Howitt and Fison Papers

OverviewStatisticsSubjects

Search for mūrūp* Mūrŭp* mūrŭp* Murup* murup* Mūrup* Mūrūp*

XM461_ICDMS_lowres

10

10

6A (9)As connected with magic, or rather with the supernatural, [the - crossed out][following song may serve- crossed out] Kurburu song serves as an example. It brings into view acurious belief in some supernatural connection [supernaturally - crossed out] between beastsand man which is found in so many Australian [beliefs] legends and tales.

It was composed and sung by a bard named Kurburu who livedmany years ago in the early days of the settlement of the countyby the whites, near where the town of Berwick now stands [in the - crossed out][Western Port District - crossed out]. He was supposed to have killed a "nativebear" [(Note) Phascolarctos cinereus- crossed out] and being possessedby its spirit (murup) henceforth chaunted its song.

Kurburu's Song

Enaguroa nung ngalourma

There now cut-a-cross

barein gurukba murnein

track blood ?

burunbai nganungba

hurt myself

lilira muringa

[chipped tomahawk(with). (Note_ - crossed out] I was notable to obtain a satisfactory verbatim translation of this song.

The singer, Berak, gave me the following free translation, "Youacross my track, you spilled my blood, and broke your toma-hawk on me.The time with two short sticks, while an appreciative ring audience stood round

Umbara's Song

Galagala binja buninga ngali

Capsizing me striking me

winbelow jena ngarauan udja

(the) wind blows hard (the) sea long stretched

kandubai buninga melinthi buninga

between striking hard hitting striking

ngali mulari binja buninga

me dashing up me striking

Last edit about 2 months ago by ALourie

XM593_ICDMS_lowres

5

5

These beliefs in the customs of the human [crossed out - most of line] at the death I have from them very [in?ful?], [?] by unusual, any the [central?] native tribes. The [Murup Yanth?] - a [?] - - - is whether he is

Last edit 6 months ago by Christine

XM759_ICDMS_lowres

16

16

My name isBairŭk - grub in gum treeOther father of my fathername me this name froma son of his when I wasa baby.

When my father died[when I was?] [Everyone toldme you should go toyour grand father Bairŭk.He was waa like me.- I was made a Tallungŭn when I was a big boy.

At the [?] [?] oldpeople say [to?] many [Kūn?]of you eats porcupine[Kaw?] [wŭrn?] [/?] thenlightning called give [at?]any time. -------------------------------------------

You [Duck?] eat Emu now but only[2 words crossed out] by andbye when you are married - if you go lookingfor possums or [mintly? or mainly? or monkey?],you will fall down only tree

[sidways writing] the mūrŭp of possum or [?ky?]they will make them fall--

When he is rubbed overwith emu fat [then?] hecamp [?]then hecan eat it. ---

When he is married and get children [Arrow going from here to after "down only tree"][Duck?] eating is punished by [lightning crossed out][ngūrn-da-bil?](growling)[wūl-lū-djin?](shining-bright)

Last edit 3 months ago by ALourie
17

17

Every animal has a spirit That of possum = mūrŭp. It is just like a possum- Doctors can see him - _____________________When the mūrŭp catches the [nanj kūm?] - he shows it to the Doctor -some [Erjurrim? gait?] are Doctors not all) - I am not. Doctor comes up by about 4 o'clock pm and [nanjKūm?] stand there - Doctor looks at him and says "you have a possum there - you here better [too?] quick [to?] [eat? or catch?] the possum. Doctor rubs down his

[next page ]

leg and pull out a young possum.

Waa has a mūrŭp it is very good it doesnot touch any thing or hurt it. If a [waa? or man?] comes [cries?] you and cries out wa-wa-wa then you know that enemies are coming. Then you say Kūlindat [melen?]?Blacks here!

Then he says more wa-wa-wa. then we [run?]Then he flies away saying wa-wa-wa - and we run after him to escape.

Last edit over 1 year ago by Christine
19

19

Gippsland blacks legend

May-met } Tarwin Ber-bira }

[Beyond? or legend?] sections are theWarri-je-[lek?]long way off country

Echuch?]May met

yarŭk or yarūk = messenge stickas a present.Njŭrrŭgait - makes them.

mangūrt = [ball?]

