Susan Robertson

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Two-page letter on folded sheet, dated Feb. 11th, 1849. Addressed to "Dear Cousen" and signed Susan Robertson, Stephen M. Whitney. Susan is probably writing from Saratoga Springs, New York, to her cousin, Charly, somewhere in Dutchess County, New York. ** Please note that historical materials in the Gold Rush Collections may include viewpoints and values that are not consistent with the values of the California State Library or the State of California and may be considered offensive. Materials must be viewed in the context of the relevant time period, but views are in no way endorsed by the State Library. The California State Library’s mission is to provide credible information services to all Californians and, as such, the content of historical materials should be transcribed as it appears in the original document.

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cam_SusanRobertson_B017_F014_001A

Feb the 11 1849

Dear Cousen [Cousin]

Do not think I have forgoten [forgotten] you by my not writing to you before let me asure [assure] you I have not or ever will I did not Return to the Springs as soon as I expected I staid [stayed] to Sandy Hill until the 20 of January I was afflicted with the tooth ache for it long time I injoyed [enjoyed] myself quit [quite] well and Should if I could have had your letter but Believe me Dear Cousen [Cousin] I delayed no time when I got here to go to the offace [office] and was very happy to find A letter from you with A Joyfull [Joyful] heart I broke the Seal and was happy to hear that you was in good health for with out [without] it we are poor mortals for good health and good companey [company] makes this life very agreeable for my part I am verry [very] fond of both and If I could have the company of my friends I should be very glad but as I can not it is A great pleasure to think that though we we are far A part [apart] yet we can converse with eithe each other with the pen it is A pleasure for me to write to one that I esteem as Dear as I do you but I should be happyer [happier] to See you but Alas I can not so I must content myself by writing to you and hope if we live we Shall See each other before long for I can truly say I injoyed [enjoyed] usayr your company much when in Old Dutchess Dear Cos I comenced [commenced] this the 11 and now it is the 14 and I try to finish it do excuse me for I have for I have bin [been] quit [quite] bisey [busy] to worke [work] and that is not all I have made A Bargesia [bargain] to go to California with A young man in the next ship that sails I thought best to let you Know I think I shall not go & with out [without] Cousin first calling for you so I will bring A Lady for you the more the merryer [merrier] we will be

Last edit 2 months ago by California State Library
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She is first best her eyes is blue and bright her hair is the coler color of yours I think and she will do well A diging [digging] Gold Charly and I will help if the lump is to [too] heavy for you to manage do not go off now A lone [lone] but it is time for me to go to bed for sleep is A getting in my eyes so I will winde [wind] up is my yard

O Stue Cousen [Cousin] I mean do you not wish we was to Mr Wesleys [Wesley's] to night [tonight] then you could hold the Ball and Brake the yard to it can not be you have forgoten [forgotten] that evening we spent there on the last events we was together to Mrs Smith O That was the last but the parting Kiss is warm on my cheeke [cheek] yet is it not on yours [your's] but I hope we will all meet there A ag ag gain [again] for Aunt Polly must have some more greeting gain for I can train and quite to as for your geting [getting] Married it is time enophe [enough] yet Do not be in A hurry but take your time I Shall for the chaff must go before the wheat and you are young yet so take the world easey [easy] n on that part hunt for Deer not for coon good night do write Soon for I want to hear from you and I will answer it Sooner the for I Shall visit Postffice [Post office] often for we can write if we can not See each other all the friends is well do write I Remain your Sincere and ever affectnate [affectionate] cousen [cousin]

Susan Robertson Stephen M Whitney

Last edit 2 months ago by California State Library
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