Howitt and Fison Papers

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Sydney Address309 Pitt Street

Ravensworth,Goulburn, 11th January 1886

Dear

I have the honour to inform you that I am a candidate forone of the vacant seats at the Board of Directors of the Australian MutualProvident Society, and to solicit the favour of your vote and interest. Ihave been long and favourably known in this Colony, and hope my characteras a financier is sufficiently well established to secure me your support.

I desire to call your attention to the By Law at the foot ofthis circular, from which you will see that [plumping?] for one candidate is not allowed. Each member must vote for as many candidates as there are seats vacant.

Should you do me the honour of electing me, you may dependupon my devoting my time and energy to the best interests of the Society.

I am,Yours faithfullyFrancis Tait

N. B. -- By the XIX By Law, "Any member wishing to vote shall personally erase from such list the names of such candidates as he may not desire to vote for, retaining no more and no less than the numberof seats vacant, and shall sign each list and return the same by post in each envelope." A non-compliance with any one or all of these conditions renders the vote absolutely invalid and of no effect.

Last edit 7 months ago by ALourie

XM759_ICDMS_lowres

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The Colonials in South AfricaCapt John Stirling-----------------------------------------------In Gum fruit on [?] [there?] are E. [?]; E. rubida, E. muzzlewoodon sedimentary rocks - E. [amyg.] when[Good?] loam?], E. pauci., E. rubida[Banksia [spin?]

Gums [?] [road?] at the same to "[Muz? abutt?] [?] - by many - boxE. albens, Yellow Box - E. pauci.E. gunii; at the mine - E. globulusE. Rubida, at the creek in thefern forest common also [word crossed out] Yellow box, E. albens, -

At the mine they use for props 1. E. [macrorhyncha?], E. obliqua, [word crossed out]E rubida, E. [amyg.] hard leaf - there are [?] in them [?]

[next page]

of merit. [E. vim?] is brittle -----------------------------------------22 May 1907paid Cusack 9/-up long gully - E. vim. in creek E. globulus - in places up gully E. rubida, E. albens - In full bloom. E. vim, E. albens.--------------[Near?] Muzzlewood in bloomat [Dargo?] [Bruthen?] --------------------------------------------------------------W. H. [Blakeby?] & co.115 Collins StreetMelbourne-----------------------------------------23 May[?] [hill?] [?]--------------------------------------------24 may[Misery?] [Ck?]

Last edit about 2 months ago by Christine

XM24_ICDMS_lowres R F Beardsmore to Howitt 23 August 1907

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Office of Board for Protection of Aborigines111, Phillip-streetSydney 23rd August 1907

SirI have the honour to acknowledge the receipt ofyour letter dated the 26th inst. further, respectingthe Aborigines in the Bourkedistrict,

and to inform you that the matter is being inquired into,and you will be further communicated with. The reprint of your address did notcome to hand, and I should very muchlike to have a copy

I have the honour to beSir Your obedient ServantR. H BeardsmoreSecretary, A. P. Board.

26 8 081. I send new copy of Address2. Shall I send further questions to himfor manager of BrewarrinaCummeragunjaBrungleor write directHe will see that new issuesarose as work progressedor when I send the replyto my queriesA. W. Howitt, Esq.,ClovellyMetung, Vic

Last edit about 2 months ago by ALourie

XM265_ICDMS_lowres J C Muirhead to Howitt 4 September 1899

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ClermontSept 4th 1899

A. W. Howitt EsqFinch StreetEast MalvernVictoria

Dear Sir,I have just received yourletter of the 3rd August, I am of the opinion thatyour northern correspondent, is in error, when heasserts that there are certain food prohibitions thateffects certain classes in the tribes of northern Queensland(I take that this food prohibition denies the memberthe use of such food all through his life) if so I ampositive he is wrong- As I have before stated to youall young men previous to going through theBora rites, (that is before initiation) areprohibited fromeating certain game, such as Emu,Blackheaded snake, ([?cuthajoah?]) plain turkey, porcup-ine, and the male of certain wallaby (paddymellons). But once confirmed to Bora lawsall food restrictions are removed - (I thereforethink that if your correspondent enquires deeply intothe matter that he will find, that after ceremonys [sic] the foodprohibition is removed). I am aware that owing tothe class totem system, certain Blacks (male + female)will not kill game which they call Father; For examplea Blackfellow, calling "Frill Lizard" (Binnungutrrah)(His father) would hold that reptile sacred + hewould protect it, + not kill it, (not allow anotherto kill it in his presence) another Blackwould call the "Screech Owl" his father, +likewise hold it sacred + protect it = and sofar does this law work that I have known aBlack when he could not get satisfaction, outof an antagonist, to take advantage

