Civil War and Reconstruction Governors of Alabama

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Shorter_correspondence_RSG00689_Q145250_Q145648

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57 Executive Department Montgomery, Alabama, Feb 10th 1862. "To the officers, + privates, in the 3rd Alabama Regiment:"

I have the honour to address you in a brief - but candid discussion of the question-now being daily asked - "will the 3rd Alabama Regiment re-enlist?" All agree that, while there may be a few of your number who would be glad to do so, but cannot - it is the solemn duty of the remainder to stand by their arms. It is said - by some that, having been, so long held in position, near Norfolk, without an opportunity to engage the Enemy, you are disposed to re-Enlist only in view of being assigned to some other field, no ____ you may anticipate more active service; by others, that the ardent patriotism which induced you to spring into ranks - at the first call of your Country, has cooled-down, and many of you are willing to continue in service, upon condition-only-that; under some new organization, you are to obtain promotion by office; and still, by others, that you are indisposed to re-enlist until you shall have returned to your homes and rested-a-while; when you will-most probably- re-enter the Army.

I appeal to your-own manly hearts- and unbiased judgement, to answer, if I have not vindicated the 3rd Ala. Reg't by denying that either consideration could, upon calm consideration, control its action. I know the material of your organization too-well, to doubt for a moment, your response to such propositions. And I know the same spirit and purpose which impelled you to enter the Service, will induce you to continue in service, if your country calls you.

I can - and do sympathize with those accomplished soldiers - desiring - still to fight - "until the last armed foe expires," who well-deserve + pant-for higher position, where they can, more effectually, advance our glorious cause. But I admonish all such that they know-not the place where - nor the hour - when the Enemy may attack - nor need they rely upon the probability of entering the service again - if disbanded - under any more favorable circumstances. If they lay-down their arms, others will take them up. Over two thousand troops, in Alabama, now in Camps - and unarmed, will instantly + gladly seize them, and spring into the vacant ranks. We have far more men than arms, but the Salvation of the Country depends, not only upon the valor of our men, but the efficiency of the arms in their hands. Raw + untrained Volunteers may be overwhelmed, + driven in Confusion from the field, while our well-disciplined Troops, [1 word illegible] to the Camp - and familiar with the appliances of War, will stand - an impregnable wall, for the protection + defense of the Country. Our foes well understand this, and are speculating upon their chances for success, when the period of enlistment of our 12-months' troops shall have expired. One of the most influential newspapers, in the City of New-York - which has just fallen under my - Eye Says, "we hope that Gen McClellan will resist every attempt to precipitate events, before he is ready - and that the President - and his Cabinet will sustain him in his course - especially in view of the fact that, next month, The Period of enlistment, in the Southern Army, for one year, will have expired, and great numbers of the Rebels will refuse to enlist.

Great God! Can this be true? Will the brave men of Alabama fulfill this prediction of our foes? Should they retire from the field at the very hour, when the heaviest presence is made upon our lives - and when the darkest cloud is gathered for our destruction, + then, should disaster befall our Southern Sand by their abandonment of their post - they would lose - not only - the honours of past achievements but, in all human probability, meet the condemnation of the whole Country.

Having been the first Regiment from Alabama to fly to the defense of Virginia, you were promptly ordered to the most important + most dangerous post in that State; + gladly went - because you believed it to be the Post of honor + of danger. Though you have had no bloody

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The service which you have rendered the Country has been invaluable. Every day that Norfolk, with its untold treasures, has remained un-approached by the Enemy, had recorded a new victory to your arms. The material composing the 3rd Alabama Reg't the thorough training of the men - the known skill and gallantry of its officers - as well as its isolation from all other Alabama Reg'ts, have given it a distinct and proud position in the Provisional Army, a separate + [?] brilliant page in History. This is as well understood, I am assured, by the Enemy - as by our own People. And, now, when the Enemy is counting - upon our trained Volunteers within a brief period, and calculating that - them - he will be able to march - triumphantly - to our Capitol, and carry desolation to our homes - will the Gallant men of the 3rd Alabama Regiment by the first to lay-down their arms, + the proud banner entrusted to them by the glorious Women of Virginia, and turn their backs upon the Old Dominion - even within the sound of the mightiest guns of the Enemy? God forbid! No! Stand by your arms! Cluster to your loved standard - + illustrate Alabama by showing how her brave sons can suffer + die - if need be - to defend their Country. The glorious First Alabama retains its arms + its bright colors!