[next page]

mūrūp - gives the [s?mp?]to Doctors.Kŭr būrū - told Kūlin atBunyip he find that Berbira coming and to keep a look out then.

This man was Bunjil - Kŭr būrū[no?] Mūrŭp of this [Kurbŭru?] [held? or had?] him This was the mans personal name.

This bear had been killed and his Mūrŭp had gone into the blackfellow. Then the Mūrŭp would find him a [fūngūrū?]

Last edit over 1 year ago by Christine
21

21

Only the doctors can see Mūrŭp. -

Where Kellys father had a station a Waang man has a son - and he got a girl for Wangaratta who was like his daughter - his son took her for a wife. The old man said -"why have you done this thing-I am ashamed - every one hears of it - I have done with you-" He then speared him in the thigh and by and bye he died.

I was a boy without [brothers?]

[next page]

old man nothing. girl father - man spear - Banjam___________________________If a man killed with Mūng a doctor - is called in to the sick man - he watches of [where?] [?] a mūng he can see him in the middle of the night [2 words crossed out] the coming first out the ground and then come up in the camp and gets [with? or into?] people.

Doctor sees the back of the mūng in the man. Doctor calls the mūng. He then break a bit off so that it cannot escape.

Last edit about 2 months ago by Jacqui Durrant
22

22

and puts it in his bag.

Then old man dies the Doctor sends Mūng to tell the man who did it Dr get present of tomahawk spear, [supose?].

If no doctor the people dig grave and put the body in [part?] and sweep out grave. and find a little hole. The male relatives follow the direction and [kill?] first man they meet.-

[next page]

cover up body in grave: The old men say now when you have killed a man - and plant him - but put him out - in a log so that people can see him.

Then the killed mans friends find him. ----------

Dead body head up then[drawing of body] in possum rug with[in squatting position] possum fine cord.

Her necklace and tomahawk - kill husbandSoon, by [?] of a [?] not give him any [surprise?] or he might be the Mūrŭphad some one.

Last edit over 1 year ago by Christine
29

29

[diagonal line through text]stick[?] for[Sūnan?] is called [Kalk?].--------------(means start for the Bora) -

Spear / (gōyŭn) all of [noro?]- jagged. belongs to the fighting._________________________-------------------------------------------QuestionsDid they kill & eat children-------------------------------------------Did they [burn?] [wa?]----------------------------------------Will he make Kalk for wang Kūm-----------------------------------------------------Can Wirra-rap see ngarang?------------------------------------------------Does ngarang hunt men-----------------------------------------------Is ngarang like Mūrŭp----------------------------------------------

[next page]

What is Kau-wurn thatwould catch wang Kūmif eating porcupine. ---------------------------------------------Does Mūrup eatanything ---------------------------------------------------------goy ūn [on diagonal][Can?] Mūrūp hurtany body------------------------------------Tell me what [?] [?]seeing Mūrŭp.

Can wirra-rap dreamabout people

Name of bag which is carried roundhis neck.

Is [word?] for [?][?]

Last edit 3 months ago by ALourie
30

30

ya-yūt-gin = dreamye-mūn = sleep

mūrŭp can come when I am asleep. -------------___________________________nga-ma-jit = whitefellow_____________________________[ye-mŭnŭra?] = snoring_____________________________When I sleep andsnore my Mūrŭpgives any to [tharau galk?] [/ek?]---------------------------the other in the clouds. -----------Mūrŭp can see [tharaugalk?] but cannot[?] [?] it and come back.

[next page]

[When?] I am asleep my Mūrŭp can call to another Mūrŭp[say?] of my father.________________________[?] came for? Manaroo[?] of Ovens and Mansfield all the world [was?] little tin houses - and propped up by Kalk. News says that props rotten and it would tumble down.- did not hear of him hunting big [?] The oldpeople said that the cloud now held up by props and if they [?] and the [tharaugalk?] [would?]

