1871-1900 Yaquina Head Lighthouse Letter books

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p-1 1881 YH Descriptive Pamphlet

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11 Area in timber or shrubbery. None Area susceptible of profitable cultivation. About one acre. Area cultivated or prepared for cultivation. About one acre. Character of adjacent surrounding country—soil sandy, clay, marsh, swamp, wood, fast ground, or shifting sands. The soil is a dark clayey loam, covered with grass. No shrubbery or trees. Distance to the nearest post office. Five miles Distance to the nearest village or town. Five miles to Newport on Yaquina Bay Facilities for reaching the light-station by public conveyance. None Facilities for reaching the light-station by private conveyance from the nearest village, town, railroad station, or steamboat landing, and the distance. The light station can be reached from the town of Newport on Yaquina Bay. Distance five miles. Water For Drinking and Domestic Uses Generally. How procured. From the roof of keeper’s dwelling. Quality. Good Quantity ample of not for the station at all seasons of the year. Ample Liable or not to be injured by the inroads of storm tides and seas. Not liable to injury by storm tides and seas. If rain water in tanks or cisterns, what precautions have been taken to insure its purity. The water is stored in brick underground cisterns. They are usually cleaned out once a year. Capacity of tanks or cisterns, and where placed. One cistern, capacity 11,000 gallons, placed near the rear of keeper’s dwelling. Tanks or cisterns—of what materials made. One under-ground cistern built of brick and cement.

Last edit over 2 years ago by Wjhoward
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12 If from a well, describe and give depth. Diameter. Lined or not. Water obtained by pump or bucket. Distance from keeper’s dwelling. Pump: W.B. Douglas No. 2 closed spout kitchen assistant’s quarters “ “ “ No. 2 “ “ “ Keeper’s “ A.V.W. Donald/Outage No. 2 Kitchen spout outside cistern east side The sewing co. No. 4 “ “ “ “ “ west “ Health Of The Light-Station And Vicinity. General opinion in regard to the healthiness or unhealthiness of the light-station and vicinity. The general opinion is that it is good. Diseases—what are the most prevalent at the station and in the vicinity. No prevalent diseases of the station or in the vicinity. Do they prevail at particular seasons of the year or not? Are there any local causes, such as swamps, marshes, etc., in the immediate vicinity of the lighthouse which are likely to be the cause of these diseases?

Last edit over 2 years ago by Wjhoward

p-1 1910 YH Descriptive Pamphlet

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Dwellings For Keepers—Continued. 155. Character of adjacent surrounding country—Soil, sandy, clay, marsh, swamp, wood, fast ground, or shifting sands: Sandy Water For Fog Signal, Drinking, And Domestic Uses Generally. 156. how procured, From roofs 157. Quality, Good 158. Quantity ample or not for the station at all seasons of the year, Sufficient 159. Liable or not to be injured by the inroads of storm tides and seas, Not liable 160. If rain water in tanks or cisterns, what precautions have been taken to insure its purity? Brick filter walls 161. Capacity of tanks or cisterns, and where placed: 1 cistern 11,000 gal., 1 cistern 11850 gal., 1 redwood tank at barn 3,000 gal. 162. Tanks or cisterns—Of what material made: Brick, cement lined 163. Is there a distilling apparatus at the station? No Name of maker:______________; Capacity,___________________; when installed,_______________; condition,_________; Efficiency,_____________________ 164. If from a well, describe and give depth: _________________________________________ 165. Diameter, _________________________________________________________________ 166. Lined or not, _______________________________________________________________ 167. Water obtained by pump or bucket, By pump in Keeper’s dwelling 168. Distance from keeper’s dwelling, _______________________________________________

Last edit over 2 years ago by bbarker
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Healthfulness Of The Light-Station And Vicinity. 169. General opinion in regard to the healthfulness or unhealthfulness of the light=station and vicinity: Good 170. Diseases—what are most prevalent at the station and in the vicinity? None 171. Do they prevail at particular seasons of the year, or not? ___________________________ 172. Are there any local causes, such as swamps, marshes, etc., in the immediate vicinity of the lighthouse which are likely to be the cause of these diseases? None 173. Would draining or other artificial means employed on the light-house premises be likely to improve the sanitary condition of the light-station? No

Landing, Wharf, Boathouse, And Road To The Light-House. 174. Describe: Landing on beach about 500 feet easterly of tower

Last edit over 2 years ago by bbarker

1870-73 Lighthouse Board Annual Reports

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1873 Jan. 3

From Engineer Secretary Major G. H. Elliot. To Major H. M. Robert, Corps Engineers.

Sir: The Board has been infromed that on the 30th of September last, cisterns were built by you at New Dungenness Light House (the Keeper being in great need of water as previously reported by you) and that no pipes or other arrangements were made connecting them with the roof surfaces by means of which they were expected to be filled and that two months afterward, that is on the 30th of November last, the connections had not yet been made.

The Board desires that you will at once cause the connections to be ade, and that you will forthwith discharge the foreman of the party who left the work in this condition.

Jan. 3.

From Engineer Secretary Major G. H. Elliot. To Major H. M. Robert Corps Engineers.

Sir: On the 5th of November last, you informed this Office that the lantern for Cape Foulweather had not been received, and the Engineer of the 12th District was directed to make search for it in San Francisco. the Board has heard nothing from you on the subject since, and you will at once report to this Office by letter whether you have or have not received it.

Jan. 4.

From Engineer Secretary Major G. H. Elliot. To Major H. M. Robert Corps Engineers.

Sir: In reply to your letter of the 16th December relating to the fog signal at Cape Flattery, I have to say that after your workmen left the Station

Last edit over 2 years ago by Wjhoward
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1873.

states that there was still no damper in the smoke pipe; that there was required an umbrella and jacket to protect the machines from the weather; and that the smoke-pipe was still to the seaward of the whistle.

It thus appears that one of the most important aids to navigation on the Pacific Coast, was left in an unfinished state when a Notice to Mariners had been published that it would be in operation at a specified time; that the smoke-pipe had not been placed on the land side as the slightest consideration would have suggested; and that by the use of salt water without special provision for it, the signal would have been ruined and stopped in a little while, and in a position so remote that it might have required weeks to repair it, to the great danger of life and property.

The Board desires that you at once discharge from the Light House service the foreman who was in charge of the construction of the signal at Cape Flattery; that you make requisition on the Inspector of the 12th and 13th Light House Districts for the services of the lampist and authorized by the general order of July 6th, 1872; and that you will without delay put the station in thorough order.

Jan. 6.

From Engineer secretary Major G. H. Elliot. To Majro H. M. Robert. Corps Engineers.

Sir: Your Notice to Mariners of Cape Foulweather Light House, Oregon, dated the 16th December last, is received, and I have to inform you that it contains a serious error in the position of the Light House which if it had not been discovered in this Office

Last edit over 2 years ago by LauraP
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1873 Jan. 29 From Engineer Secretary Major G.H. Elliot To Major H.M. Robert Corps Engineers

Sir: Referring to the matter of Cape Foulweather Light you are requested to telegraph the new for lighting as soon as possible: but do not light the station until you receive orders from the Board so to do.

The places for floor lights must be temporarily covered to exclude drafts.

Feb. 4 From Engineer Secretary Major G.H. Elliot To Major H.M. Robert Corps Engineers

Your telegram of third instant is not understood

Feb. 12 From Engineer Secretary Major G.H. Elliot To Major H.M. Robert Corps Engineers

Sir Your letter of the 23rd January last asking authority to hire a Superintendent of Construction at $200 per month is received

The Board is of the opinion that for the very small number of Light Houses and new works in your District a Superintendent of Construction (assistant Engineer) is not required especially at the high salary you mention. Such a person could not be expected to Superintend in person each week and case of repair for ordinarily you have several in progress at the same time, and it is supposed that competent mechanics as overseers of works could be hired at $125 to $150 per month for each new construction, and that for your repairs one such would

Last edit over 2 years ago by Friends of Yaquina Lighthouses

Coast Guard District narrative histories 1945

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CONSOLIDATION OF LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE AND COAST GUARD IN 13TH NAVAL DISTRICT

When the Lighthouse Service consolidated with the Coast Guard in 1939, there were 1,362 aids to navigation in the district including 31 major light stations, four lightships, 133 fog signals, 12 radio beacons, 672 minor light stations, including lighted buoys, and 676 unlighted buoys and daymarks. The oldest of the major light stations were Cape Disappointment and New Dungeness, which were completed in 1856 as the first activity of the Lighthouse Service in the Pacific Northwest.