In a few more days, its vacant ranks will be crowded with impetuous men now rushing to Pensacola. Will not the intrepio 3rd head-off in Solid Column, + become a noble example to all other Alabama Reg'ts in old Virginia? May God inspire + steel your hearts for this high resolve!

Let not considerations of personal comfort - inglorious ease or petty ambition, mar your record, + seduce you from the field. Re-organize-! Wait not for a month - or a week - or a day! If you re-enlist now, you engage for two years - retrain your arms - your number - + your colors; and elect the officers to command you. If you suffer yourselves to be mustered out of service, wish to re-enlist after your return home, you must go-in anew, for three years - enter camps of reserves - and wait for armsorganization, + opportunity. Re-organize then, + the wings of the wind - which bears the joyful tidings homeward, shall carry back the benedictions of Alabama, to cheer your hearts, and [1 word illegible] your aims - for the great battles, which are yet to be fought and won, before the deliverance of our Country can be achieved. (Signed) [1 word illegible] Gill Shorter.

Executive Department; Montgomery - Alabama; Feb 21st 1862 "To the Corps of Cadets at the University of Alabama;"

Well-knowing the patriotic ardor which warms your bosoms at this dark- and trying hour + fearing that the dangers-impending over your local may impel you to lay-down your books, and rush impetuously- to the field - I have deemed it my duty to our Common Country, to address you a few words of Counsel and advice.

Under the late requisition of the Resident of the Confederate States I have issued my proclamationcalling for twelve additional Regiments - for three years, or the War. This call will bring into the Camps in Alabama, ten thousand men. The next great need will be to drill + discipline this force - for active service - when armed and equipped - + ready for the field. The perfection of the men in the drill and discipline of of the Camp; will be a most honorable and important work: and to this work - many of you must - shortly - be assigned. Your Employment in this manner, cannot be dispensed - with - without great detriment to the interests of State + Country.

Inasmuch, therefore, as there is abundant material to compose the comoanies called-for- and your numbers - even if half, or all were to enlist - would aid but little in the ranks of 10.000 men

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Proclamation by the Governor of Alabama Executive Department Montgomery, Alabama, Feb 12th 1862.

The President of the Confederate States has called upon the Executive of the State of Alabama - to furnish twelve additional Regiments to serve for three years - or during the War. A similar call has been made upon the other states, in proportion to their white population. This requisition is made necessary by the mighty power which the Lincoln Despotism is now putting-forth for our subjugation.

The Troops will be accepted by Companies, to be afterwards organized into Regiments. The Company + field-officers will be elected by the men, and the Rule of promotion in the Confederate Army will then apply. Convenient Camps will be established, where the Troops will rendezvous. Transportation will be furnished from the place of organization of the Companies. After their arrival in Camp, and they are mustered into service, they will be clothed-subsisted-equipped and armed by the Confederate States. Each Private, + non-commissioned officer will be entitled to a Bounty of $.50.

A Company-organization must contain one Captain - one 1st Liutenant - 2 second lieuts. - 5 Sergeants - 4 Corporals - 2 musicians; and not less than-64-nor more than 100 Privates. Few Companies will form a Reg't

When the Muster-Roll of a company has been completed by enlistments, and the Company has been organized by the Election of its officers, + is tendered to this Department; for 3 years - or the War, it will be accepted and ordered into Camp.