Last edit 6 months ago by Jacqui Durrant
33

33

[marūn? or marūk?] = bayI put in possum & Kangaroo -made of Kangaroo skin ___________________________I think that a [mūrup? or mūnj?][belonging?] [manarap?] [came?] sent outfor a Kūlin, When Wirrarup sleeps I think he can send his mūrŭp outto see mūrŭp belonging to Kūlin. --------__________________________ghost in grave?_____________________________[?-bench?] ngŭrŭng = hair head with big?] [beard

[next page]

arms all hairy and hanging. ------Plenty of ngŭrŭng everywhere. I was under nearby hill where earth[ welled?]up. Comes out in evening. This fellow has [mūnj?]. Youcannottell him only the wirra rap see him.

He makes you a mūnj in your [Kai?] [another?] you cannot walk.

This mūnj is like bone of Kangaroo or Emu in little [?] ______________________

Last edit 3 months ago by ALourie
34

34

mūrŭp can get food any where.- Kūlin Mūrŭp has things like little spears that are mūnj - they can get any food they like - kangaroo, [swan?] possum. And whitefellows ['have' crossed out]mūnj have cart and bullock [drum?] They can get food too - apple & bread any where they like because no one can see themand when I was asleep I dreamed

[next page]

I was in a gully in the ranges - the [piece?] of [ground?] I sat on slid down the gully with me. Then I got up and saw a big man before me [then?]

I said Hello! I looked at it - and there was [gold?] [dressing?] all over it. I dreamed this three times.

My Mūrŭp had gone into the mountains I never saw the [place?]before. - I was dreaming

I went for [?] [?]__________________________I am [guessing?] but every time I look for him[?] - it must be a little bit farther out

Last edit over 1 year ago by Christine
35

35

the old man told me [that?] if you roast a possum leave it there the Mūrŭp will come behind you to warm himself and will eat the possum. ______When a blackfellow[?] [?] a possum and eats some and leaves the rest the Mūrŭp comes and eats. ----------

Kam-bŭrr = grave

Sometimes Mūrŭp comes back to the grave and looks

[next page]

at it and saysthat is my possum rug that is my body. ____________________________Once [rest of line crossed out)][?] [?] The people of Goulburn -[?] River, Broken River Kilmore - Camped there [next 3 lines crossed out]

There was a well built by [?] and about [Gin?] came up to campof possum and soon An old woman[who?] had [not?] any children [saw?] him

Last edit over 1 year ago by Christine
37

37

look at this manchild.Here is the mark where Bunjil [?ate?] aim in the neck. [Opposite?] [it?] a little way off wasthe place where Thadagŭn? or Jhadagŭn?.

[Thadagŭn? or Jhadagŭn?] is just like a black woman. [Hurry?] [round?] with all kinds of snakeslizards and guanas.

Bunjil told the Porcupine to smash

[next page]

the stone for he wanted his children back.

Thadagŭn or Jhadagŭn? was [hed?] and only its Mūrŭp remained. It has Mūng. But it is not much bad because it is smashed.---------

[Once?] blackfellas [were?] hunting pheasants near the plains,they heard Thadagŭn?or Jhadagŭn? coming up - it came out [from?] [light?] - [pure?] white. They were veryfrighten and could not speak. It named

Last edit over 1 year ago by Christine
39

39

point in the direction[hand?] - point to the [face? or nose?] or breath hard.

Heat of fire ['Heat of fire' underlined] - breath hard

[very?] [glad?] - pat the breastswith both hands

Hello! Tap in a [?] [?]

[?] [look?] [down?][sideways?] [Where? or when?] Water? [underlined sign for [Where? or when?] - [water?] lookArm to left side.

There a long [way?] [off?]!

[next page]

[wave?] hand and point at 45 O [45 degrees]"There - near" point at 45 O [45 degrees] & [horizon?] [when? or when?] --------------------------------------------------------A black fellow from the other side of Portland - between that and the Glenelg told methat his people when the buried a poor fellow put a [bush? or hut?] round the grave and put inbilly of tea and some bread there and that the Mūrŭp came and drank and ate it.

