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Allen, a heavy serious man, told us
he wanted to leave Mississippi, but had
his family and elderly parents to support.
When his parent died, he would
leave.

During the week of January 19,
1964, Allen's mother died. A brother
who lives in Milwaukee came down
for the funeral and persuaded Allen
to leave. He had been arrested twice
since the Lee shooting, and once a
deputy, swinging a flashlight, broke
his jaw.

He made plans to leave on February
1, early in the morning . He wold go
to Milwaukee, live with his brother,
get a job and send for his family.

On the night of January 31, around
8:30, his wife heard him drive up. His
truck stopped, but she assumed he had
gotten out to close the gate. She heard
three shots, but still didn't leave the
house because the truck's motor kept
going.

When it stopped, at 1:30 A.M.,
Louis Allen's body was found under it.
He had been shot three times with a
shotgun, once in the face so badly his
coffin was kept closed at the funeral.

Newspaper reporters, pondering an
angle for the shooting, wondered if
Louis Allen had been "active" in the
rights drive.

"He had tried to register once," a
SNCC worker said, "and had seen a
white man murder a Negro who tried
In south Mississippi, that made him
active."

(Continued from page 11

appalling photograph and he said
"somebody might have slapped him"
I can't imagine why a deputy or jailor
should slap Mr. Long, except out of
distate for his career in the Deep South
liberation. If he went bersek, a jailor

14 NEW SOUTH

Notes and Questions

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wnmartin

I stopped transcribing (about 4/5th of the way down the left colum) because there were a couple blank lines and the "(Continued from page 11)",
so I assumed the further text was from an article that started before the Bond article (which began on page 12).