Alabama has never yet failed to respond to any call made upon her - for the Defense of our glorious Cause; and she will not now that her own soil has been invaded - for a moment hesitate.

The Contest in which we are engaged, has assumed a magnitude and ferocity, which makes this demand imperative. The recent bold adventures of the Enemy demonstrate that his organizations - armaments - and vales have been undervalued; and his successes will stimulate him to attempt achievements of greater daring and importance Besides the vast columns which press our frontier-lines, he is gathering his armed flotillas - to harrass our Coasts - destroy our property - and desolate our Homes. Upon the swollen-tide of the Tennessee river, he has driven his gun-boats-even-within the borders of Alabama, whose soil has - hitherto - been spared the pollution of his foot-print. His immense fleets are gathering upon her Coasts, and thousands of hired soldiers are preparing for an attack upon her only sea-port City.

Alabamians! You have been slumbering while the Enemy have been preparing for your destruction! Arouse and rally to the Defense of your Country! Let not a day or an hour be lost! Besides the brave men who have-already entered the Army - there are Seventy Thousand free men left in your State, to recruit their broken ranks and swell thier Columns.

The great battles for your deliverance are yet to be fought. The inalieable right of self-government, inherited from your fathers, and all you hold dear in life, are involved in the mighty issue. Let the call to arms ring over the State, and let the wings of the wind bear-back the Response of Ten Thousand brave me "WE COME! WE COME!" With an unwavering Confidence in the justice of their Cause - + in humble reliance upon the Omnipotent arm at their rush to the field of danger - and the triumph which awaits them.

(Signed) [1 word illegible] Gill Shorter

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59 61 Executive Department, Montgomery, Alabama, Febr 22d 1862. Brig Genl Thos J. Butler, A. M. Mobile. Sir, Your favor of 16th inst., owing to the failure of the mails did not arrive before to-day. Your remarks are carefully noted - and duly appreciated. Could I have been favoured with the pleasure of a visit to your city, on to-day, I should, most certainly, extended invitations to the officers named to join me in the intended Reviews of your Brigade.

As this pleasure has been denied me, by the late freshets, I hope it may, yet, be in my power to meet - & review your Brigade - before you enter the field of active service.

Your letter of the 18th inst. also, is at hand to-day, &, in reply to your Certificate of Elections by Volunteer-Companies of Militia, I herewith hand you Commissions - accordingly. I regret to inform you that it is not in my power to arm any of your Volunteer-Companies, at this time.

My agents - over the state - are buying - and gathering shot-guns - Rifles - and kinds which are to be had; &, where I receive them, I will do - for you whatever may be in my power. I have directed agents, in [illegible] - Alabama, to ship - to Genl D. C. Greene, who will have the arms put-in-order immediately, and issue - on your requisition.

There are no other Regiments of Volunteer-Militia - being formed in the State, other ^than^ those within the limits of your Command - so far as this Department is advised. The new Regiment, therefore, to which you have assigned Capt. Le-Baron's Company, will be No 3. c Very Resp'y, Your ob't Ser't 103 (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter.

Executive Department. Montgomery, Alabama, Febr 27th 1862 O. O. Nelson, Esqr - Tuscumbia, Ala. Sir Your favour of 22d inst. is to hand. In common with yourself - and all patriotic citizens, I deeply regret the state of things, which has interrupted the progress - on your part - of any Enterprize - which - I had hoped - would have resulted - So advantageously - to the benefit of the Confederacy.

In reply to your request for permission, "to manufacture the Guns for the State - at any point - in, or out - of the State you (we) may think best," without dwelling - for a moment - on your suggestions - as to particulars - I assure you - simply- that trusting to your judgement and experience, I, cheerfully, assent to your request - that you may remove your Works and materials to any point, where the Contract can be carried-out to the best advantage for the State of Alabama.