Last edit over 1 year ago by Christine
43

43

[slowly?]all night = [Me?] [dim?] & [inclined?]fist held a little in front of bodyand [motions?] head [equally?] -------sit down. sits downand look [fixidly?] at man[next line crossed out]

Go away. back of handapproach - [wave?] [away?] fingers

Friend

Enemy

________________________________Where did they get fire from______________________________Does Bunjil live alone___________________________

[next page]

Female Mūrŭp?___________________________Who made the old [Cans?]___________________________Deluge stones_____________________________Head - Kau-angHair - Yarri-KauangEye - [myrng - ata?]nose - Kangataor [ngambi-Kang?][temple?] - [ngambirding?]ngayibi = holeear -[ girerrung?][Blood?] - [gorūk?]Bone - [ngr n crossed out] [un-njeun?]hand - [nuj mory?]Thumb - [bapanye my muyng?]Foot - ajennaSun - ngau-nanmoon - [myrne-an?]

[In left margin][wirngnata?] - lobe of ear

Last edit over 1 year ago by Christine

XM765_ICDMS_lowres

16

16

William and Dick saidthat their people thoughtthat whitemen were murupcomeback.Major said that [??] likethe looleen of his people

Gardner Ck at River Koyūng-bort

Last edit 3 months ago by ALourie

hw0404 Notes on Kurnai 150 pages

18

18

ask Murray JackWorld Props. The earth[ditto] sky[ditto] beyond

Ghosts - (1) Is it "dullabin". English meaning of dullabon?(2) Where goes after death; along road to meet Daramulun?haunt bush? eat food? warm at fires?

(3) Is there a [?mūrŭp?] which present in sleep?(4) What are dreams.(5) Suppose a boy could see ghosts would he becomea wizard?

Burial how was grave made + corpse buried - was itin costume and had it weapons.Daramulun - can they talk to women about him.

Wizards How did a man become a wizard?How did he go up aloft?Totems Can Kangaroos, Ebai, Bats, Tchuteba, +cgive warning of danger?

Sky What is is? - What is it called - (see first question)

Last edit 3 months ago by ALourie

hw0421 Notes by Howitt on the Wotjobaluk

34

34

29Burials

I burials the following positions are given to the deceased man:

Krokitch: Wartwŭt - head to N20W - towards hot windGartchuka A [ditto] [ditto] NW[ditto] B [ditto] [ditto] N 65 WNgaui [?ngulli?] (a) [ditto ditto] - E towards the sunrise(b) - [?SE?] 20 [E - crossed out]

Ganŭtch Durrimuruk (a) - N10WDurrimuruk (b) - NJallan - S20 EBatjangŭl - S40W

The body is [extended at length on his back - crossed out] laid on his back with the ?arms crossed over the breast.

No Wotjo was ever believed to have died from what we shouldcall natural causes but to have been done to deathby the machinations of some enemy. When a mandies he is [rol- crossed out] corded up tight with his knees drawnup to his chest and his [hands - crossed out] arms crossed [on his breast - crossed out]under these on his naked breast is placed histhrowing stick (gárik). He is then rolled up in his'possum rug. An oblong or oval grave is dug aboutfour feet in depth. A sheet of bark is placed onthe bottom - on this leaves and on this strands of possum [sk- crossed out] pelts carefully pulled asunder so as tomake a soft bed for the "poor fellow". Anotherlot of leaves and pelt is placed, over it barkand then the earth is returned and rammedtight. Logs are placed over the grave to preventdogs interfering with it. A fire is lit at the gravefor the gŭlkan gŭlkan to warm itself atand the friends then return to the camp.

On the following day they return and carefullyclear an oval space some thirty paces inits longer diameter. The loose soil is thenraised in mounds (like [?plate?] circles) thus[sketch] The relatives then go away for 3 or 4 months returning at that time to clean up the grave and ground,and see that it is all right.

[written in left side margin]

These bearings wereobtained from a seriesof supposition burialsmade by Bobby witha piece of wood for the body.The Bearings were thentaken by compass.

also called mūrŭp

Last edit 6 months ago by ALourie

hw0391 Notes by Howitt on Kulin from Barak

14

14

9To eat these forbidden animals subjects the offender not only to punishment at the hands of the old men but also is supposed to bring upon him supernatural vengeance. William was told by the old people at the Goulburn River that if a “tallanggŭn” eat some of a porcupine the [?Kaiu?] wŭrn ([lightning or - crossed out] thunder) would kill him sometime. A Tallangŭn who eat the forbidden female possum [was - crossed out] would it was supposed fall from a tree sometime when climbing. It was the same with the native bear. In all these cases it was supposed that it was the Mūrŭp (ghost = spirit) of the animal that revenged it. Eating Black Duck was said to be punished by thunder or lightning. (wūrn – da – bil = growling) – wūl – lū – djin = shining – bright) —————