[written in left side margin]Frill LizardBinnungurrah

Last edit about 2 months ago by ALourie

XM267_ICDMS_lowres J C Muirhead to Howitt 30 March 1900

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Daintree StreetClermontMarch 30th 1900

A. W. Howitt EsqEast MalvernVictoria

Dear SirI am in answer to yourof the 20th MarchWith respect to the puzzle arising in MrCraig's Wiagrain, it seems to me thatMr Craig has got the primary + subclasses mixed. Wootheroo or Woothooroobeing the primary class of Wongo+ Obu. The mistake could arise thisway- if Mr Craig asked a Blackwhat class "that one" meaning a thirdperson, if a male (Wongo) the replywould come Wootheroo - if a womanthe speaker would reply, Wootheroocanmeaning the primary class - for Blacksin hailing a stranger call for hisprimary class. Having ascertainedthat the [sic] ask for his totem + thenthey could almost instantly tell the subclass.Then again at times you will meetin tribes a man Mallera (primary)class, yet Emu totem. I couldnever get to the right explanationof how he could be Mallera +have the Emu (Woothera) totem.The Blacks alway [sic] answered if youcome to our (Umbah) Boraceremony, then we will explain.

Last edit about 2 months ago by ALourie

XM268_ICDMS_lowres J C Muirhead to Howitt 18 June 1902

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Daintree StreetClermontJune 18th 1902

A. W. Howitt EsqClovillyMetungVictoria

My Dear Sir

I am receipt [sic] of yourletter ins dated above "adress"Re Wakelburra message stick to yange burra(Blackall) Question (1) was wallaby orEmu, totem of either sender or receipetive [sic] ofmessage stick. It could be because the Senderbeing initiated could kill + eat the Game)But the message would be to Tarramasthose men who could hold + preform [sic]ceremony of initiates or candidatesat Boras (Umbahs)

Question (3) Kergilla + Banbecould hunt + kill game: "Yes"

Last edit about 2 months ago by ALourie

tip70-10-5-1 Fison to Frazer 29/8/01

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actually thanked me for it. So youwill doubtless receive copies of the "Leader"with the illustrated articles in them.May I suggest that when you get them youwrite a line of acknowledgement to himdirect? It will make him amiable, + wemay want to get something more outof him. (David Syme Esq. "Age Office, Collins St., Melbourne)

I have no recollection of the parts ofyour Golden Bough (new Edn) on which I sent you afew notes. I have marked a number of places,but cannot remember which of them I annotated in myletter. If you will send it back to me, I will try to send you something more.

I had a letter from Spencer dated July 15They were then at Barrow Creek + on the eve of going farhternorth. He gives his new address as PowellCreek via Port Darwin, + a letter fromyou would give him great pleasure. But I daresay you also have heard from himlately.

My sister, Mrs Potts, after a year of wandering among out Kinsfolk, has settledagain in rooms at Cambridge - 52 TrumpingtonSt. opposite the Fitzwilliam. I am sureshe would be glad if Mrs Frazer would callupon her. Her late husband gave £1000 toTrinity.Yours very sincerelyLorimer Fison

Last edit 5 months ago by ALourie

tip70-10-49-1-1 Fison to Frazer 29/08/1901

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actually thanked me for it. So you will doubtless receive copies of the "Leader"with the illustrated articles in them.May I suggest that when you get them youwrite a line of acknowledgement to him direct? It will make him amiable, + onemay want to get something more outof him. (David Syme Esq. "Age" Office, Collins St., Melbourne)

I have no recollection of the parts ofyour Golden Bough (new Edn) on which I sent you afew notes. I have marked a number of placesbut cannot remember which of them I annotated in myletter. If you will send it back tome, I will try to send you something more.

I had a letter from Spencer dated July 15.They were then at Barrow Creek + on the eve of going farthernorth. He gives his new address as PowellCreek via Port Darwin, + a letter fromyou would give him great pleasure. But Idaresay you also have heard from him lately.

My sister, Mrs Potts, after a year ofwandering among our Kinsfolk, has settledagain in rooms at Cambridge - 52 TrumpingtonSt., opposite the Fitzwilliams. I am sure she would be glad if Mrs Frazer would callupon her. Her late husband gave £1000 for Trinity. Yours very sincerelyLorimer Fison

Last edit 5 months ago by ALourie

hw0416 Notes from Shillinglaw's book

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2 the southward during the night by a tide orcurrent from the apparent straights; and at daylight finding himself near the shipreturned on board. At 11 Capt Woodriffand Lieut. Tuckey came to the camp, who producedto the Governor a chart, the survey of about90 miles round the bay from Arthurs Seat(the highest hill on the East side of the bay)and had landed in several places toobserve the soil trees and to obtain waterThe report was - the soil bad, trees very smalland but little water" - p 91

[paragraph crossed out]

On the 22 Saturday when Lieut Tuckeywent to Survey from the N.W. point of the bayhe says that Mr Tuckey found a fresh waterriver in the NE [??] of the baywhen they pitched their camp for the night p. 92 and it was on thefollowing morning apparently at 8amthat the blacks appeared - whileMr Tucker + Mr Collins had gone acrossthe bay about 5 or 6 miles [??] a boat's crew leaving Mr Harris + Mr Gammonwith 2 men at the camp.