When you shall have perfected your re-arrangements, I shall hope to hear from you. Very Respectfully, Your Obt Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter.

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62 60 Executive Department. Montgomery, Alabama, Feby 27th 1862. Capt. Charles T. Ketchum, Mobile, Sir, I embrace the earliest opportunity to reply to yours of 20th inst. recd yesterday - or day before.

Having determined to establish a camp in Mobile, it became necessary to assign some-one to take comand - of it; which I did by appointment of Judge McKinstry, as a special aid for that purpose. The Companies rendervouzing there must be tendered - as Companies to me, and, when ten arrive in Camp, will be organized into a Regiment & then elect their field officers. If not enough Companies arrive to make a Regiment, they will be merged with other Companies - elsewhere, so as to fill-up a Regiment. We are to have large armies; and Regimental organizations must be dispatched - as rapidly as possible. It is my purpose to expedite this desirable end - by every means in my power, and, at the same time, to allow the Companies to exercise their free will - in the election of their officers.

If you think you can organize a Regiment at an early day - say by the first of April - at farthest, and it will secure that end, by my establishment of a Camp in Baldwin Co - on the Rail-Road, I will do so - & assign you, as special-aid, without compensation - to command it. This is taken - however - with the understanding, that the Companies must be tendered - for my acceptance - as Companies, &, held - subject to my order, for further organization - if ten Companies do not arrive in Camp, by 1st of April. Of course - any views - which you may have, will not be disregarded - if compatible with the good of the service. By order of Maj-Genl Bragg - the Commissary & Quarter-Master departments are directed to provide for all my Companies &c. Transportation will be furnished from the place of organization of the Company; and I have no doubt that, on application to him, he would authorize transportation also, for Squads. Awaiting further reply - I am - Very Resp'y Your ob't Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

Executive Department. Montgomery, Alabama, Febr 27th 1862. Capt. J. D. Webb. Manassas, Virginia, I am in receipt of your letter of 17th inst. and gratified at the contents. A check-in your favour, for $950, has been forwarded to Capt. Van-derveer - as requested.

I enclose a commission to David A. Walker - as suggested by you, and hope he may be transferred by the Secretary of War, to whom I enclose a letter of request - accordingly. Very Resp', Your ob't Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter.

Executive Department, Montgomery, Alabama. Feb' 27th 1862. Hon. J. P. Benhamin, Sec' of War, Sir, Under and act of the Genl assembly of the State of Alabama, I have-had-built, at Manassas, a Depôt building for the reception of supplies for Alabama Troops: and I have commissioned Lieut David A. Walker - in Company C., 5th Alabama Regiment, as assistant Commissary for Alabama, in the State service - with the rank of Captain to take charge of the establishment - I hope it will agreeable to you to transfer him to that position. Very Respectfully, Your ob't Ser't. (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter c

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63 Executive Department Montgomery, Alabama: Feb 27th 1862 David A. Walker is, hereby appointed assistant Commissary in the State Service, with the rank of Captain; and assigned to the special duty of taking-charge of the Depot - at or near Manassas - in the State of Virginia, for the reception of supplies for the Alabama Volunteers. (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter

Executive Department: Montgomery, Alabama; Feb 27th, 1862 Maj. Genl A.M. Barclay, Commd 10th Division, Ala. Mil. Tuscumbra General; Yours of the 14th did not reach me until the 25th. It affords me much pleasure to acknowledge the zeal and energy you have displayed, in the organization of your Division; and, so far as I am able to judge of the details of your orders - and the disposition of your forces, they meet with my cordial approval.

