Howitt and Fison Papers

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Search for Jajaurong* Jajowerong* Jajawrung* Jajauwurong* Jajowrong* Jajawrong* Jajaurung* Jajorung* Jajarwrong* Jajauwrung* Jajowerung* Jajowerūng* jajauworung* "Jaj owurrong" Ja-jow-er-ong* Jajoworong* Ja-jau-rong* Jajawerrung* jajaurung* Jajau* Daujerang* Jajau'rung* Jajauworung* Jajauwrong* Jajoworung*

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Barter

Yuin

At the end of the Bunan, when the boys have goneoff themselves and before the different lots of peoplesreturn to their own localities, a kind of marketwas held, in some clear space near the camp whenthe people laid out the things they had brought with them.A man would say "share such and such things" another would bargain for them. A complete setis one ngulia (belt of possum fur [?]) four Burrian (kilt)one gumbrum and one complete set of Kubbutguruthat is corroboree things. It was the rule that a completeset went together. Weapons might be given in exchange.A complete set of weapons was the fighting boomerang[(.........)?] Warangun, ten grass treeand jagged wood pointed spears (Bembaia) -for club fighting (Millidu), one [....] club [(gud-ju-rung)or (Bundi) and one spear thrower (wommera).The women also enjoyed in this trade exchangingpossum rugs, bags - yam sticks (tuali) [...] -[......]

Last edit about 1 year ago by J Gibson

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that the [Dade?]the sky like a vault [rests?]is clear. The [Malthe-malthu?] [legend?] p -) sectsthe [Mirra muira?] -, having killed a kangaroo stretched out its skin as the [vault?] of the sky, having first [pinned?] the edges in the ground, and having found the [?] [?] satisfied and a new [?] when came after us can walk about without [?].

Chapter 8 Beliefs--------------------------$1. The Universe, The earth, sky, sun, moon, stars [xct?] $2 The human spirit, ghost [xct?]$3 The whiteman as a ghost$4 Burial practices$5 The sky-country,it's inhabitants [xct?] (a) ghosts (b) supernatural beings$6 The tribal All-father[Line crossed out]--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------S1 The Universe--------------------------There seems to be a widespread belief that the earth is a flat surface, surmounted by the solid vault of the sky.[1 1/2 lines crossed out]The [Ūri-ūlū?] [Good?] (?) tells him after the holding of the [Wilyarū?] ceremony they went on their wanderings, and finally what may briefly termed abeyond the mountains passed through what may briefly termed a "hard darkness" into another country, whence looking back they recognised what they had passed through was the edge of the sky. The [Kapiri?] legend (p - ) shows this (Here other evidence from [?] [?]).

Left hand margin and to be inserted here: the earth is supportedthe [?] [nature?] the [maia nusea?] - ?having [se?] its bounds to the north which is wandering (There [A djaitum?] [?]

A [Wotjoballuk?] legend runs that at first the sky rested on the earth and prevented the sun from moving, until [Gorŭk?], the magpie ( ), propped it up with a long stick, so that the sun could move and so since then she(2) has gone round and round.

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that the earth is flat, and the [Jajaurung?] that the earth is flat and was in darkness until the sun was made by [Pupperinbuk?], who was one of the race who inhabited the earth at that time, and whom they called the [Nurrumbung-utt?] [?] 2. (see p ).

The [Worworŭng?] also believe ["that the flat earth" to be inserted here]that the sky was propped up with poles where it rested on the mountains in the north-east.

Before the "whitemen came to Melbourne", a message was passed from tribe to tribe, that the props were becoming rotten and that unless tomahawks were at once sent up to cut new ones the sky would fall, and [burat?] and all the people would be drowned. (4)

This same belief is mentioned by Buckley/William Buckley, but in a different form, namely that the earth was supported by props, which were in the "charge of a man who lived at the end of the earth" (5).