The illustration that William gave me was as follows:“If the Wang Kūrn (tallanggŭn) eat an old woman possum then the Mūrŭp of the possum would catch him. He feels bad and shows himself to the Doctor (Wirarap) (Some Ngŭrŭng gaeta are Doctors – not all– I am not). The Doctor comes up to see him, say about 4 o’clock in the afternoon and the Wang Kūrnstands before him. The Doctor looks at him and says “You have a 'possum there – you have taken too [eating - crossed out] quick to eat the possum”. The Doctor then rubs down his thigh and pulls out a young possum”. ——————

[written in the left side margin]note the joeaof the Yūin

Last edit 3 months ago by ALourie
18

18

11William said he thought that the Wirarap could send his mūrŭp (spirit) out in sleep to injure people or to talk to the spirits [that - crossed out] of [Kulin - crossed out] sleeping Kūlin that are roaming about.

Besides these ways of injuring people which were peculiar to the Wizard it was believed that any one could injure people. For instance it was believed that a person could be killed taking a Mŭrawŭn (throwing stick) tieing on to it a piece of the intended victim’s hair, with some fat, preferably of Emu. This was then set up in front of a fire as it wasroasted and the stick destroyed the victim became ill and died. This was called Kalbŭne – Mŭriwŭn or “broken throwing stick” —

The Kūlin at Geelong (Wŭdthówrŭng) were believed to carry in their bags (nŭtba) the seed vessels of the She oak for the purpose of blinding people. William explained it thus “These people used to put them in the fire so that when you went near it the smoke of the thūr-rang (she oak) would get into your eyes and you became blind”.

The May met at Echucha [sic[ are said by William to have invented a fearful “mūng”. They mixed up with tobacco some of a dried up rotten body – [it was - crossed out] this was called Thandal. Then they put [in - crossed out] itin a bag and if any one smoked it "it got into his stomach and he swelled like a woman with child.No Doctor can cure him. They do this now”. ——

Another much dreaded means of compassing the death of a person was by the Bŭr-[r - crossed out]ŭng which was made of the sinew of Kangaroo tail (Bŭrtjin) and the small bone of a Kangaroo leg (Ng-yellŭng).The sinew cord had a loop at the end and the pointed bone at the other. It was supposed that

[written in left side margin]note practice of Kŭrnai

Last edit 3 months ago by ALourie
19

19

12a person armed with two of these would sneak up to the camp of his enemy during his first sleep.If the victim snored while he slept that was the time. The assailant [crept up - crossed out] would creep up and place his hand carefully on the brow of the [victi - crossed out]sleeper. [It w - crossed out] If it was cool he would not wake – if it was warm the man waited a while. The time being propitious for the operation the cord was lightly passed round the [vi - crossed out] sleeper's neck and the bone being threaded [wa - crossed out] through the loop [the - crossed out] was pulled tight, another Bŭrŭng was then passed [through t - crossed out] round the feet and the victim carried off into the bush where he was cut open and his kidney fat extracted. It was believed that if the kidney fat was heated over the fire he would die in two days – but if only carried away he would linger three or more days. The victim coming to himself thought he had been only asleep and dreaming. [In the morning perhaps some clever fellows would see him looking strange and would say “You don’t look well” – “Yes I have been to sleep - crossed out] William gave another illustration. He said: - “Some times they did this: Some pretended friends would engage a man in talk in the bush. All at once one would say “look at all those whitefellows – or at those birds – or something or other”. When the man looks round one hits him at the back of the neck with a [clu - crossed out] Kūjerŭng. Then they would roll him about for a long time to make his mūrŭp come out of him. Then they would take out his kidney fat and shut him up again. After they had gone he would wake up and go home. Some clever fellow would say “you do not look well!” – “No, I have been asleep over there”. You should not do that, someone might catch you”. – Bye and bye the man dies.

