1 50/100 , from funds contributed by the Grand Lodge of Alabama. Also receipt to me ^as paid^ this day, same amount, [stricken word] for 29 flannel drawers - paid by me out of Fund appropriated to the Medical Department, by act of the General Assembly approved 6th of February, 1861. Also, please send me rect of the person to whom the flannels were issued. As I have to report these items of Expenditure - I must have the proper vouchers. Pack - & ship the BedSacks to Col. W. R. Pickett - A. Q. M. at Montgomery.

Have you forwarded the bones - for the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa? Your ob't Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter.

Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama, Feby 15th 1862. Col. W. D. Dunn, Mobile. [check] Sir, In reply to your letter of Yesterday - and realizing the necessity suggested, I have the pleasure to advise you, that I will advance the Committee of Safety - Ten thousand Dollars, additional, in State-Bonds. Interest payable - semiannually, to be sold at Par. You may appoint an agent to receipt for them, or await my arrival - by the 21st Inst. when I expect to visit your city. Very respectfully, Yr ob't Ser't. (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter.

Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama, Feb 13th 1862 Maj. Genl Thos W. McCoy - A. M. Mobile; [check] My dear Sir; I sincerely regret that it has not been in my power to reply at an earlier day, to your polite letter of the 23d Ultimo; and now regret that the pressure of official duties forbids as full an answer, as I would be glad to send you. You will allow me to express - also - my regret that my letter of the 18th Ulto. was not deemed satisfactory - by you. In that letter, I gave the reasons which controlled my action. I frankly confess, that it would have been more in accordance with military Etiquette, and the provisions of the Military Code - to which you refer me - to have extended my orders to BrigGenl Butler, through you, but on the emergency - in which I was placed, I did not stop - coolly - to examine - into, or - rigidly - to follow the Etiquette - merely - of the Code, when I was well satisfied, that I had the unquestioned power to extend my orders to Brig Genl Butler, and when I believed that its prompt

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