A similar message which the [wimera?], having been passed down the River Murray, from tribe to tribe. It was [?] the props which suppor-ted the earth were rotten and unless tomahawks were sent, to cut fresh ones, the earth would fall down and every one would be killed (4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------------(I) The life and adventures of William Buckley by John MorganHobart 1852

(2) The [?] a [wimare?] - fee for. (3) [?] p 201 (4) [?](5) J Shaw

Last edit 10 months ago by Christine

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was [?] under Jakke-jakke living about the Yarra flats and onthe northern slopes of the Dandenong mountains. the third were the "real"Wurrunjeri. who lived on the western side of the Saltwater river, undertheir Headman Bungerin, and extended as far as Mount Macedon.

Immediately adjoining the Wurrunjeri country on the [North crossed out] Westside, was that of the Kurunjang-Wilam (2) who are also Woewurrung , whose Headman was one [Ningulabul], known to thewhitemen as Captain Turnbull.. Ningulabul was a great maker of songs,which as Berak said "made people glad when they heard them". But whenhe sang one of them [?} [?} it had the contraryeffect, for it made him shed tears. Ningulabul came of a family of giftedsingers for his father and grandfather before him had been renowned [?]and this, as well as his own poetical powers, was the cause of his greatauthority as a Ngurung-aeta, not only his own tribe but also in thoseadjoining. the case of Ningulabul shows how headmanship was hereditaryin a family whosemembers were gifted beyond their fellows.

On the north side of Mount Macedon were the Gal-gal-balluk, part ofthe Jajau'rung tribe, whose headman was known to the whitemen as"King Bobby" and who was the "partner" (3) of Ningulabul. If the latter wished tobring people from further north he sent "his word" to "Bobby" who againsent his "word" on bythe next headman. to the westwardof Ningulabulwas [?] the Headman of the [?]????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

Most of those Headmen were related to eachother, by marriage, andthus, where as in a family such as that of Ningulabul, there wastendancy for authority to become hereditary, there was thegerm of a practice which under favorable circumstamces might have

?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????/

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Leaur-gura -balluknow the mountain where Parkers Stationwas. name ginojaugWhen CampseNot many there was Bunjil.at Daylesford all the [??] when harmfulare all ? [Kalk Kalk crossed out] (with gal gal under) Bullung- all wang.Leaur gura tallung have spears [??] [woiwrung?]only with a [??][??] Jajawrung

Last edit over 1 year ago by CoreyTheatre
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Leaūr-gūra-balluknow the mountainwhere Parkers stationwas. name Qūrojang[Have then language?]No wang there only Bunjil.At Daylesford all the Range when wambatare all gal-gal ['Kalk-kalk' crossed out] Bullūg- all wang.

Leaūrgura falling [?]speak ['3 language' crossed out] Woiworungout with a sharp [??][??] Jajoworong half[??]5.6.6.8. list [??](9) all the mothers and women

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the Bullawangs may betribal [crossed out 'fathers and uncles or older brothers'] uncles (Datak)But in following the Krauan& Bullawangs the old women& old men ask wheredid your grandfather(paternal come from) -

Thursday evening about sundown the Tūtanaring wereplaced on the groundthe Krauan behind them and Old Mary [?] represented all the mothers. Jonny Fidgett waited with the boys as master of the ceremonies. Old William & Dick walked about. The men all went away to chat[?]and after a time – William gave the signal to be ready.

Last edit 3 months ago by ALourie

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husband nangūrūng husbands broth. nangūrūng husband sist husband Dangan or dedjetBrothers wife birmbangF. brother wife ūmŭrkwife - birmbang or ūmŭrkwife sister birmbangwife sister husband Kairep (friend)F Sist husband nangūrūng F Brothers wife YumŭrkM wifes brother goreitch M sister's Husband [Fourwords crossed out]

M wae- M wee F wei_______ __________F Bunjil F Bunjil M Bunjil

goureith

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Notes on the aborigines of Yarra tribe

Kūlin - Westernport Kūlin down toTarwin - both sideBū nū rūng.go to Geelong - Bacchus Marsh - Mt MacedonKilmore, Benalla, WangarattaBuffalo River __________________William's tribe BunyipAll [?Westernport?] - Mount MacedonKilmore, Heidelberg.Plenty River, Kangaroo Ground.1 about Kew - Ūrŭndjeri willŭm2 [Westernport - crossed out] Cranbourne - Būlūk-willŭm3 Dandenong - Ngairāk-willŭm[Cannot read word]4. Mordiallok - Būnwūrŭng

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some vege.