Last edit 3 months ago by ALourie
20

20

When there were [w - crossed out] many hole [that they could] pointing in different directions they said “there were many people against him” Then the Wiriarap went at night to the grave and sate there and watched. He would see the “Murup” of the blackfellow who had killed the man come sneaking up andlook at the grave. The Wirarap would carefully keep himself quiet so as to see the face. Then he would know who the man was and tell therelations of the dead person. —

Last edit 12 months ago by ALourie
23

23

149 The corpse was tied up in his possum rug and wore his full corroboree dress apron – headband – necklace +c and his “nŭtba” (bag) of a Doctor. They gave him his tomahawk but no other weapons lest when his ghost walked about it might hurt some one. The hands were crossed on the breast and the knees drawn up so that when the body was lowered with the circular pose the deceased as it were crouched in it. William remembered one case where the dead man's "Mŭriwŭnwas stuck in the grave at his right hand– [?W?] said the “old man from Dandenong“give him a mŭriwŭn in his hand for he never missed a Kangaroo”. Thedeceased was William's father's brother.The old man from Dandenong was half ngūrŭng-gaeta + half wirirap —

10 The Kūlin believed that a man’s ghost wandered about the country and occasionally returned to the grave. As William said “Bye and bye that Mūrŭp coming back to the grave looks down at it and says – Hallo! that’s my possum rug down there – there are also my old body and my old bones” – then he goes away again. Ghosts were supposed to be invisible to everyone except the wizard to whom they communicated information and corroboree songs (gūnyūrū) —

The ghosts are supposed also to be able to go up to Tharangalk (tharan = trees galk = wood) which is in fact the sky. William said the Kūlin believed there were many “cherry trees” up there and [rivers - crossed out] streams and rivers.

[written sideways in left side margin]William also said that he had heard that in some parts of the country dead bodies were rolled into a fire and burned up.

[written in left side margin]See further on

Last edit 3 months ago by ALourie
24

24

15The ghosts were supposed to be both male and female. They had small darts of wood with which they killed game for thedarts were [??] “mūng”. It was also believed as the old people told William that when a hunter killed a possum or some other game in the bush and cooked it and eat it the ghosts came up after he hadgone and finished what he leftand warmed themselves at his fire.

A man's mūrŭp could leave him when he slept and wander about but as it could not get past the Tharangalk-bek it had to return and then the person wakes. The time when the mūrŭp could get away was when the person snored.

William expressed it thus:“when I sleep and snore my mūrŭp goes away to Tharangalk-bek (the wooded country) but cannot get into it and so comes back” – when I am asleep my mūrŭp can talk to other mūrŭps – for instance of my father or of any one else”. —

William then went on to give an instance in this [?line?]: —“When I get home from taking my poor fellow to the hospital – Tommy Punch [who - crossed out] and I were crying about him all evening. Then Tommy went to sleep and when he woke he said “I saw the poor fellow – he was here – he said stand there. There were two strings hanging down and he said we will go up them - do’nt [sic] be afraid you wo’nt [sic] fall down. I climbed up after him and we came to a square hole – and a lot of people looking down at us. The boy went through and said to me “I am only waiting here for you and my father”. – one of the girls said “How is my mother” – [she - crossed out] I said why it looks like our Mimey!” Then I went up also and I saw a lot of people there”.

[written in left side margin]

Yayŭt-gin = dream Ye-mūn = sleepYe-mŭn-ŭra = snoring

DavidHis son whodied then

Last edit 3 months ago by ALourie
26

26

16William gave a further illustration of his belief as to Dreams: “The Mūrŭps can get food any where. With their little things like spears they can get KangaroosEmus – any animals. Besides the Whitefellows Mūrŭps can do the same – they have carts and bullock drays and can get food, apples and bread anywhere, because no one can see them.

Once when I was asleep I dreamed I was in a gully in the ranges; the piece of rock I sate on slid down the gully with me. Then I stood up and looked round and I saw a big rock before me. I said “Hallo! because when I looked at it I saw it was stuck all over with gold. I dreamed this three times. I dreamed I was going out for wallaby and I never was at that place before. My Mūrŭp had gone into the mountains. Every time I go out into the mountains I try to find this gully. I cannot find it yet – it must be further out. My Mūrŭp has not taken me to it yet.