Last edit 3 months ago by ALourie

hw0391 Notes by Howitt on Kulin from Barak

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[newspaper article]Argus28/4/06Suburban Native NamesOrigin of “Prahran,” &c.Writing from Merchiston-Hall, Geelong, Mr. G. F. Belcher says: -“In going through some old papers not long since I came across a letter from an old friend, Mr George Langhorne, dealing with native names. Mr Langhorne was sent to Port Phillip by the Sydney Governor (Sir Richard Bourke) to establish an aboriginal protectorate, the chief object being to look after the moral training of native boys.

“Soon after my arrival in Melbourne (early in 1839) I became acquainted with Mr Langhorne, who arrived in 1836. His camp was situate on the Yarra, near “Punt Hill.’ Many an evening I spent with him in his tent, which was surrounded by the mia-mias of the natives. As a rule, the natives never cared to remain long in any locality, and so Mr Langhorne moved about fromtime to time, changing his camp to suit the wishes of his proteges. Mr Langhorne held a great influence over the natives, and often was the means of preventing tribal fights.”

The letter from Mr Langhorne is dated Botany, October, 1889. It runs thus: - “With regard to the origin of the word ‘Prahran’ – now, I believe, a large town or city – on a mizzley, rainy day of late autumn in 1837 Robert Hoddle (surveyor-general) strolled into my hut, at the Government sta-tion at Pur-ra-ran, for so I named it - a com-pound of two aboriginal words, meaning land partially surrounded by water. This was the aboriginal station assigned to me by the Governor (Sir Richard Bourke), for the purpose of forming a nucleus establish-ment for the care and Christian training of the aborigines of Port Phillip.

“ ‘Busy? said my visitor.“ ‘Yes; always busy.’“ ‘Lovely spot, this.’

“It was a lovely spot, at the bend of the river, opposite to what we call the 'Go-vernment-house Paddock,’ on a rising ground, forming a fine, grassy slope to the river, well cropped by sheep that had been a short while camped there after landing from Van Diemen’s Land. In the rear was a large and picturesque swamp, which thenatives told me was named after me. To the southward was a rising ground, from which we could see Hobson’s Bay, about two miles distant.

“ ‘I have called on you,’ said Hoddle, ‘to get some native names for the districts or parishes around in county Bourke.’

“ ‘I am glad to hear it,’ I replied.

Hoddle went on, ‘Now, first, what do you call this place, ‘Purrarhan,’ and ‘Jika Jika’ after?’

“ ‘After the chief, Wanorong, who claims the district as his country. And you may call one parish “Kulbundora,” others “Ker-bukena,” “Yall Yall.” Tullamarena,""Tallanghata." "Tarook" (the names of several fine boys, who were with me in camp).’

Kulbundora was the eldest son of Jika-Jika, the chief. Old Tukulneen was the former chief, but was superseded owing to his advanced age. ‘Tarook’ I named after the black crow, which abounded that time in the district.’

“A day or two after my interview with Hoddle, the boy Kulbundora, a fine lad of 14, who was acquiring English rapidly, walked into my hut, and, seating himself close to me, commenced to exhibit proof of his progress in the language by singing ‘what shall we do with the drunken sailor early in the morning?’ He mimicked the drunken man as he sang the refrain. The song he had learned at a brickmakers’ canteen. When I visited Melbourne in 1851 (I have not been there since), passing down Collins-street I was startled by a voice from the opposite side calling out my (native) name, Tukul-reen, when a tall black ran over to me. ‘Ah, Yall Yall, is that you?’ I inquired after the lads mentioned above, and received the sor-rowful answer to each inquiry, ‘To-Ke-Ko lang’ (all dead and gone), only 12 years after I resigned the care of them. I presume now that very few of the Wawarongs of Mel-bourne, the Watowrongs of Geelong, the Borawongs of Westernport remain. They numbered in 1837 about 1,000 or 1,200; within 50 miles of Melbourne none re-main.”