In the perilous crisis which is upon us & which we have to meet to do so with success, we mist first ascertain with something like accuracy - the extent of our resources. We know that we have no want of men. - brave - but I fear, undisciplined men. Our object must be to arm and increase their efficiency by discipline and instruction. We have to begin with Companies - must have every member enrolled who is subject to military duty - have the number and description of the Arms of each Company registered - and the returns consolidated into the Regimental Reports - have Company drills as often as possible - and Battalion - and Regimental-occasion ally. If each field - Brigade - and Division-officer will act with the same promptness and activity, which have characterized your action, much can be accomplished - even with our militia. It is the duty of every man, who has accepted position - without relation to his Rank, to exert himself to the utmost not only by his orders - but by his bearing - the example, & influence of his position, in effecting these results. Every thing which is done should contribute to the end of preparing our militia to take the field - at the shortest notice, and making their action - where called into the field - as efficient as possible. We do not want them, at this moment, in actual service, but we do want them prepared for it, when the time comes - which may be sooner than any of us now anticipate. The Confederate Government has assumed the Control, & direction of the War on the Tennessee; and it is my most earnest prayer that the invader will be driven from our soil; but I regard-it as impolitic - in view of the action of the Confederate Government for our Militia to occupy any other position than that of a reserve - or auxiliary force - prepared to co-operate - by Regiments - and go into actual service, whenever the occasion may demand.

As regards instructions which you ask - as to the Commissariat - and Quarter-master department - the condition of the State-Treasury forbids any heavy expenditure - and, indeed any expenditures of any kind - except such as are absolutely essential. Tents - and Camp - equipage can - I have reason to believe - be supplied by the Confederacy, and, if possible, powder sufficient to supply the arms of each Regiment should be obtained. The Commissaries of the Regiment on the Tennessee, should perfect every arrangement to obtain subsistence at the shortest notice, should the Regiment be called into actual service, and, generally speaking, every thing should be prepared - so that subsistence could be promptly purchased for any force or Regiment which might be ordered into the field. Powder and lead should be bought before-hand; and a due proportion made into fixed ammunition. I am glad you have purchased what you have, and should like you to obtain all you can on reasonable terms

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64 62 In relation to the two Germans - whom you have arrested for disloyalty, I hardly know what to say. I don't know what grounds of suspicion may exist against them; I have, really nothing upon which to regulate any action. There is great danger, in times of high excitement, of making serious mistakes of this kind are made with Foreigners; it is worse in its effects than with our own Citizens. All that I can say is that the arbitrary exercise of military power - in restraint of the liberty of the Citizen, although it is sometimes necessary, should always be regulated by great discretion, & prudence, and, in doubtful cases, it is, as a general rule, better that it should not be exerted at-all. The action of the civil tribunals, if it can be legitimately exerted - is preferable to martial Law - so far as citizens are concerned. Very Respectfully, Yr ob't ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

Executive Department: Montgomery, Alabama, Febr 25th 1862. Maj. W. P. Vanderveer, Dear Sir, The Governor directs me to send you the enclosed order or bill - drawn on you - in favour of J. D. Webb, for $950. 00/100, & to request that you place that amount to his credit and to notify him of the fact. Acknowledge receipt of bill & oblige Very Resp'y (Signed) Jas S. Albright Private Secy

Executive Department: Montgomery, Alabama. Feby 27th 1862. His Excellency - John Milton - Govr of Florida. Feby 27th 1862. I have received your Communication of the 20th inst. - enclosing a copy of the report of Genl R. F. Floyd - commanding at Appalachicola. I can - readily conceive the amount of injury which might result from the capture of that place, to citizens of this State - Florida and Georgia; and no one would be more willing to extend to them protection, & secure their safety than myself, were the means within my power, and it were consistent with public requirements, elsewhere. But Alabama has no State Troops - Those - originally - enlisted in her Service having been transferred to the Confederate-States' Army; and no Volunteers being now rec'd unless for the War, and who are, immediately, mustered into the Confederate service, it was concluded, after grave deliberation that the ultimate & certain success of our cause would be more speedily attained by the concerted action of all the states - through their Confederate Government, than by the irregular - & disconnected efforts of the several States - however well-directed. All the energies & resources of Alabama are now being devoted to the support of the Government - in its unequal contest ; to divert any portion of them to any other purpose - except upon some pressing emergency - where the Common welfare was at state, would endan the success of our great cause. It would be a great misfortune, should Appalachicola fall into the Enemy's hands - or the public property there be destroyed - or the Citizens be exposed to outrages - which have characterized the conduct of the Enemy. It seems to me that, to attempt with inadequate force, to hold isolated positions - unless of signal strategic importance - is to invite a disaster - similar to those which have recently befallen us. Our men - few in number - with a sufficiently-effective artillery, exposed to be attacked by the vastly superior force of the Enemy have the means of rapidly concentrating,- Should they resist- will have offered themselves - as useless sacrifices, or would be compelled to submit to a humiliating capitulation. Aside from the loss of men - cannon - & munitions