Timber cut at mill is: (1) E. regnans from top of hill a sound clear cut by timber from from gum trees - no name(2) E. Sieberiana (a - called white ironbark gum [top?]silver top(3) E. capitellata - called yellow stringybark(4) E. obliqua called - white ironbark

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Ask William and Captain(1) which way Jajaurung drilledfire(2) Burial directionN - WarautN 25 W - Wartrout tp d/75WX - KraugaiN69 - Bopal Boopel - direction?S E L-S 10 W - Tall au5 15 W tp NS0W Kraugai direction?(3) man costume woeworngjajaurung(talk chalks)(4) How long [???] - how high- bigger than mouse?(5) Man brother - women tribe[???]

Last edit 2 months ago by Christine
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what did the Jajau -think od them. Why didmen not like them to bekilled. ---

(6) Did they ever hear of men running down [????]men Juia on foot - or othermen like Bruthen Munji?

(7) Ask Captain about marirne Bek.

(8) What is the meaning of Koyung-bortGardniers Ck.

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(9) Does William know the Kurnai call the bullroarer - shew him a [?].

Who is Miman-gurkAsk [crossed out - major] Captain about [Jalathi?], muthi-muthi Wathi wathi, Kuramin - are Wembaio [helping?]to one of men - which?

Then boundaries:-(11) Did the Ja-jau have the bŭrbŭng?If not what?

Last edit 2 months ago by Christine
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(12) Native name of Capt. Turnbull? [line drawn to] Ningūlabūlor nūng-qua-la-vol?meaning?which were the boundaries of theKūrnŭng willum tribe? of which hewas the head man. were they woewurŭng?native name of Benbow De Vilierssee (19)meaning of Yalūkūt-wilum(13) What was the tribe calledat [coast or at St Kilda - the Yalūkūt-wilum - were they Būnoorong?[yes sea ante-about and???]

(14) Were the gal-gal-ballukparrt of the Jajauwurung?

(15) what was the native nameof their ngŭrŭngaetaKing Bobbby?Native name of Malcom of theKri-balluk - in [???]

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(16) Do they know the Bangerang or Daujerang?half Kulin - Bunjil and Waang

(17) Have & [???][???] for Echucado if [???]

(18) Who was Bilibilery's fatherwho was of being [????]

Last edit 2 months ago by Christine

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it.Two other fellows JŭrtJŭrtThara - got some firewhen Wang threw it atthem and burnt all thecountry, and burnt Wangalso. B. [??] [??]this - + gathered peoplefrom the Goulburn -All the Kangaroos in a line t prevent the firego past them.[The Emus - crossed out]The fire was stopped at

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some high cliffs whereB. [??] near [??]at Charlton Bram Bran galnext to Jajarwrongwas like Bunjil

Gamulet

[??] [??] [?Krokich?]murantmoiwillukwang[?batyangal?]jallan

Last edit 4 months ago by ALourie

tip70-10-24-3 Taplin to Fison and Smithsonian Schedule

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[Table]

Description of Relationship. Native Term. Translation.

57 My brother's son F * Umbari, Mbari,58 [ditto] [ditto] son's wife [ditto] * Maiyarare59 [ditto] [ditto] daughter [ditto] * Mbari60 [ditto] [ditto] daughter's husband [ditto] * Yullundi, my relation in law61 [ditto] [ditto] grandson [ditto] * Ngaityeri62 [ditto] [ditto] granddaughter [ditto] ngaityeri63 [ditto] [ditto] great grandson [ditto] 64 [ditto] [ditto] great granddaughter [ditto] 65 [ditto] father's brother's son (Tongan characteristic) M * Gelanowe or Tarte as the brother was older or younger than my father66 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F [ditto] [ditto]67 [ditto] [ditto]son's wife M * ngulbowalle68 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * [ditto]69 [ditto] [ditto] daughter M ✓ Maranowe or Tarte as the case may be70 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F [ditto] 71 [ditto] [ditto] daughter's husband M * Rongi my brother in law72 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * [ditto]73 [ditto] [ditto] son's son M * Maiyarari74 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * Maiyarari75 [ditto] [ditto] daughter M * Maiyarari76 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * Maiyarari77 [ditto] [ditto] daughter's son M * Nanghare78 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * Nanghare

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[table]

Description of relationship. Native Term. Trnaslation.