Three-hundred and forty-seven Lighthouse personnel were employed in the Seattle District at the time of the consolidation. It was appreciated and understood that there was a natural reluctance on the part of the personnel to transfer from the Bureau to another service. To overcome the hesitation the transfer was effected by avoiding discharges whenever possible and making reductions in personnel by not filling vacancies which were in effect at the time of the transfer.

Superintendents of the former Lighthouse Districts became assistants to the District Commanders of the Coast Guard Districts for the administration and operation of the lighthouse functions. On November 13, 1939, the Superintendent and one clerk transferred from the Portland Lighthouse Service Office, 17th Lighthouse District, to the Seattle District Coast Guard Office (then in the Federal Building at the foot of Marion Street). The remainder of the Portland Office staff reported for duty on the morning of December 18, 1939. On that same day, the former superintendent of the 17th Lighthouse District was commissioned a commander in the United States Coast Guard to serve as Chief of Staff under the District Coast Guard Officer.

Of the personnel transferred, there were 70 keepers in residence on the stations in 1939. During the war, this number increased to 176 on these stations because of the fact that unskilled men inducted into the service had not had the training, background nor interest in the stations which had been common to the men earlier assigned there. Furthermore, the work at the station increased during the war years; Coastal Lookout units with their dogs and horses were generally located on Station grounds. This necessitated turning the dwellings of the Keepers into barracks to quarter the increased personnel and building kennels, stables and shelters for equipment. The end of the war began the gradual reduction of the stations to their normal peactime complements. -22-

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It was the intention of the Coast Guard to make the most possible use of RADAR and other electronics devices in order to increase the efficiency of its public services. One shore base installation was established and two installations were tentatively scheduled to be used as an experimental setup to determine whether necessary coverage could be provided for air-sea rescue operation.

The District Coast Guard Officer of each District was directed to investigate the possible application of shore based RADAR to the particular problems of his district. Consideration was given to the need of air-sea rescue to provide warning of potential or real distress, to determine the assistance to possible control of shipping in and around harbors and the use of RADAR as a supplementary aid for coastal lookout as well as in checking the position of navigational or any other applications which would increase the efficiency of Coast Guard functions. Results of these investigations by the District Coast Guard Officer were submitted to Headquarters in order that no phase of application be overlooked in the overall study.

The end of the war found the District not only operating fourteen RACON stations but a new electronic aid, LORAN, with stations at Cape Blanco, Oregon; Point Grenville, Washington; and Spring Island, Vancouver, B. C. A Monitor Station for LORAN had been set up at Yaquina Head, Oregon. Installation and supervision of LORAN was controlled entirely by Headquarters. However, on survey trips to determine sites for the various stations, representatives of the District Coast Guard Officer, 13th Naval District, had been present. The original installations at the aforementioned stations were temporary, in that they were mobile units, contracts having been let to private industry for the construction of permanent stations. The Aids to Navigation Office distributed 1500 temporary LORAN navigation charts covering the coast from Cape Blanco to Spring Island to Army, Navy, and Canadian Air Stations, as well as to innumerable warships.

CAMOUFLAGE OF LIGHT STATIONS

Early in the war, the Commandant, 13th Naval District, ordered the concealment of painting of ten of the Light Stations that were near military areas or war industries. The walls were "toned down" with gray and the space under the eaves painted black to accentuate the silouette of the station as it appeared from the water. (Tongue Point Repair Base was provided with a camouflage net to cover the wharves where vari-colored buoys and markers were stored. This base was in the vicinity of the Naval Air Station, Astoris, and the work was done in conjunction with assistance from that activity). Army activities near Coast Guard

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Last edit over 2 years ago by Wjhoward
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LIGHT STATIONS

The "romance" of the old Lighthouse has been lost, for the most part, by the mechanization of the lights and the modernization of related equipment. Isolated lighthouse sites have radio or telephone communication, motor launches, and electrically operated lights or signals. The oil lantern has been superceded and supplemented by radio aids - raidobeacons, RADAR beacons and LORAN. In addition to the lights' rays, there are "pips" and "blips" and "pulses" to guide the mariner to safety. However, though these electronic aids be far more reaching and provide greater accuracy than the light, they can never instill the same warm rush of relief and thanksgiving that fills the sailor's heart when the first pale rays of a familiar light beacon breaks through the fog and rain after anxious hours on a stormy sea.

When the Lighthouse Service consolidated with the Coast Guard, 31 major light stations were among the facilities transferred to the Seattle District.¹ Many of these Light Stations had tales of heroism, danger and tragedy woven into their histories. The oldest of these stations were the lights at Cape Disappointment and New Dungeness, completed in 1856 as the first activity of the Lighthouse Service in the new frontier - the Pacific Northwest.

The New Dungeness Lighthouse was built in 1857 on a spit off the south shore of the Strait of Juan de Fuca near the entrance to Puget Sound. Cape Disappointment Beacon was constructed on the only headland of the low beach between Tillamook Head and Point Grenville (80 miles), on the north point of the entrance to the Columbia River. The following year, another lighthouse was erected on Tatoosh Island just off the tip of Cape Flattery. The Island had previously been used as a whaling station and fishing headquarters by the Indians who had been, until then, the sole inhabitants. Before the Lighthouse was built, a blockade was established and muskets furnished to the workmen as protection against marauding Indians. The first Keeper of the station resigned because of the "annoyances" he and the other 3 white men suffered at the hands of the 250 Indians living there. Because of the treacherous waters and shoals, the easiest access to the Island was by a huge basket. In calm weather, boats could land on the beach but the basket method was the more dependable. This was by no means a "primitive" devise, for the basket and its hoist are still the best means to effect a landing.

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In the quite rapid succession, Umpqua River, Willapa Bay, Smith Island, Ediz Hook, Cape Arago, Cape Blanco, Point No Point, Point Wilson, and Yaquina Bay Lighthouses were built. In 1879, construction began on the Tillamook Rock Beacon.

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse was one of the most famous as well as one of the most exposed stations in the Lighthouse Service, set on a great precipitous rock lying a mile offshore from Tillamook Head on the Oregon Coast. A dark cloud of ill omen shadowed the station as, in the landing of the construction party, the superintendent was swept by a great wave into the sea and drowned. Almost insurmountable obstacles faced the engineers, for the entire top of the rock mass had to be blasted level to provide space for the lighthouse and its accompanying structures. Heavy seas continually washed over the Rock carrying away half finished foundations, equipment and endangering the lives of the entire work party. Although the light stood 133 feet above the water, on many occasions tremendous waves swept completely over the station carrying large fragments of rock which caused considerable damage to the station. On one such occasion, a rock weighting 135 pounds was hurled through the roof of the building and into the quarters below, causing extensive damage. Another time, the sea tossed a boulder through the lantern, extinguished the light and flooded the dwelling below.