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63 65 of War, no so urgently needed, the moral effect of such reverses is extremely unfortunate. The policy of defending persons and property, as such, will have to be abandoned; our people must begin to think more of their liberty, which is at stake - and less of their property - which is endangered ; they can only save the one - by securing the other. Even if a position is entirely defensible, unless the holding-of-it contributes to the success of our cause - it dissipates our strength by dividing it. Our forces - now scattered over a vast extent of Country - hardly within supporting distance of each other - should be concentrated upon some of the great lines of defense, in heavy Columns, that could, succesfully, attack and repulse the invaders. If it be not done, they will be beaten & cut-off in detail; disaster will succeed disaster, until the whole of the South will be over-run, and we will be driven as a last resort, to that most cruel - bloody - & tedious of all Warfare - a Guerilla-War. It is not my intention to advise your Excellency to the adoption of any course, in this particular instance, but I thought it not unfitting to make this an opportunity for the expression of opinions long entertained that we might "take counsel together," in these times of peril. I have the honor to be Your ExcellencyYour Ob't Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama, March 1st 1862 Jos W. Taylor, Esqr Dear Sir, Capt. Fields has just handed me your letter of the 26th Ulto and $82 75/100 - proceeds of a series of "Tableaux vivants" given by the young ladies & gentlemen of Eutaw - contributed for the most needy Alabama Soldiers.

Capt. Fields had the misfortune to lose the socks - gloves and Comforters, by their being stolen from the State-office- or place of Deposit, in Greenesboro.'

The money will be placed to the credit of the Hospital - Fund & used for the releif of needy - sick - & wounded Soldiers of Alabama. I hope its application, in this direction, will meet the approbation of the Contributors. Be so good as to tender the young gentlemen & Ladies of Eutaw, my thanks for the contribution. Very Respectfully, (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama, March 3d 1862. Col. W. H. Chambers, & Wm H. Thorntow. Gentlemen, You are, each, hereby authorized to act for the State of Alabama, at Eufaula, in protecting the Chattahoochie against the encroachments of the Enemy. You will co-operate with the authorities of Columbus - and other Towns. Accompany the Engineer and others on the River, to select points for obstructing & defending, and do all other things that may be deemed necessary & proper to accomplish the object aforesaid. Yours, Resp'y (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

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66 64 Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama, March 3d, 1862. De L. C. Garland, Prest Univy of Ala. Tuscaloosa. Sir, On the 21st ulto. I addressed a letter to the Corps of Cadets, at the University, advising of the decision of this Department upon the subject of their enlistment in the Army. It has, further, occurred to me, as not inappropriate, to make an appeal, also, to the officers - both scholastic & military - attached to the University - to remain at their posts, where, in my judgement, they are rendering the State & Country more important and valuable service than they possibly could perform in any other position.