79 My father's brother's daughter's daughter M * Nanghare80 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * Nanghare81 [ditto] [ditto] great grand son M82 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F83 [ditto] [ditto] great grand daughter M84 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F85 [ditto] [ditto] great great grand son86 [ditto] [ditto] gt. gt. grand daughter87 [ditto] sister's son M * Nguyanowe my cousin88 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * Nguyanowe my cousin89 [ditto] [ditto] son's wife M * Multhari90 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F91 [ditto] [ditto] daughter M * Nguyanowe my cousin92 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F93 [ditto] [ditto] daughter's husband M * Ronggi my relation in law94 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F95 [ditto] [ditto] son's son M96 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F97 [ditto] [ditto] son's daughter M98 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F99 [ditto] [ditto] daughter's son M100 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F

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[table]

Description of Relationship. Native Term. Translation.

101 My father's sister's daughter's daughter M102 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F103 [ditto] [ditto] great grandson104 [ditto] [ditto] great granddaughter105 [ditto] [ditto] gt. gt. grandson106 [ditto] [ditto] gt. gt. granddaughter107 [ditto] mother's sister's son M * Gelanowe or Tarte108 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * [ditto] [ditto] 109 [ditto] [ditto] son's wife M * Ngulbowalle my relation in law110 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * [ditto] 111 [ditto] [ditto] daughter M * Maranowe or Tarte112 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * [ditto]113 [ditto] [ditto] daughter's husband M * Ronggi Brother in law114 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * [ditto] 115 [ditto] [ditto] son's son M * Waiyatte116 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * [ditto]117 [ditto] [ditto] son's daughter M * Mbari118 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * [ditto]119 [ditto] [ditto] daughter's son M * Nanghare120 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * [ditto]121 [ditto] [ditto] daughter's daughter M * Nanghare122 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * [ditto]

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[table]

Description of Relationship. Native Term. Translation.

188 My wife's mother * Karingi 189 [ditto] grandmother 190 [ditto] son-in-law M * Yullundi191 [ditto] [ditto] F192 [ditto] daughter-in-law M * Maiyarare193 [ditto] [ditto] F194 [ditto] stepfather * Nanghy my father195 [ditto] stepmother * Nainkawa my mother196 [ditto] stepson 197 [ditto] stepdaughter198 [ditto] adopted son199 [ditto] adopted daughter200 [ditto] half-brother201 [ditto] half-sister202 Two fathers-in-law to each other * Gelanar brothers203 Two mothers-in-law [ditto] * Maranar sisters204 My brother-in-law - husband's brother * Ngulbowalle205 [ditto] [ditto] sister's husband M * Ronggi206 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F Ronggi207 [ditto] [ditto] wife's sister's husband * Nganwiruli208 [ditto] [ditto] wife's brother Ronggi209 [ditto] [ditto] husband's sister's husband * Gelanowe my brother

Last edit over 1 year ago by ALourie

hw0161 Bennett to Howitt 27/05/1880

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Gnutchen-najan a BatBittoo-gnung A Rat

BirdsBirrebine An EmuGooyoor A Native companionWombil A TurkeyMeroong An EagleGooraree-gung A HeronWarcolin A CrowGooroom-boocung A MagpiePoodhoom-barng A Black duckGur-rur-gur-gur A HawkCubber-ter-rung A Butcher birdGnoul A White CockatooNhee-nyah A Black CockatooMither-rither-rit A Spur winged ploverMooribe nurung-gul A RobinGoorie-gang A LarkBal-lingur A Lyre birdJinnoo jinnoot A GoatsuckerGoonner-jirry-jirrit A Fly catcherGoollie goollit A Parrot (crimson lory)Dhah-ber-up An OwlGoonum-ber-be-rung A QuailCoocoo-burrah A Laughing jackass

