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Allie Armengol at Sep 26, 2020 04:39 PM

17

4 - Julian Bond - draft 2

before we submit to such . . . ?"

As usual, a redskinned moderate in the crowd
He was answered the moderate [illegible] "Let us submit our grievances,
whatever they may be, to the Congress of the United State . . . . "

This debate took place in 1812.

Neither tactic worked.

And now after 350 years of white [illegible]
the
Indians, Blacks, Spanish-speaking - still struggle to rid their
backs of the white mans burden.
The kind of hard alternative posed by Tecumseh
and debated by the more moderate [illegible] in more modern ghettos,
barrios and reservations. It rages because two hundred years
after the "Founding Fathers" proposed to dissolve Americas'
differences in a melting pot, only we [illegible]
unabsorbed. And now many of us no longer wish to
melt, to be absorbed, to fit in, to join up, to flow into the national
mainstream.

But black people - and Spanish-Americans and the original
Americans - do insist on sharing in the abundance of the land [illegible] owned or worked.

We simply wish an opportunity to live the decent life.

17

4 - Julian Bond - draft 2

before we submit to such . . . ?"

As usual, a redskinned moderate in the crowd
He was answered the moderate [illegible] "Let us submit our grievances,
whatever they may be, to the Congress of the United State . . . . "

This debate took place in 1812.

Neither tactic worked.

And now after 350 years of white [illegible]
the
Indians, Blacks, Spanish-speaking - still struggle to rid their
backs of the white mans burden.
The kind of hard alternative posed by Tecumseh
and debated by the more moderate [illegible] in more modern ghettos,
barrios and reservations. It rages because two hundred years
after the "Founding Fathers" proposed to dissolve Americas'
differences in a melting pot, only we [illegible]
unabsorbed. And now many of us no longer wish to
melt, to be absorbed, to fit in, to join up, to flow into the national
mainstream.

But black people - and Spanish-Americans and the original
Americans - do insist on sharing in the abundance of the land [illegible] owned or worked.

We simply wish an opportunity to live the decent life.