Not only [is - crossed out] was each human individual supposed [by William - crossed out] by the Kūlin according to King Williamto have a Mūrŭp but each animal was also supposed to have one. For instance as he said “The Mūrŭp of a possum is just like a possum – the wirriraps can see it”.

As an instance he told the following: - “The Mūrŭp give the Coroboree songs to the Wiriraps. A man called Kŭrbūrū who lived at Dandenong used to be able to tell the Kūlin when the Berbira were coming after them to catch them.

Last edit 3 months ago by ALourie
27

27

17This man was a Būnjil (Thara) hisown name was Kŭrbūrū (native bear) and he got it because when once he killed a native bear its mūrŭp went with him. After that it taught him a “gūnyūrū” which was a follows: -Enagourea nūng ngalourmaThere is now cut acrossbarein gūrūkba = mŭrneintrack bloodbūrūnbai nganūng ba hurt myselflil-lira = mŭr-ing-achipped tomahawk.

of this William gave the following free translation.“You cut across my [and - crossed out] track where I wasgoing to the foot of the range and you cominghit me and spilled my heart's blood and broke your tomahawk on my head”.

A second illustration of the statement that animals have a mūrŭp as follows: -Waa (crow) has a mūrŭp. It is very good and never touches anyone to hurt them. If a Waa comes over you and cries out Wa!-wa!-wa! then you know that your enemies are about. Then you say to him “Kūlindat mela?” (Blacks – where?). Then he says wa wa wa! again over you and flies off saying still wa! wa! wa!. Then you run afterhim to escape”.

When I asked him whether the Eaglehawk (Bunjil) ever gavewarning he said: -“As to Bunjil he does not come nearus but I remember that once when

[written in left side margin]note thatWilliam is a waa himself

Last edit 3 months ago by ALourie
43

43

30The Songs

Turnbull was buried near Bacchus Marsh at Tŭllŭrwill, in the Kŭrŭng-jerŭng balluck, of the Werribigalluck R. Not his country not far off – His country was Gisborne and the hill near Gisborne - Bullanyaruck.Yarŭk killed him I think from Echuca. He died about the time the Brighton Railway was made and the Railway to Geelong. His mūrŭp came to his [brothe - crossed out] younger brother - Wenberri and sang this song in him when he slept:NgeTui gar ngal a ngibnba nallūgaLet us go there bone alldí u [gillan - crossed out] dirún-ding nga Dŭllŭr =Dullur willurtall shining white ([on that -crossed out] this?) (country)= willuit [wá-wein dŭn - crossed out]wa neindŭngthe rushing noise of[nŭng - crossed out] Bŭnjil main menngaláBunjil father of [we two - crossed out] oursyaw-a- būllūklevelyēnnin thŭllŭrmeik ngasinging in my chest thiswūrngállūk gueik [lugeik - crossed out]in my inside

This almost makes me cry. Wenberri used to sing this song.

[written at top of page]Insert at [??] about Capt Turnbull

Last edit 3 months ago by ALourie
91

91

6 63Tarung-oura - burning – like the inside of a burnt kiln on fire. This is a Westernport word meaning some fire burning under the ground. The Ngamat is when the sun goes down – that is when it is so red – the Tarung-oura is there. [The Westernport blacks - crossed out] The sunset red colours are called Kar–alk.When a person died he was supposed to go to the Kar-alk. When the body is burned and the Mūrŭp goes to theNgamat – and causes the Karalk. When he comes back he is Ngamajet.This is the Westernport belief. --- William's people called the sky Kar-alk.

The sun

People said the Sun was a woman, the sister of every body. She has a lot of sisters. [Th - crossed out] She went round by the sea at night and reappeared in the morning.

The Moon

An eclipse of the moon was supposed to be the blood and mūrup of some person killed which got in it. This showed that people had been killed a long way off.

Once the moon was once people in this world. It wanted to give the old Kūlina drink of water so that when they died they could after two or three days come back fresh. The Bronzewing pigeon would not agree to this but wanted wanted [sic] them not to have any so that when men died and went away they would not come back again.