ReptilesGooroo-cul A IguanaJijoo-cung A SnakeGnoolook barn A TortoiseJirry-go-rat A FrogJin-noon-nun-gun A small glossy lizardJirra-brang-gun A Jew lizard

Last edit about 1 year ago by ALourie

hw0163 Notes on the Maneroo or Ngarigo

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Jagged Spear- GerahnbardeeBoomerang-War.rung.enShield- ArsunuelClub- Goodj-erungBread- Dthung.ungMeat Flesh- CheekA Woman-BallaruA Boy- BroorhulA Girl- Maa-loon-gaanWhite Man- MoomoogaugHead- Cad-a-gongFace- GundoreNose- NorMouth-Dha- or - MoordingeeTeeth- YayraWhiskers- YarungMoustache- MomdaringEar- Bin-ni-yarriHair- Ee-rongEyes- MobbarahArms- WayreBody- GhoongLegs- Sharah

Last edit about 1 year ago by Kurnai
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Hunter River language N.S.W.sun "Eera" - Moon. "Huon"Evening star "Gedalong"Southern pointers (stars) "Dindemar"Large red star ..? Mercury or Sirius"Gabrigan"Water - "Caleen" Fire. "ween"River - "Billah" - Earth. "Daggon"Sky. "Yurong" - Kangaroo "Womboyn"Opossum. "willi" - Bandicoot "Goo-rung"

Wallaby "Boileon"Rongtail Opossum "Jindi"Water rat "Dunjindi"Platypus - "Belatherung"Porcupine "Wandialeo"Native Bear "Goodah"

Last edit about 1 year ago by J Gibson

hw0404 Notes on Kurnai 150 pages

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7The tribes adjoining the Kurnai

Long Harry + McKay say:-The blackfellows over the mountain towardGoulburn we called Ngūr-au-it; thosetowards Melbourne To-tūr-ŭng ([?lū-rūng?])(Black snake) because they were alwayspoking about to kill us; those of Omeoand Maneroo Brajerak, those ofTwofold Bay War-al and those the otherside the Snowy River who werealmost Kŭrnai - Bidwelli.Biduéli?

Ball as a messageCharly Alexander says that among the Krauatanthe Ball - Tootajeraua was sent as atoken for friendship

Note that Old Williamsaid the sameof Woiworŭng

Last edit 2 months ago by ALourie

hw0419 Wotjobaluk Notes, Songs, Maps etc

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3at the jaine (jeru of Wotjo) [wh- crossed out] one man saysfor instance "I want a girl for my boy" - some onesays I will give my girl and you can give hissister to my boy. The matter is then discussed.

"Girl's father says to youth I have promised my girlto you. The youth's father says to the former if you like to have my boyfor your [girl - crossed out] daughter by and bye - I have his sister growing up, canmarry her brother." - This being settled the boy with a mussel shell cuts off some of the girl's hair whichhe gives to his mother who keeps it carefully in a smallnet bag. When married the girl takes it back to herfather and mother to keep. If the girl ran off with someman, the youth will put the hair with some black snakes fat orsomething of the kind and tie them up with some guliwillsand roast [the bo- crossed out]it before his fire when no one is aboutBy and bye he can hear the voice of her gulkin gulkin (spirit)complaining.Then he puts it away up in the bark forming his campwhere he can see it. In the night he sees her gulkin gulkinsneaking about trying to get the guliwill away.

Before boys whiskers come and before he is quite grown uphe is taken by his guritch (sisters husband) to his camp. Thenhe rubs him with red ochre and takes care of him. When hegoes out hunting or travelling he carries the boy when tired andhe sounds the bull roarer (mānunga) to make the boy strongand he sings this song continually:

pata manunga jirarungawait a while don't touch it growing up

This song also makes the two front top teeth easily removedwhen the boy is being initiated. While the song is being sung thebarn-būngal (medicine man) puts a pointed stick between theteeth to loosen them. If any blood comes from the gums eithernow or when the teeth are knocked out it mustnot be spit out - or let flow down his breast [else h -crossed out] buthe must swallow it, otherwise his legs will becomecrooked and he would become lame.