West Point, built in 1881, Alki Point and Brown Point, built in 1887 and Destruction Island, built in 1891, were the next light stations to be erected. Here again, at Destruction Island, treacherous seas made landings difficult except in calm weather, so the "basket" and boom were again called upon for safe landings on the station. 14 other lighthouses were established in the Seattle District, the last being the Lim Kiln structure in 1914. Strangely enough, the Lime Kiln Lighthouse was the last light station in the District operating an oil lantern. An attempt was made to electrify the light by extending commercial power to the Station but the Power Company was unable to furnish sufficient current; in the same regard, poles had to be set in a solid rock and the cost and labor for this were almost prohibitive. A request was made for Headquarters' approval to install a power plant at the unit but this was not commensurate with Headquarters' policy so the light remained an incandescent oil vapor type. This type, familiarly known as i.o.v., gave good service although its range could not match that of the newer electric light. The old i.o.v. light came in two sizes and was approximately equivalent

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Last edit over 2 years ago by Wjhoward
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to the 350 watt and 750 watt electric lamps of today; this limitation permitted slight variation in the range of the lighted beacons. The lenses increased and magnified the light as they revolved to produce a flashing effect.

Reminicenses of the Lighthouse men who tended these lights during the years when the Northwest was, for the most part, a mountainous wilderness, make interesting listening. Even after the invention of railroads, telephones and the automobile, trips to coastal Light Stations involved travel by boat, stage and horseback. Stage drivers informed passengers before the journey began, that there was no guarantee that the stage could complete the trip, in which event, the traveller made the remainder of his journey on foot. Seasonal rains, washouts, and the miserable conditions of the "roads" (deer trails, or Indian paths) made such stipulations a necessity. Today's brief trip from Bandon to Cape Blanco, Oregon, can be made either way in a fraction of an hour; earlier travellers spent three days; The uncertainty of transportation was illustrated in the following anecdote: An engineer of the Lighthouse Service was called to Destruction Island to repair the boilers. A buoy tender took the engineer to the Island and he requested that the tender return on Friday to pick him up. Friday came - and went; another Friday - no tender; a third Friday - and in the distance the curl of a tender's smoke was seen on the horizon (in those days the smoke trails of the various type ships identified them to the men whose idle hours were spent watching the horizon for the vessels that occasionally appeared there.) When the Master of the tender was admonished for his tardiness, he replied, "You said to come on Friday; isn't this Friday?". Time was of little import.

Life on the Light Stations until the middle thirties was a world of its own. Because of their locations there were no telephone facilities, and commercial electric power did not reach to the outposts. There were generally two keepers and their families assigned to each station and the competition for the most tidy and efficient station among the keepers was keen. A few of the isolated stations at Tillamook Rock, Destruction Island, Cape Flattery, etc. had four or five keepers, one on continuous liberty rotation. With the installation of radiobeacons at many of the stations, it became necessary to bring in commercial electric power or generate power at the station. With electricity available, the i.c.v. light was superceded, the fog signals mechanized, and the comforts of the keeper's dwellings increased. Telephone service or radio-telephone service soon followed as

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the construction of roads by the State Highway Departments made the outlying stations more readily accessible.

Seventy keepers were in residence on the Stations when the Lighthouse Service was consolidated with the Coast Guard in 1939. During the war, this number had increased to 176 on these stations. The increase was due, primarily, to the fact that unskilled men inducted into the Service had not the training, background, nor interest in the Station which was common to the men earlier assigned there. Furthermore, the work at the station increased during the war years; Coastal Lookout units with their dogs and horses were generally located on Station grounds. this necessitated turning the dwellings of the Keepers into barracks to quarter the increased personnel and building kennels, stables and shelters for equipment. The end of the war began the gradual reduction of the Stations to their normal peacetime complements.

Early in the war, the Commandant, 13th Naval District, ordered the concealment of ten of the Light Stations that were near military areas or war industries. The walls were "toned down" with gray and the space under the eaves painted black to accentuate the silouette of the Station as it appeared from the water. (Tongue Point Repair Base was provided with a camouflage net to cover the wharves where vari-colored buoys and markers were stored. This Base was in the vicinity of the Naval Air Station, Astoria, and the work was done in conjunction with assistance from that activity.) Army activities near Coast Guard units furnished the paint for camouflaging the structures. The last of the stations was returned to its normal peace time color by the end of the summer, 1945. (See sixth page for camouflage technique)

A continuous lookout adwatch was maintained by the Keepers of New Dungeness, Ediz Hook, Slip Point and Cape Flattery Lighthouses beginning, strangely enough, 6 December, 1941. All vessels, aircraft, or any suspicious activity (such as attempts at communications between persons on shore (such as attempts at communications between persons on shore and unidentified vessels) were reported to Naval Section Base at Port Angeles and the Harbor Defense, Fort Worden. This order directed that persons engaged in suspicious activity should be apprehended and taken into custody. However, this directive was rescinded and, rather than take such individuals into custody, observers notified the nearest Army or Navy intelligence who took the necessary action.

Drills in the use of the gas mask were held at all Light Stations and a course in Chemical Warfare was complusory

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for 16 months before it was decided that the only possible means of returning her to her station was by hauling her overland through the woods and launching her in the Columbia River. The No. 50 was constructed of wood and remained in service only until 1909 when she was replaced by the steel-hulled lightship.

During the amalgamation of the Lighthouse Service and The Coast Guard in 1939, four lightships, the COLUMBIA RIVER LIGHTSHIP 393, the UMATILLA REEF LIGHTSHIP #88, the RELIEF LIGHTSHIP #92 and the SWIFTSURE LIGHTSHIP #113, were transferred to the Coast Guard. These four lightships maintained only three stations as the RELIEF LIGHTSHIP #92 was used on all stations as relief. They were steel-hulled vessels with a displacement of approximately 685 tones and a complement of 3 to 6 officers and 5 to 11 crew. All but one was built around 1908; the SWIFTSURE LIGHTSHIP #113 was the newest and it was completed in 1929. In addition to exhibiting a bright beacon light, the lightships were also equipped with sound signals, [radio]], radio-telephone, and radiobeacons. In addition to their regular duties as lightships, they were also instructed during the early days of the war, to notify the Commandant, 13th Naval District of all vessels passing the Columbia River northbound.

At the outbreak of the war, LIGHTSHIPS NO. 88 and 113, were removed from their stations by the Navy and replaced by lighted whistle buoys. The ships were reconverted by removing the radiobeacon and antenna mast, by installing armament, by realtering radio facilities and by increasing the complement to 30 Coast Guardsmen and 5 Coast Guard Officers. The No. 88 was then placed in the Strait of Juan de Fuca as a Recognition Ship and the No 113 was sent into Alaskan waters. The removal of these two ships left only the COLUMBIA RIVER LIGHTSHIP #93 on station at the entrance to the Columbia River with the No. 92 to be used as its relief.

The use of one lightship as standby only, seemed most uneconomical of ships and men at a time when they were at a premium. The District Coast Guard Officer, with the approval of the Commander, Northwest Sea Frontier, proposed to Headquarters that the COLUMBIA RIVER LIGHTSHIP #93 should remain on station for a month and then, on a clear day with good weather, the ship would leave her station, go to Astoria for fuel and supplies and return before dark. A station buoy would be placed close to the Lightship's position at all times and mark the station when the Lightship itself was absent. Such an arrangement would permit the RELIEF LIGHTSHIP to be used as part of the Offshore Observation Force.

Last edit over 2 years ago by Wjhoward
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The Port Orchard Buoy No. 1, located in Sinclair Inlet, in Washington, was converted for RADAR calibration by the installation of special RADAR reflectors manufactured and installed by the Navy. These reflectors were so designed as to give a flat surface no matter in what position the buoy or ship might be. In order to limit the drift of the buoy, it was moored by three sinkers, each sinker having a mooring chain attached to a swivel at the bottom of the buoy. This arrangement cut down the normal drift to not more than five yards. This particular type of mooring was developed in the District to increase the stability of buoys for special stations.

In addition to the floating calibration units, three minor light structures were equipped with RADAR reflectors at Point Herron, Washington, Duwamish Head, Washington and Desdemona Sands, Oregon. These metal reflectors were mounted in the piling of the structure and therefore, did not change in the general appearance nor lessen the structures' effectiveness as aids to navigation. The installation at Desdemona Sands consisted of a metallic screen in two panels, each panel 8' by 8', forming an inverted "V". This screen was used for accurate orientation of the Army Service Craft Detector SCR-296 which was installed on Cape Disappointment. The reflector at Duwamish Head was requested by the Navy as necessary for five control RADAR calibration of ships in that area. The reflector there consisted of two cross metallic planes mounted on the piling underneath the lights. The reflector at Duwamish Head, Washington, proved most successful where a shore type reflector had previously failed to meet desired requirements.

