1 - December 1902 Vo1.1 No.2

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Second issue of the Western University student literary journal.

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us of his "delight" and "unfeigned pleasure" in occupying so honourable a post on so memorable an occasion, and then and - and then - he suddenly resolved to reserve the remainder of his well written speech, and called upon the Principal to respond to the toast of "The King". At this we all jumped up, seized our glasses, clinked them and loyally drank - lemonade - then as loyally gasped the National Anthem - gasped, because we had supped off that roast-turkey, etc, not wisely but too well.

The Principal rose, with an air of "as I could if I would" tell you many things about the King and then told us how once when he had been arguing rather too strongly with his Majesty (and that before a lot of other Royalties) the King to shew his appreciation of the Principal's arguments, wanted to put a sovereign in the hat which was being passed round for the Principal's benefit. But the man in charge of the hat, thinking the King was annoyed,

Last edit over 1 year ago by Jannyp
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didn't hand him the hat, where at the Royal Face became very red and looked displeased; likewise the Principal, seeing what the giddy man had done, felt jolly bad, also became red and looked displeased because - he didn't get his Sovereign's sovereign! At this we laughed and clapped our hands, and the Principal resumed his seat and wouldn't tell us any more stories. Then, because he wouldn't, our chairman told us to have another drink because he was going to ask the Provost to tell us something about the "Arts Faculty"

Dr. James, having supped rather heartily rose rather slowly, smiled on us rather tenderly and said very deliberately that as he wouldn't talk about great Kings, he would say a few words about great things; but seeing that we had all, like himself, supped unstintingly he feared we couldn't digest his great thoughts and our supper simultaneously: therefore he would speak in a

Last edit over 1 year ago by PatriciaAntonelli
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light vein, within our comprehensive, and straightway spoke of the efforts of the Faculty, in bygone days, in stuffing birds, cats and foxes with great credit. Then he said the Principal had come to help the giddy Faculty to do the jolly stuffing a bit better. He also said that the prospects of the Western University were brighter now than they had ever been, and begged to suggest that a little fresh paint applied to the verandahs, doors, and window sills, and a few more flower-beds on the lawn would make the prospects still brighter.

No sooner was Dr. James reseated than the chairman invited us to drink again, as Archdeacon Davis was about to commence an oration. Like Dr. James, the Archdeacon couldn't say much about Kings so he told us stories about Bishops - of this diocese too. One of them, we understood him to say was a boary-headed old sinner who went to and fro in the diocese seeking what he might devour, and

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that once having devoured all he could get, he lay all night in the snow, singing "we won't go home till morning". No wonder poor Bishop Baldwin has such a lot of trouble getting things straight now.

Mr. Sage responded to "the British Empire" and in so doing bore us across British seas on British ships, to battles fought and won by British troops, and again we heard the British trumpets blare, and the fierce British battle-cry - thus vented he the fullness of his wellfed heart, he shook his raven locks and seemed like a warhorse to scent the battle from afar. Then he cooled off and talked of English lanes, conjuring up visions of pale primroses, violets, buttercups, daisies, may blossom and bluebells on their banks; golden gorse, wild rose, tapering pink foxgloves and feathery ferns in their overhanging hedges; the songs of many birds, memories of lingering longer walks, the ripple of merry voices the seats beneath the shade for talking age and

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whispering lovers made, etc, etc, oh Mr. Sage, why, oh why did you talk thus!!!

To remove the sentimental effect of Mr. Sage's oratory, Dr. Tamblyn rose in the sweetness of his youth, and grew ardent over remembrances of barbarian days at Toronto; telling us of the sanguinary pleasures practised there - how men were picked up in sections, an eye here, a tooth there, and a piese of a leg elsewhere. Then the doctor heaved a great sigh, whether because he longed for those sweet times to come again, or because he had fled from that unholy Egypt into this calm Canaan we could not tell, but from what Mr. Carlisle afterwards told us about Toronto we concluded it was because he had found rest for his little role here, in decent society. After telling us to be good, the doctor sat down.

The next speaker made us Freshmen feel very small and full of awe, for he was none other

Last edit almost 2 years ago by Jannyp
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