This was done by the Jajawrong and also by thetribes on the Murray

When the boy has grown so [?much?] older so that his beardhas come his gurech + the old men take him away to be made a man.He is laid down on the ground and all the hair from his faceand his pubes [are - crossed out] is plucked out. If this comes out easy and [anil - crossed out] without blood comingthey say "he is a good young man" and rub him with red ochreand after his two top front teeth are knocked out - he goes only with hisgurech + the old men. This is called pūrki-worruk. For a timehe is only rubbed with red ochre and remains quite naked, but after atime his oldest gureich brings him a possum rug.The other one is said to have been too much with the womenand is called a bad young man, is painted white from the waist over the head downthe back to the waist and wears a brandy yep in front + behind of possum skin strands.He is called Liba-auk.

[written in left side margin]The ganichceremony

Last edit 4 months ago by ALourie
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4[chart](1) M Barim +(1) F Mim ①

(3) M Tenamet-jaurlich(4) F Sera nim

(5) major(6) wife

no child

(1) This man belonged to a place calledMarr (near St Arnaud). He went tothe Wotjo country at Pine Plains nearYellamjip. He claimed a wife [then - crossed out][who was at Lake Coorong - crossed out] from that place who wasGanutch.[(2) - crossed out] Their son Major's father Tenamet-jaurlichwho claimed his country at St Arnaud [at - crossed out]also claimed as his country Pine PlainsHis wife was [a Laitchi- Laitchi - crossed out] from[and was a Kilpara - crossed out] Pine Plains.[Then -crossed out] and took her mother's clan nameKilpara. Her mother was of the Laitchi-laitchi tribe at Kulkyne.

Major (5) is [Bunjil - crossed out] Wrappel after his father, [or speaking - crossed out] and Wrappel(Eagle hawk) is the same as Bunjil. But after his mother heis Kilpara when he goes to the Murray tribes. Hispaternal grandmother was gamulet and as to her tribe descentruns in the female line [??] where is [??] tribe is Gamutch.He takes his country as a Jajauworung from his father + grandfather; he alsohas Pine Plains after his father who lived there, and also from his grandfatherwhose wife was from that place. He also claims the country where his father wasburied. Thus the country of which he was "free" is bounded in thewest by Yanambrak creek, on the north from Lake Tyrrel to Pine plainsnear Yellamjip, South to Murtoa (where his father was buried) and East toto St Arnaud.

(7) the child of Major (had he one) would he says take his namefrom his mother a Woring class from Alexandra - but ?

Major could not get a wife at Pine plains because it wasthere his mother came from - and his "mother's blood" would be too near to himin the people there. He would have to go to some place where there were no people "too near to him". Horsham would do because he had friendsthere who would find him a wife.

yaur= flesh = totem = class

M Nga-pung brother + mother - brotherF Kukuk sister + sister sister

F Lera-nim ngalŭk daughter

Major - māp-gurk daughter

cannot marry [māp-gurk - crossed out] ngaluk (daughter of [mo gra - crossed out] mother'sbrother) nor his daughter - māp-gurk-cannot marry any one in this line of descent as faras could be traced. Read "forbidden degree" of Wotjoballuk([?Bob ?Nephew?]) Major said "cannot marry those"Therefore I amount to this to obtain a wife a man must be [??] to some one of the distant intermarryinglocalities - where there is some woman who is not of the "Yaur" ofthe intended husband. He must therefore marry some [one -crossed out] woman ofthe opposite class from some distant locality who is not near to him.

This matter would require consideration and therefore it is thatgreat meeting of tribes the men discussed [?preferred?] marriages.