In April, 1945, two of the three calibration targets and lighting equipment on the Blake Island RADAR calibration buoys were lost. The buoys were replaced by Coast Guard first class regular cans, equipped with 150mm lanterns. Due to the great depth of the water in that area, it was impossible to use chain as a mooring and consequently steel wire ropes were furnished by the Navy Yard for mooring. Dragging operations were carried out by Coast Guard tenders in an effort to recover the lost equipment, but the attempt was unsuccessful.

The last special purpose buoy to be installed, was a boresighting buoy requested by the Anti-Aircraft Training Center at Pacific Beach, Washington, and located 4,000 yards off the coast from the Station. Prior to the establishment of this buoy, a Coast Guard patrol craft from Grays Harbor, Washington, Had moored off the coast while the station's guns were being boresighted. The establishment of such a buoy not only facilitated the boresighting but also released

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Last edit over 2 years ago by Wjhoward
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(Continued)RACON "A" BAND "B" BAND ANTENNA MAXIMUMSTATION MODEL COVERAGE COVERAGE ELEVATION RANGEPort Angeles YJ 61 North 95 North 25 67 "A"Wash. 60 East 101 East 102 "B"(2nd check) 16 South 17 South55 West 73 West

Seattle,Wn. YJ 30 North 49 North 505 35 "A"11 East 42 East 55 "B"28 South 40 South 33 West 46 West

Tillamook, AN/CPN-3 20 North to Southwest 25Ore. 70 South to Southwest60 Southwest to Northwest

During the initial check of the Port Angeles RACON, the YG homing beacon interfered with the signal; the second test, after the equipment had been adjusted, proved quite satisfactory considering the surrounding terrain, and showed and increase over a previous check of 35 miles on a 90 [degree] bearing from the beacon. In the northern quadrants, good coverage was obtained but it decreased slightly over Vancouver Island, B.C. and became quite poor to the south where the mountains were approximately 7500 to 8500 feet hight. The RACON antennae were located on Ediz Hook near Port Angeles, Washington, in the open with no restrictions other than the mountainous terrain.

The anternnae at the Astoria RACON were elevation 750 feet above sea level but this elevation did not provide the coverage originally hoped for. High hills to the northeast across the Columbia River and mountains to the east reduced the ranges in those directions, while a grove of trees 150 feet from the station (about 50 feet in height) restricted the signals at lower altitudes to the north, northeast and east. It was determined by the pilot that the beacon afforded good coverage over water and fair coverage over land. The Tillamook RACON was check while a forest fire was raging about 20 miles distant from the station which caused dense clouds of smoke to ascend about 8000 feet into the air. However, there was no indication that the smoke affected the beacon's signals in any way, as the mountains restricted the

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Last edit 11 months ago by caroleholmson
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hut situated on a hill at an elevation of approximately 335 ft. The only access to the station was by a foot path up a steep hill through a wooded area. All supplies and equipment were packed up and down this path. There was no emergency power line and no sanitary facilities or drinking water at the hut. It was definitely determined that that location was unsatisfactory from the standpoint of adequacy of equipment, lack of space for additional equipment or spares, lack of space for enlarging the present building and lack of accessibility. With this in mind, a survey was made of the Cape Meares Light Station, Tillamook, Oregon, with the idea of relocating the RACON equipment on Coast Guard property where adequate space was available at an elevation at approximately 325 ft. However, coverage to the eastward was restricted to high altitudes by a ridge, 150 ft. higher than the station. The coverage was comparable with that obtained at the present location. The Army had located in this particular site for security reasons and, as the war ended the necessity for such security, the more accessible position gained favor. In addition to other difficulties, when the Army RACON personnel were withdrawn, there were no facilities for messing, other than in the town of Oceanside, Oregon, (one mile distant) which Army Medical authorities had condemned as unsatisfactory from the standpoint of cleanliness. All things indicated that Cape Meares Light Station was the ideal place to move the equipment.

A similar inspection was made at the Neah Bay Army RACON Station which consisted of two YJ units and two CPN-3 Units located on top of a 1430 feet hill in a square wooden building. The station was accessible by a road constructed by the Army. The grade was steep, the road rough, but it was normally open the year around except for occasional falling of trees across the road. An attempt had at one time been made to top the nearby trees, but the Indians in the area objected. It was thought that satisfactory coverage could be given aircraft and perhaps surface craft without topping the trees, but as a flight had never been made it was not possible to make an accurate deduction. At that time, Army personnel were subsisted and quartered at a camp near the village of Neah Bay, Washington. It was necessary for personnel to be housed in the Neah Bay Indian Village, 6 miles from the RACON Station.

For reasons of inaccessibility and because good coverage was not provided for surface craft, a survey was conducted to determine whether or not adequate coverage for both air and surface craft could be given from a location on Tatoosh Island, Washington, in the vicinity of the former Navy RACON which had earlier been discontinued there. On 1 September, however, the station at Neah Bay, Washington, and at Cape Meares (Oceanside, Oregon) were transferred from

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Last edit over 2 years ago by Wjhoward

Correspondence of LH board 1901-1910

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Treasury Department

Washington

May 3, 1906.

Office of General Superintendent of Life-Saving Service

In Replying Quote these figures: L.R.92811/9

The Honorable The Secretry of Commerce and Labor

Sir:- Since the life-saving station at Yaquina Bay, Oregon, was located, changes have taken place on the beach and on the south side of the bay, near the harbor entrance, which make it desirable to relocate the station on the north side. It is understood that the old light-house reservation offers a desirable site for the station. It appears that this reservation, under date of October 24, 1888, was transferred to the War Department for temporary use. This Department has just been informed that on the 18th ultimo the War Deparment advised you that it had no present use for the reservation, and that there was no objection to the Light-House Establishment resuming possession and control thereof. I have the honor to request that, if not incompatible with the interests of the Light-House Establishment, permission be given the Life-Saving Service to occupt the reservation in question for life-saving purposes.

Last edit almost 2 years ago by Friends of Yaquina Lighthouses
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LIGHT-HOUSE ESTABLISHMENT, Office of Engineer, 13TH District, Portland, Oreg. Sept. 9, 1902. ______ Inclosures.

SUBJECT:

The Light-House Board, Washington, D.C. Sirs:- I have the honor to report that the road to Yaquina Head, Oregon, Light Station, is in need of repair by grading and ditching on the side hill where the road leaves the beach. It is estimated that $240.00 will do all work necessary to put the road in suitable condition to withstand the winter rains. The boundary fence at the station is in need of renewal, the posts being rotten and the wire rusted away. It is estimated that it will cost $250.00 to renew this fence. Owing to the isolation of the station it is respectfully recommended thath the work be done by hired labor and purchase of materials in open market existing regulations. I hereby certify that in my opinion this method is the most economical and advantageous to the Government. The work to be paid for from the appropriation Repairs and Incidental Expenses of Light-Houses 1903. Respectfully yours, W. C. ??? Captain, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A., Engineer 13th Light-House District.

Last edit over 1 year ago by jwallace
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It is the Board's intention to provide accomodations for the families of the Assistant Keepers wehre it can but where it cannot, to appoint Assistants to such stations who are without families or who do not propose to take their families with them to the station. The Board requests that you will take this statement of ??? views into consideration in your future nominations of Assistant Keepers. Respectfully, ??? Lieut. Col., Corps of Engineers, U. S. A. Engineer Secretary.