Last edit 2 months ago by ALourie

hw0182 Howitt to Cameron 29/11/1899

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Spring StreetMelbourne29.11.99

A. L. P. Cameron EsqMurrumbong NSWMy dear SirI observed your address in "Nature"the other day and avail myself of theknowledge to again write to you. I have duringthe last twelve months been working almostconstantly at my long projected work on theAustralian Aborigines and anyone willunderstand, points crop up from time totime for which I require further information.Such a case is the marriage laws of the four classes, or as I now term themthe four sub-classes. I have been trying

Last edit 2 months ago by ALourie

hw0156 Greenway to Howitt 2/July/1901

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Howard hamTarro Hunter River2d July 1901

ToMr A. W. Howitt"Steanor" Finch StreetEast Malverne [sic] Vict

Dear SirI have to ask your for-giveness for leaving so long aninterval to elapse between thereceival of your letter of 18th Aprand my reply. I have beenmuch away from home andyour letter has been overlandinadvertently therefore [??]my attention.

I am at present, and forsome time past have been engaged in writing matter re

Last edit about 2 months ago by ALourie

hw0170 Port Jackson tribe notes

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Port JacksonCollinsNSW Engcoing the SunYen-na-dah the moonBir-rong A starMo-loo-mo-long The PleiadesWar-re-wull The Milky WayCa-ra-go-ro A cloudBoo-do-en-onggeneral nameCal-gal-le-on The MagellanieThe greater cloudsGnar-rang-al-le-onThe lesserTu-ru-ga A star fallingCo-ing bi-bo-ba Sun risingBour-ra the skyCo-ing-bur-re-goo-lah sun settingGam-mar-rooTar-re-ber-re DayGwe-yong fireCad-jee smokeGil-le A sparkPer-mul Earth

Last edit 7 months ago by ALourie

hw0369 Howitt to E. Robertson 18/05/1906

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Public Health Department295 Queen StreetMelbourne, C. 1, 28.4.1937

Dear Mr KenyonFound the enclosed letterwhen clearing up my papers and amsending it on to you in the hopethat it may possibly be usefulYours sincerelyE Robertson

Mr A. S. Kenyon

[written in pencil]Mr McCallumask1.5.37

In ManFor cataloguing

Last edit 7 months ago by ALourie

hw0246 Christison to Howitt 30/01/1887

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doubt this explanation, I will write you again upon the matter.

My Wife and children sail by the "Parramatta" from Sydney on the 17th prot.. I then go on to Lammermoor to devote some months on business matters. If there is any more information I can give you, pray do not spare [underlined] me, for I shall havethe time and opportunity to give you reliable answere to any questions upon which you desire information.

When will your work be ready for the publisher? My Sydney address up to the 18th Feb. is C/o Misses Griffiths & Weaver. Hunter Street Sydney. Mrs Christison desires to be kindly remembered to you.

Yours sincerelyR. Christison

P.S. A full brother has the priority of right.I think brothers from the same mother stand as a more certain proof of parentage. R.C.

Last edit 7 months ago by ALourie

tip70-10-34-12 Howitt to Fison 29 July 1880

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to get hold of their [?] - at any rate they are nowwilling to tell all they know and the [?mounted] [?constable]seems to have an average amount of [?]

As to McLennan you knew before this that I put aside both ourreplies. But I am not satisfied. I think of writing a letter to"Nature" pointing out that our intended reply has been put asidethrough the lamented death [?] [?] that as it seems justpossible that readers of K & K may read our statements as didour [?] critic in a manner not [words crossed out] intended by us.I ask permission to say in your words [?] [?] [?] three pointsthat [?] arise - I think this might be done nicely andkeep the pot boiling as well as not in any way causeantagonistic feelings in this Late McLennan's friend. I shallsketch it out - if you think [?well] you might draft the preliminaryparagraphs as I think you can do the sweet, courteousmuch better than I can. This would save time. I will write aletter to Tyler on the subject of [?] [?] [?] so soon as Ican see my way. At present I feel overwhelmed withworkand are all behind. My Anthrological correspondenceis becoming serious as I have not time to reply to my 52 correspondentsbut to galvanize them into life occasionally and to "educate"about 50 of them for the work. You see that I use the [?Delegation] stamp - I find it has a good effect upon my correspondents.

Mr Frazer has found me a very good source of Kamilaroiinformation from where I have now a long and mostinteresting amount of Kamilaroi customs bearing uponour enquiries. He gave a complete explanation of the sensationalaccount of Australian Marriage given by Collins in his workin New South Wales - I think Lubbock quotes it. We look forwardwith great pleasure to tje new year where we hope to see you inGippsland.Yours faithfullyAW Howitt

Last edit 3 months ago by HelenB
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