Teachers of youth - the future stay and dependence of our Government, and the Church - whether they be professors in Colleges - or superintendents of of Village - or Country school-rooms are, by the Military Law of the State, wisely, exempted from Military duty and drill - except in an extreme emergency - when it might become necessary to order, into active - & immediate service - every available man. They are, likewise exempted - and shall be - from every draft which may have to be ordered. These considerations have so impressed my mind, in view of our present condition, that I find myself compelled - through an address to you, to assure the officers of the University of my high appreciation of their patriotic Services - in their accustomed spheres, and to, earnestly request that they will remain at their posts, and faithfully - as they heretofore have done, labor for the continued usefulness of the University over which you have the honor to preside. Yr ob't Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

Executive Department; Montgomery, Alabama, March 3d, 1862. Dr L. C. Garland President of the University of Alabama Tuscaloosa Sir, Your suggestions - as to making Cartridges are approved. You will buy powder and lead at such prices, as in your discretion will be proper, and have the Cartridges prepared for the use of the Corps of Cadets, to be used with such oeconomy[?] as you see necessary - at this time. And, if the materials can be had, you will oblige me by having Cartridges made for the State. Powder (Rifle) is selling - at home- from $1¢ to $2¢ per pound - lead - from 15 to 25 cents. I am buying - within these limits, through my agents. I will thank you, also, to have guns repaired by your machinists and rifles bored - if practicable: I mean the arms purchased by the State's agent - in your County. Those large enough should have the bore of the Mississippi Rifle - 33 or 34 to the Lb - smaller ones the bore of Colt's repeaters. I enclose you another check for $1500. 00 which you will see applied to payment for arms purchase and delivered - To this account you will also place cost & charges for ammunition. I will make further remittance - when advised that it may be needed. Very Resp'y Your ob't Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter. c

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65 67 Executive Department Montgomery, Alabama, March 4th 1862 Hon. J. P. Benjamin, Sec of War: Sir,

In response to my proclamation for twelve new regiments, our people are volunteering very favorably; and I hope to have a number of regiments in Camp, in a few weeks. The Contest for positions, by patriotic and ambitious men, will cause some little delay, which, though much to be regretted - cannot be avoided, under the Rule for the Election of officers.

I am accepting Cavalry for one Regiment only, and urging the men to arm with double-barrel shot guns, but fear many cannot be had. They must have sabres - which the Confederacy will furnish. Capt. Wagner - Ordnance - officer here - should have them ready, in two or three weeks, and saddles and other equipments. They should have pistols - if possible. And now - my dear Sir - as Pensacola is to be abandoned - and all the land. Troops to be removed from Mobile - will you not furnish arms for my infantry-regiments - and let them go to Mobile, as fast as I can organize them? The knowledge or assurance of this fact would greatly stimulate enlistments. So soon as our people learn that our Gulf-Coast is abandoned to the Enemy, they will become greatly excited, and prompt supply of arms will tend - largely - to re-assure the people. We are destitute here-now, having sent, out of the State - all the public arms the State had, and contributed them - with our brave troops - to the Common Cause.

I feel most profoundly - the misfortunes which have recently befallen our arms - and the imperious ncessity of recovering our losses - in Tennessee and Kentucky; and Alabama will bend all her energies to meet the demands upon her patriotism; but, at the same time, as far as it is within the power of the Confederate Government, I earnestly insist upon every possible contribution for the defense of Mobile, and the Alabama River. There is an element of population bordering this river and its tributaries, which it is of vital importance to preserve intact.

I have established several camps in South-Alabama, and two - in North Alabama - one at Huntsville, & one at La Grange. A quarter-master & commissary should be posted at Huntsville, immediately, and supplies of Clothing sent thither without delay. I beg you, also, to have shipped - here, immediately, clothing for 5000 men. The State can furnish jackets and pants for several thousand, and will aid - as far as in her power, to clothe all. I hope that the proper officers of the War-Department will give these matters prompt attention; and I, further ask instructions to the Confederate officers here, to respond - efficiently - & promptly - to my requisitions - in aid of the organizations in progress. Very Respy Your ob't Ser't (Signed) Jno Gill Shorter c

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