Last edit over 1 year ago by jwallace

1891 Lighthouse Keepers Logs

3

3

Journal of Light-house Station at Cape Foulweather

January 1891

24 For the day the barometer is going up Keeper returned to the station at 4. P.M.

25 Light to moderate breeze South with fog and rain showers first part of 24 hours. Last part of 24 hours thick damp fog - Sea smooth - General duties for day - keepers horse fell over the bluff north of the light today and drowned.

26 Moderate to fresh breeze south to N. West these 24 hours with rain and hail. Sea quite smooth. General duties for the day. Keeper and Mr I.L. Smith went to Newport.

27 Fresh to moderate breeze N.W. showery first part of 24 hours. last part light N.W. wind & calm with rain. Sea Quite smooth. General duties for the day. 1st asst went to Newport

28 Light to moderate wind N.W. these 24 hours cloudy but dry & fair weather and little cool. Sea quite smooth- General duties for the day Keeper working in shop. 1st Asst & Mr. Smith went up north beach.

29 Light N.W. to S.East wind to N.W. these 24 hours with fog showers during the 24 hours Sea smooth. General duties for day. Keeper went fishing today.

30 Light to moderate N.W. wind these 24 hours with rain and fog showers during the 24 hours. Sea quite smooth. General duties for the day. 1st asst went to newport today.

31 Light N.W. to S. East and South these 24 hours with rain most of 24 hours Sea quite smooth. The barometer is going down. General duties for the day.

February 1 Light to moderate breeze South to North-West these 24 hours little showery first part of 24 hours- Last part of 24 hours clearing weather and little cool. Sea quite smooth. General duties for day. Keeper took mail to Newport.

2 Light to moderate breeze East to N. West these 24 hours with clear fine and cool weather- Sea quite smooth. Keeper scrubbing out oil and office floors. Also changing the burner in Lenses.

3 Light to moderate & fresh breeze East to S. East first part of 24 hours. Last part of 24 hours light variable winds & calm fair weather during 24 hours. Sea smooth 1st asst went to Newport. 1st asst & Mr. Smith working in garden. Mr. Smith and Keeper went fishing.

4 Light wind to moderate breeze S. East to South these 24 hours. Dry first part of 24 hours Last part of 24 hours showery. Sea quite smooth. General duties for the day. Keeper Frank M. Plummer went to Newport to get some supplies. Left the station at 10 A.M.

5 Light to moderate and fresh breeze S. East to South with rain shower during the 24 hour. Sea smooth. General duties for the day. Steamer Willamett Valley sailed today. 1st asst & Mr. Smith killed a pig today. Frank M. Plummer returned to the station at 1 P.M. Mr. I L Smith went to Newport on important business. Left the station at 3 P.M.

6 Fresh and strong breeze S. to South West & West these 24 hours with rain & hail squalls during 24 hours. Sea quite rough. General duties for the day. Mr. Smith returned to the Station at 3 P.M.

7 Fresh breeze N.W. to light East wind these 24 hours with frequent rain hail & snow squalls. Sea quite smooth. General duties for the day. Keeper went to Newport after the mail.

8 Light east wind these 24 hours with clean fair but cool weather. Sea smooth. General duties for the day. Keeper went fishing today.

Last edit about 1 year ago by gkazebier
4

4

Journal of Light-house Station at Cape Foulweather Oregon

February 1891

9: Light East to S. East wind to fresh breeze South these 24 hours. First part of 24 hours damp. Last part of 24 hours rain. Sea smooth. General duties for the day.

10: Light winds varying from N.W. to S.W. first part of 24 hours with frequent rain showers. Last part of 24 hours light to moderate breeze N.W. showery. Sea smooth General duties for day. Mr. Smith went to Newport.

11: Light to moderate and fresh breeze to a gale South with rain first part of 24 hours. Last part of 24 hours fresh breeze W.NWest rain hail & snow squalls. Sea little rough. General duties for day. 1st asst went to Newport.

12: Fresh breeze W. N.W to S.W. and South with rain hail & snow squalls first part of 24 hours. Last part of 24 hours gale S. to S.W. rain hail thunder & lightening. Sea very rough. General duties for the day.

13: Fresh breeze to moderate & light wind S.West to S. East with rain, hail & snow squalls during the 24 hours. Sea very rough. General duties for the day. Steamer Willamett Valley arrived off the bar but to rough to enter. Keeper went to Newport to get some supplies, left the station at 9.30 A.M.

14: Fresh breeze West to S.East & South these 24 hours with frequent rain, hail & snow squalls. Sea quite rough. General duties for the day. Keeper returned to the station at 11 A.M. Had 3 visitors.

15: Light S.East to South wind these 24 hours with rain, hail and snow showers first part of 24 hours. Sea smooth. Steamer Willamett Valley outside yet. Last part of 24 hours fair weather. General duties for day. Keeper went fishing today. Str Willamett Valley crossed the bar at 4 P.M.

16: Light East to South wind these 24 hours, clear fine and cool weather. Sea very smooth. General duties for the day. Keepers went fishing today.

17: Light S.East wind these 24 hours, first part of 24 hours hail & snow. Last part of 24 hours fair weather. Sea very smooth. Keeper & 1st asst went fishing. General duties for the day. Mr Isaac L. Smith left the station at 11 A.M. for Newport to bring Mrs Smith home.

18: Light to moderate & fresh breze S.E. to S. and S.West & South with frequent rain showers during the 24 hours. Sea very smooth. Keepers killed a hog today. 1st went to Newport. Mr Smith returned to the station at 11.30 A.M.

19: Fresh breeze S.West to light West wind to fresh breeze W. these 24 hours with frequent rain, hail and snow squalls. Sea rough. General duties for day. Keeper wen to Newport to get supplies. Left the station at 1 P.M.

20: Fresh breeze West these 24 hours with frequent rain, hail & snow squalls. Sea rough. General duties for the day. Keeper returned to the station at 3 P.M. Mr Isaac L. Smith went to Newport after his Wife. Left the station at 4 P.M.

21: Strong breeze S.W. to light East and N.East wind these 24 hours. First part of 24 hours rain, hail and snow. Last part of 24 hours light rain. Sea quite smooth. General duties for the day. The barometer is going down quite low. Steamer Chance crossed over the Yaquina bar. Mr Smith returned to the station at 3 P.M.

22: Light N. East wind first part of 24 hours with light rain. Last part of 24 hours light variable winds and calm, light showers. Sea very smooth. General duties for day. Barometer down to 29.16.

23: Light N.W. to S.East wind first part of 24 hours. Last part of 24 hours moderate to fresh breeze S.E. to S.W. with hail & snow squalls during 24 hours. Sea smooth. General duties for day. 1st asst went to Newport.

Last edit over 1 year ago by Friends of Yaquina Lighthouses
5

5

Journal of Light-house Station at Cape Foulweather Oregon

February 1891

24 Light and moderate breeze S.E. to N.W. these 24 hours with hail snow and rain squalls - Sea smooth - General duties for day - Barometer going up fast - Keeper went to Newport after mail I hear that there is a small Sloup on North beach about 2 miles that came ashore about the 20th of month.

25 Light to moderate and fresh breeze W. to S.W. these 24 hours - little damp during 24 hours - Sea smooth - 1st asst and M. I. L. Smith putting 200 galls of Mineral oil in Oil room. Today Keeper went up north beach to see [w]reck of the sloop - Keeper went to Newport to take the mail - Left station at 2:00 am.

26 Fresh to moderate breeze S. W. to S. East these 24 hours first half of 24 hours rain last part of 24 hours fair weather - Sea very smooth - General duties for the day - Keeper went fishing today - Steamer Willamette Valley]] sailed today - Barometer going down - Keeper returned to the station at 9.30. A. M.

27 Light S. E. to East wind these 24 hours with rain first part of 24 hours - Last half of 24 hours clear fine weather - Sea quite smooth - Keeper & Mr. Smith went fishing - Mr. Smith also working in shop today.

28 Moderate and light E. & N.E to North west these 24 hours first half of 24 hours rain - Last part fair weather - Sea very smooth - General duties for the day - Keeper and M. I. L. Smith went to Newport

March

1 Light N.W. to East wind these 24 hours dry during 24 hours and fair weather - Sea smooth - General duties for the day . Keepers went fishing Today.