Last edit 3 months ago by ALourie
93

93

The Wizards

The Wirarap D bauk = high up He belonged to thelived near Mt could bring back when it had left hto the Karalk (sunset place)[on that at nea - crossed out] after the white menwhen there were some houses at Heidand a few at Bacchus Marsh – alsthe time when I had a little whiskers(about 40 [years - crossed out] 45 years ago? AWH) a black fellow was nearly dead at Heidelberg. His friends were all round him - and they sent for Doro-bauk. When he came the man's [Mūrŭp was gone for he - crossed out] was only just breathing the very least possible and his Mūrŭp was gone - nothing remaining in him but a little wind. Doro-bauk went off after the Mūrŭp and after a time returned with it under his 'possum rug. He had caught it by the middle before it had got near to the Karalk. If it had got down there he could not have caught it. The man was just breathing a little wind – his eyes [were quite shut and he- crossed out] Doro-bauk laid himself down on the dead man and put the mūrŭp into him. After a time the man came to life again.

When people seemed likely to die the Wirrarap was sent for to watch him and to catch the mūrŭp if it tried to get away.

It was the mūrŭp which taught the Wirrarap first, and which flew with him when he wanted to go any where or to go up to the Tharangalk (sky).

Last edit 3 months ago by ALourie

hw0390 Notes by Howitt on the Kulin Nation

1

1

The Kulin Tribe

References

Other tribe 68 & 72Wurundjeri – 67Boonorung - 67

Boundaries 67, 53-54, 59 and tribes of Kulin Nation - 11Mitialūn? 8 – 9 – 50 56. Death 10 – medicine men 10, The Bone 11. Kidney fat 12.Burial 62 13 – ghost – 141 Murup of animal 16 – Eaglehawk carries off child 18 – Messengers 56. Visitors 3.[?]Sex totems 41 18 – Bunjil legend 56 22 – Infanticide 22 – Bunjil went up 23 – World groups 23 – Burning the land 23 –Signal left at camp 24 – Blood feud 43 25 – Wūiberi’s song 30 – Dream of Kangaroo 31. 5Food prohibitions of novices 32 – Headman 5 33-34-35-38 39-55-56 Stealing tomahawk stone 36 – Tomahawk quarry 38Totems – stars 57 44 – Pleiades 45 – Stars 56 Mariné bek[?] 50 47 – Nose boring 49 – Waang & Bunjil sticks 50 – Country will one hand over[?] – 51 – Smoke Signals 52 – Jajaurong 53 – Thunder 55. Bull roarer 55Widows 55 - Languages 58 – clans ([...]) 58 – Exchange of food 59 - 60.Camping rules 66 Buckley 61. Wifes mother 61 – Six wives – one Headman 62.Ngamat – 62 - 63 The sun & moon 63 – aurora 64 – old people, care of 64, - Bunjil 64Bringing back the dead murup 65 The Wurūnjeri – 53. 59. 40. 1Border of Kulin & tribes having Krokitch & Ganitch at St Arnaud.Captain” – whose “mir” is Moiwilluk a [...]. “[D..]” who is Garilunka[?] […]Theddura mittung at great Kulin meeting 67Names of Redgum & Banksia 67.Names of places – 68 Jajauwong 54Bilbileri 36, 39Turnbull 34 34 A, 39Bebejern - 37 Bŭngerim 46 Malcolm – 39 The Kŭrnŭng-willum tribes – p 39. 37. 3, [...]_______________________Latrobe PapersCannibalism .p 1 - war implements -10 – Billibileri – 10 – Gippsland blacks 11Signal fire p 3Chiefs – 4. Old men 4. 5. [E..] men 9.[2 words illeg] 5. good feeling any[?] them[?] 5.Burial 5. Orphans 6. Marriage 6. Laws 6. Murder 7 […]alliance of tribes 7. would never die for[?] 8 Kidney fat 8Dances 8 – games 8 – Bunjil 11, Bunbeal[?] 11, [...] 11, Making of men -12The flood 13 – Wind 13 – Thunder 13 – Native bear 13 – Wombat 14D.. 15 – Murrina Koodung[?] 15 – Camps 15 – Fight between [Dan..] and Buninyong[?] blacks north of Melbourne 17 – […] of different tribes together 19.ceremony of Jenderrum 20 – of Murrum Jukkerook 22 ceremony of Tib-bib 23.

Last edit about 2 months ago by ALourie
Records 1 – 30 of 31