2 Moderate & light East to N.W. these 24 hours clear day and cold during 24 hours - Sea very smooth - General duties for day - Keepers went fishing Had three visitors - 1st asst went to Newport.

3 Light N. East to North wind and calm day and cold and clear weather during 24 hours - Sea very smooth General duties for the day - Keeper went to Newport - 1st asst and Mr. Smith went fishing

4 Light variable winds these 24 hours snow hail & rain during 24 hours - Sea very smooth - General duties for the day - Steamer Manzanita arrived off the Yaquina bar at 1 P.M and put some buoys down. And at 2:30 P.M. is laying off West of the light and then sailed north

5 Moderate and fresh breeze S. E. to East with rain and snow first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours light East to N.W. wind fair weather - Sea quite smooth - General duties for day - Keeper went fishing today.

6 Light N.W. to East calm dry & fair weather during 24 hours - Sea very smooth - General duties for the day. Mr. Smith working in garden - Keeper went to Newport on important business. Left the station at 9 A. M. Steamer Willamette Valley arrived this morning

7 Light east to N. West wind these 24 hours with clear fair but cool weather during 24 hours Sea very smooth - 1st asst and Mr. I. L. Smith working in garden - Keeper returned to the station at 3:00.

8 Light N.W. to S. East wind first part of 24 hours fair weather - Last part of 24 hours fresh breeze to a gale South rain Sea moderately smooth - General duties for day - Keeper went fishing

9 Strong to fresh and moderate breeze S. to N.W. rain first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours fair weather - Sea smooth - General duties for the day -

10 Light N.W. to East wind first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours light to moderate

Last edit over 1 year ago by gkazebier
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6

Journal of Light-house Station at Cape Foulweather Oregon

March 1891

10: and fresh breeze N.W. clear fair and cool weather sea smooth - Keeper & 1st asst went to Newport - 1st asst & Mr. Smith working in garden

11: Moderate and light N. W. to East wind these 24 hours with clear fair and cool weather during 24 hours - Sea very smooth - Keeper went to Newport - 1st asst & Mr. Smith working in garden.

12: Fresh to moderate breeze East to S. East these 24 hours. First part of 24 hours fair weather - Last part of 24 hours rain - Sea very smooth - General duties for day - Keeper went fishing

13: Moderate and wind East to S. E. and South these 24 hours - First part of 24 hours thick weather and light rain showers - Sea very smooth - General duties for the day. Steamer George Chance crossed the bar - Mr. Isaac L. Smith went to Newport for recreation. Left at 10 A.M.

14: Light S. East wind first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours light variable winds fair weather during these 24 hours - Sea smooth - Keeper planting garden - 1st asst showing visitors in tower Had 4 visitors Today - Steamer Chance sailed today - Mr. Isaac L. Smith returned to the station at 1:00 am.

15: Light humid S. to S. East with fair weather during first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours Moderate breeze South rain - Sea smooth - General duties for day - Keeper went to Newport.

16: Light S. to S. East wind with fog showers first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours light N. West wind fair weather - Sea smooth - 1st asst went fishing - Keeper & Mr. I. L. Smith planting garden.

17: Light N.W. to S. East wind fair weather first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours light to moderate & fresh breeze S. E. to S. rain - Sea smooth - Keeper & Mr. I. L. Smith planting garden. - Also went fishing today.

18: Light S. East wind and fair weather first part of 24 hours - last part of 24 hours fog showers - Sea smooth - General duties for day - Mr. Smith spading in garden - Keeper went to Newport on bussiness - Left the station at 9 A.M. - 1st asst also went to Newport.

19: Fresh to moderate breeze S.W. to West and N. West these 24 hours - Rain & fog showers most of 24 hours - Sea smooth - General duties for day - Keeper returned to the station at 1.P.M.

20: Moderate to fresh breeze South with fog and light rain showers - during 24 hours sea little rough - General duties for the day - The barometer is going down a little.

21: Fresh breeze S. to S. W. West and N. West

Last edit about 1 year ago by Jayk
7

7

Journal of Light-house Station at Cape Foulweather Oregon

March 1891

26 with frequent rain squalls - Sea little rough - General duties for day - Keeper painting desk - Mr. Smith painting chair

27 Fresh breeze to light. West wind with rain shower during the 24 hours - Sea little rough. General duties for the day - Keeper went to Newport to get some supplies. Left the station at 9:30 A.M.

28 Light N. W. wind with frequent rain & hail squalls - Sea quite smooth - General duties for the day - Keeper F. M. Plummer returned to the station at 11:30 A.M.

29 Light N.W. to S. East wind first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours light S. E. to South wind fair weather during 24 hours - Sea smooth - General duties for day - Keeper went fishing

30 Light South wind to moderate and fresh breeze N.W. first part of 24 hours light rain showers. Last part of 24 hours fair weather - Sea little rough - Keepers putting 200 galls of Mineral Oil in oil room and went fishing - Keeper making out the quarterly and monthly reports - Had one visitor

31 Fresh breeze N.W. to light East wind first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours light to moderate breeze N.W. clear fine weather during the 24 hours - Sea smoothing down - 1st asst went to Newport - Keeper and Mr. Smith went fishing - Keeper also marking out the reports

April

1 Fresh breeze East to the light S. East wind dry and fair weather first part of 24 hours. Last part of 24 hours light South to moderate breeze N.W. rain. Sea smooth - Mr. Smith went fishing today - Keeper went to Newport to take the mail - Steamers Willamette Valley & George Chance arrived today.

2 Light N.W. to N. East wind first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours moderate and fresh breeze N.W. fair weather during 24 hours - Sea very smooth - General duties for the day - Mr. Isaac L. Smith went to Newport. Keeper Mr. F. M. Plummer went to Newport after some supplies - Left the station at 9 A.M.

3 Moderate breeze N.W. to light to moderate breeze East these 24 hours with clear fine weather during 24 hours - Sea moderately smooth - General duties for day - Keeper returned to the station at 1. P. M.

4 Light to moderate & fresh breeze S.E. to S. and N.W. these 24 hours first part of 24 hours fair weather Last part of 24 hours rain - Sea quite smooth. The barometer is going up. General duties for the day.

5 Light N.W. to S.E. wind to fresh breeze and gals during 24 hours, first part of 24 hours with fog showers - Last part of 24 hours cloudy but dry - Sea moderately smooth- General duties for day - Barometer going down.

6 Gale to fresh and moderate breeze South to S. West these 24 hours with hard rain most of 24 hours - Sea rough - General duties for the day - The barometer is going up a little

7 Light S. East wind to moderate and fresh breeze South with frequent rain showers during the 24 hours - Sea very rough - General duties for the day - 1st asst went to Newport .

8 Light West to S. East wind damp during 24 hours - Sea quite rough - General duties for the day - Keeper F. M. Plummer went to Newport on important business - Left the station at 8 A.M.

9 Light to moderate breeze S to S. East with hard rain during 24 hours - Sea quite rough. General duties for the day - The barometer is going up. Keeper returned to the station at 5:00 P.M.

10 Light to S. E. wind to moderate breeze south these 24 hours first part of 24 hours light rain showers - Last

Last edit over 1 year ago by gkazebier
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8

Journal of Light-house Station at Cape Foulweather Oregon

April 1891

10 part of 24 hours clearing weather - Sea rough. General duties for the day - 1st asst went to Newport after mail.

11 Light N.W. to S.E. wind & calm dry first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours light variable winds fair weather - Sea quite smooth. General duties for the day - Keeper and Mr. Smith went trout fishing up North beach.

12 Light variable winds and calm these 24 hours first part of 24 hours damp - Last part of 24 hours light rain showers - Sea quite smooth - General duties for the day - The barometer is going down slowly - Light House Tender Manzanita arrived sometime during the morning and crossed the bar at 2:30 P.M.

13 Light E. to S. E. wind and little damp first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours light variable winds cloudy but dry weather - Sea little rough - General duties for day - Keeper & Mr. Smith went fishing - 1st asst went to Newport.

14 Light N.W. wind and calm these 24 hours fair weather during 24 hours - Sea quite smooth. General duties for the day - Mr. Isaac L. Smith and 1st asst went fishing today - Keeper Mr. Frank M. Plummer went to Newport after supplies - Left the station at 8:30 A.M.

15 Light East wind to moderate breeze South these 24 hours with fair weather - Sea smooth. General duties for the day - Keeper returned to the station at 1.P.M.

16 Moderate breeze south to light variable wind & calm first part of 24 hours with rain - Last part of 24 hours Moderate breeze N.W. cloudy but dry - Sea smooth - General duties for the day - Keepers went fishing today - L.H. Tender Manzanita crossed Yaquina bar bound for Astoria this morning.

17 Fresh breeze N. West with frequent fog showers during these 24 hours - Sea little rough - 1st asst went to Newport and working in garden - Keeper making out requisition for the annual supplies for station the next year.

18 Fresh to moderate breeze N.W. these 24 hours first part of 24 hours damp fog - Last part of 24 hours heigh dry fog - Sea smooth - General duties for the day - Keepers cleaning out chicken house and making out requisition for supplies.

19 Light to moderate breeze N.W. to S.E. and South these 24 hours first part of 24 hours cloudy but dry - Last part of 24 hours rain - Sea smooth - General duties for the day - Keeper & Mr. Smith went trout fishing - Had three visitors today.

20 Light S.E. to variable winds these 24 hours first part of 24 hours cloudy but dry - Last part of 24 hours fair weather - Sea quite smooth - General duties for day - Keeper went to Newport.

21 Light variable winds cloudy but dry first part of 24 hours Last part of 24 hours moderate and fresh breeze to a gale S.E. to South cloudy and little damp. Sea smooth - General duties for the day - Steamer Chance sailed today - Mr. Smith went to Newport on important business left station at 8 A.M.

22 Gale to strong & fresh breeze south with hard rain during 24 hours. Sea little rough. General duties for the day. The barometer going up a little. Mr. Smith returned to the station at 4 P.M.

23 Moderate breeze S. to S. East and S. West these 24 hours with some showery weather. General duties for the day. Sea very rough. Steamer Willamette Valley arrived but to rough to cross bar.

24 Light wind to moderate & fresh breeze S. to S. East and S. West with rain and hail squalls during 24 hours. Sea rough. General duties for the day. The bar to rough for steamer to cross Today. Mr. I. L. Smith went to Newport to get some supplies. Left the station at 8 A.M.

Last edit about 1 year ago by Jayk
9

9

Journal of Light-house Station at Cape Foulweather Oregon

April 1891

25 Light S.E. and East wind to South. Fresh breeze and gale these 24 hours with rain during 24 hours - Sea quite smooth - General duties for the day - Steamer Willamette Valley crossed bar today - Keeper went up north beach - 1st asst went to Newport - Mr. Smith arrived at the cape at 11:30 AM

26 Strong breeze S. to light S.East wind and damp first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours moderate & fresh breeze to a gale south with rain - Sea quite rough - General duties for the day - Keeper went to Newport after some supplies - Left the station at 8 A.M.

27 Strong breeze to light South wind with hard rain during the 24 hours - Sea very rough. General duties for the day - Keeper returned to the station at 5:00 P.M.

28 Light to moderate breeze S.E. to S. and S. West these 24 hours first part of 24 hours little damp. Last part of 24 hours fair weather - Sea moderately smooth - General duties for day - 1st asst went to Newport

29 Light S. East wind first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours light to moderate breeze N.W. little cloudy first part of 24 hours - fair weather last part Sea smooth - Keeper went fishing and working in the garden - 1st asst & Mr. Smith also working in garden. - Str Willamette Valley sailed today.

30 Moderate and light N.W. wind these 24 hours clear fine weather - Sea very smooth. General duties for the day - Keeper and Mr. Smith went trout fishing today.

May

1 Moderate and light N.W. winds first part of 24 hours with clear fair weather. Last part of 24 hours moderate and fresh breeze N.W. little foggy - Sea very smooth - General duties for the day - Keeper went to Newport.

2 Fresh and moderate breeze to light N.W. wind and thick damp fog first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours light N.W. to South wind fair weather and heigh dry fog - General duties for day - Sea smooth - 1st asst went to Newport.

3 Fresh and moderate breeze South damp first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours fresh breeze South. Damp. Sea smooth - General duties for the day - Keeper and Mr. Isaac L. Smith went 10 miles up the coast.

4 Fresh breeze to moderate wind during these 24 hours with hard rain most of the time - Sea smooth. General duties for the day. Keeper and Mr. I.L. Smith returned to the station at 11:30 A.M.

5 Light S.E. wind and rain first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours light variable winds damp - Sea smooth - General duties for the day. Had three visitors today - 1st asst went to Newport. Steamer arrived today.

6 Light to moderate breeze S.W. to South rain first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours light South to N.W. wind showery - Sea smooth - General duties for the day - Keeper and Mr. Smith sawing wood on the beach.

7 Moderate breeze N.W. these 24 hours little damp but mostly fair weather - Steamer Willamette Valley sailed today - Sea smooth - Two visitors today - Keeper & Mr. Smith sawing wood on beach - Keepers painting on picket fence today.

8 Moderate breeze to light wind and fresh breeze N.W. these 24 hours clear fair weather - Sea smooth. Keeper went to Newport on business - 1st asst and Mr. I.L. Smith painting the picket fence.

9 Fresh breeze to light and fresh breeze - There 24 hours clear fine weather during 24 hours - Sea smooth. Keepers painting on picket fence and completed it today - The barometer is going down a little.

Last edit over 1 year ago by gkazebier
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10

Journal of Light-house Station at Cape Foulweather Oregon

May1891

10 Light to moderate and fresh breeze N.W. these 24 hours. Thick fog most of 24 hours - Sea very smooth - Keeper and Mr. I.L. Smith went clamming. General duties for the day - 1st asst went to Newport.

11 Moderate and light N.W. wind with frequent light fog showers during 24 hours. Sea very smooth - General duties for the day - Keeper & the 1st asst went fishing - Keeper & Mr. Smith cutting wood on the beach.

12 Light N.W. wind & calm with fog showers first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours light to moderate breeze N.W. fair weather - Sea very smooth. Keeper went fishing. Mr. Smith painting in his quarters. 1st asst keeper working in the garden He also went to Newport.

13 Moderate and light to fresh breeze N.W. these 24 hours first part of 24 hours little damp - Last part of 24 hours fair weather - Sea smooth - Steamer J. Chance crossed bar today - Keepers painting the barn and store house.

14 Moderate and light to fresh breeze N.W. these 24 hours clear fine last part of 24 hours - First part cloudy - Sea smooth - Keepers painting in Keepers dwelling today. Half and hour late in lightning and something got into the supply tube had to take it apart and put it together again.

15 Light N.W. winds to variable wind and calm these 24 hours cloudy but dry and warm weather - Sea very smooth - Steamer Willamette Valley arrived this morning - Keepers painting on the dwelling today.

16 Light variable winds and calm with heigh dry fog first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours light to moderate breeze N.W. clear fine weather - Sea smooth - Keepers painting on the Dwelling and 1st asst Quarters - Also cleaning out the lamp in ???

17 Moderate to fresh breeze N.W. these 24 hours with clear fine and warm weather. Sea smooth - General duties for the day - Had 8 visitors - Keeper went to Newport today.

18 Moderate breeze N.W. these 24 hours with clear fine weather during 24 hours - Sea very smooth. Steamer Willamette Valley and Mischeif sailed yesterday - Keepers whitewashing fences today.

19 Moderate breeze to light N.W. wind with fog showers during first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours light to moderate and fresh breeze N.W. clear fine weather - Sea smooth - Keepers whitewashing fences and oil-house also painting the south end of oil house - 1st asst went to Newport.

20 Moderate to fresh and strong breeze N.W. these 24 hours with fair weather during 24 hours - Sea smooth. Keepers cleaning in the lantern getting ready to paint and mixing paint - 1st asst also working in garden. Keepers also polishing the reflectors and illuminating apparatus and oil carriers and cocks to oil butts.

21 Fresh breeze to light N.W. wind first part of 24 hours. Last part of 24 hours light to moderate and strong breeze N.W. clear fine weather - Sea smooth - Keepers painting the lantern inside with white paint today.

22 Fresh and moderate breeze N.W. these 24 hours with heigh dry fog during 24 hours - Sea smooth. Keeper went fishing - Mr. Smith getting wood off beach - 1st asst went to Newport - Keepers painting pane of Lennes and cleaning it also painting the pedestal green.

23 Moderate and light N.W. wind these 24 hours first part of 24 hours damp fog - Last part of 24 hours fair weather - Sea smooth - Mr. I.L. Smith went to Newport after some supplies 1st asst painting the water tank - Keeper went to Newport after some supplies - Left the station at 8:30 A.M.

Last edit over 1 year ago by gkazebier
11

11

Journal of Light-house Station at Cape Foulweather Oregon

May 1891

24 Light N.West wind these 24 hours with damp fog - Sea very smooth - General duties for the day - Keeper returned to the station at 11 A.M.

25 Light variable winds and calm these 24 hours first part of 24 hours thick damp fog - Last part of 24 hours heigh dry fog - Sea very smooth. Keepers painting dome railings & parapet - Also whitewashing inside of tower.

26 Light S. to S.E. wind & calm first part of 24 hours with light rain showers - Last part of 24 hours light variable winds fair weather - Sea very smooth - Keeper and Mr. I.L. Smith went after razor clams. Keepers painting lantern floor stairs and watchroom floor black also getting stage ready to paint Bracketts - 1st asst went to Newport. Steamer Willamette Valley sailed today.

27 Light variable winds cloudy but dry these 24 hours - Sea very smooth - The barometer is going down a little - Keepers painting the bracketts and getting stage ready and mixing paint to paint tower.

28 Light S. to S.W. and West first part of 24 hours. Last part of 24 hours light variable winds with some fog showers mostly first part of 24 hours - Sea smooth - Keepers painting the main part of tower white and putting away staging.

29 Moderate and light S. to S.E. and S.W. winds these 24 hours with frequent rain showers most of the 24 hours - Sea smooth - Keeper went to Newport - 1st asst & Mr. Smith painting tower winds and base of tower.

30 Light South wind and calm damp during first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours light to moderate and fresh breeze N.W. fair weather - Sea smooth - General duties for the day - Keeper and Mr. Isaac L. Smith went fishing - 1st asst went to Newport to attend decoration day.

31 Moderate breeze N.W. these 24 hours cloudy but dry during 24 hours - Sea very smooth. General duties for the day - Keepers went fishing today.

June

1 Light N.W. wind & calm these 24 hours first part of 24 hours cloudy but dry - Last part of 24 hours fair weather - Sea smooth - Keeper went to Newport after supplies. Left station at 8 A.M. - 1st asst & Mr. Smith working on the road today.

2 Light to moderate and fresh breeze N.W. clear fine weather during 24 hours - Sea very smooth. Keeper returned to the station at 8 A.M. Steamer Willamette Valley arrived off the bar at 1 P.M. Keepers painting iron railings and floor black - 1st asst and Mr. I.L. Smith working on the road today.

3 Moderate breeze to light N.W. and North wind these 24 hours clear fine and warm weather - Sea smooth - Had seven visitors today - 1st asst cleaning and painting in his quarters. Keepers also painting window sash in tower and oil room also chimneys of oil house and steps of dwelling and cellar doors.

4 Light N.W. to S.E. wind to fresh breeze South these 24 hours - First part of 24 hours cloudy but dry - Last part of 24 hours hard rain - Sea smooth - 1st asst cutting the grass inside of the yard - Keeper & Mr. Smith went to Newport - Steamer Willamette Valley sailed today.

5 Light South wind these 24 hours with little damp and cloudy - Sea smooth - 1st asst painting in his quarters and working in garden & cutting grass - Mr. Smith also working in the garden today.

6 Light S. to S.W. and West wind these 24 hours first part of 24 hours rain showers - Last part of 24 hours cloudy and little damp - Sea very little rough - 1st asst went to Newport. 1st asst also painting in his quarters and cleaning weeds from the brick walk around dwelling - Keeper writing out the reports.

Last edit over 1 year ago by gkazebier
12

12

Journal of Light-house Station at Cape Foulweather Oregon

June 1891

7 Light variable winds these 24 hours first part of 24 hours showery - Last part of 24 hours clear fine weather - Sea quite smooth. General duties for the day - Had two visitors today.

8 Light variable winds with rain shower first part of 24 hours. Last part of 24 hours light to moderate breeze N.W. fair weather - Sea smooth - Keeper & 1st asst cleaning weeds from walk & 1st asst painting his floor in his quarters - Keeper also painting back steps of dwelling and went clamming - Mr. Smith painting back steps and went clamming this morning.

9 Moderate breeze to light N.W. wind first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours light to moderate breeze N.W. clear fine weather - Sea smooth - General duties for the day - Keeper went to Newport - Had two visitors today.

10 Light variable winds & calm these 24 hours with light rain most of the time - Sea smooth - General duties for the day - 1st asst & Mr. Smith went fishing - Keeper went to Newport on important business - Left the station at 8 A.M.

11 Light variable winds and calm with light rain showers during most of 24 hours - Sea very smooth. General duties for the day - Keeper F.M. Plummer returned to the station at 11:30 A.M.

12 Light N.W. wind with light rain showers first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours cloudy and fair weather - Sea very smooth - General duties for day - Keepers went fishing - Had two visitors - 1st asst went to Newport.

13 Light variable winds with frequent fog showers first part of 24 hours. Last part of 24 hours fair weather - Sea very smooth - General duties today - Had 5 visitors - Keeper went to Newport on business.

14 Light N.W. wind and calm first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours light variable winds & calm fair weather during 24 hours - Sea smooth - Keepers went fishing and putting hay in the barn - Had three visitors today.

15 Light variable winds dry first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours light to moderate breeze S.E. to S. West and South - rain - Sea smooth - Keepers putting 200 gall of mineral oil in oil house - 1st asst weeding in garden

16 Light S.E. wind with light rain showers first part of 24 hours - Last part of 24 hours light variable winds & calm fair warm weather-srea smooth-General duties for day

17 Light to moderate and fresh breeze these 24 hours-first part of 24 hours rain showers-Last part of 24 hours cloudy and little damp-Sea little rough-General duties for day

18 Moderate to fresh breeze these 24 hours with frequent rain squalls-Sea quite rough-The baromiter is going down a little-General duties for day

19 Moderate breeze to light S.E. wind first part of 24 hours- Last part of 24 hours light gale to moderate breeze South with rain most of 24 hours-Sea quite rough-General duties for day-Keeper F.M. Plummer went to Newport on import business- Left the station at 9 A.M.

20 Moderate breeze South these 24 hours with rain showers most of the time-Sea quite rough-Steamer Willimgton arrived into Yaquina Bat at 9 A.M. for wood having got out of coal before geting to Coos Bay-General duties for day- Keeper returned to thevstation at 6 P.M.

21 Moderate to fresh breeze S. to S. West these 24 hours-First part of 24 hours hard rain- Last part of 24 hours rain showers-General duties for day-1st asst went to Newport

22 Light S.W. to S.E. wind these 24 hours with hard rain & hail showers--Sea quite rough

Last edit about 1 year ago by gkazebier
Records 31 – 60 of 278