[written in the left side margin]+= Paternal grandfather=① paternal grand mother

ngapung - [father - crossed out] mother's fatherkukun = mother's mother

Major's mother

Last edit about 2 months ago by ALourie
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5Notes on tribes River Murray +c

Victorian side(1) in the [Loddon - crossed out] plains from Mt Hope to the Murray the - B + WWamba-wamba - also had at least the lower part of [?Bully?] ck(2) in Loddon up to Boort the Bureppa-bureppa - whojoin the Jajauwrong at Boort- B + W(3) Reedy lake - Bura-bura - M + K(4) Swan Hill to Pyangil - Wati-wati - M + K(5) Pyangil to Euston - Weike-weiki - M + K(6) Euston to Kulkyne - Leichi-leichi - M + K(7) Kulkyne to Wentworth - grangema M + K(8) Wentworth to Goolwa - Yakoma in M + Kboth side of the Murray - M + K

N.S.W. side(1) From Moulamein down to Balranald with Murrayfor south boundary the Barabba BarabbaNote the Barabba - barabba are said to be very nearly the sameas the Bureppa-bureppa - in the Loddon River(2) The Mutti-mutti from Balranald to Euston(3) The Tatathi from Euston to Wentworth

Notes The Boora-boor and the Watti-watti boundaryout [??] near the Tyrell creek + Lake Tyrell[of the - crossed out] A line drawn from [the P - crossed out] Lake Tyrrel to Yellamjipneatly went of Lake Tyrel [and - crossed out] defines the boundary south of the Laichi-laichi

The Boundaries of the Jajoworung were approximatelythe following[N N creswick Boort - crossed out] Boort, Watchem, WatchemBy the Avoca [River + ?? - crossed out] River to Redbank - thento Natty Yallock, Creswick, Daylesford, Castlemaine[Jim Crow - crossed out] Maldon - BoortThree of the lesser divisions of the tribe were:(1) Headquarters at St Arnaud (Warr)

Last edit about 2 months ago by ALourie

hw0418 Howitt Notes on Wotjobaluk

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3

Neri = steep bank = waang Kilmore - down to Seymoursome Bunjil - on the Goulburn

[map showing location of communities]

[written under map]the Jajaurung countrycan be defined as extending N + Sfrom Daylesford to Boortand [??] [??] East + W.

Jajorung country - Donaldto [?Castlema?] - Maryborough- Maldon- Eddington- Dunolly[??]Bialiba, Yallong - St Arnaud, Swan Water, Cope Cope, BangerangCorak township, Morton plains, Naraport, Morlburt?Wimbutchup, Warraknabial, Sheephill, Minyip,[Kiew-crossed out] Kiewr, Murtoa.

[??] had 7 mobs-

(1) Wangari-bŭrk creek - stringy bark tree - Jim CrowCastlemaine-[?Maldon?] - Eddington - Dunolly- BealbaAvoca forest - Yau-ung - St arnaud warr - Cope CopeGuthrie's place, Avoca plain - Marano, [cres - crossed out]Tarragton, Navarre, Berke-yurn, Natty yallock(2) Būrŭm-balluk - white gum S. aphy peoplepart of (1) - Between Brimbank + Natti yalluk(3) Bial-balluk - redgum people - Bialiba(4) gal-gal-balluk Brimbank[??] of River(5) Derak-balluk - Avoca forest(6) Wait-kundi-uk Wattle treeWareknabealBriemLakeCorong(7)

Last edit 4 months ago by ALourie
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7

[?cont?] with p 48 "he gave +c p 49down to the first 7

[written sideways on page]

(1) M Kilpara-Parem-(2) F. Kilpiri - [Bap Kukuk - crossed out] Kukuk

(3) M Mudnara - Jena-met-jarolitch(4) F. Kilpara - ≠ Lera+nin

Major - Bunjil

(1) + (3) belonged to St Arnaud (2) from [Lake Coorong Kukyne- Leitchi-Leitchi - crossed out] Kulkyn- Leitchi Leitchi(4) Pine Plain - Werkaia

[written sideways on second half of page]Wamba Wamba - from Mt Hope down to the Murray R+ lower part at least of Bullock creek also up Loddon to Boort above that Jajorung

the Ware-yallum- [?black?] [?lived?] going toto the Bangerang

Major = Bunjil = Kilpara at the Tata thi -Richard = wang= MukmunBilly Wambat = Wang = (Wurunjeri)Ned + [Tome?] - belong to Pine plain - the other sideof Lake Hindmarsh - Wotjobalaiuk-gamitch= waaJohn [?Padisin?] - Kilpara like his mother - [bet-crossed out] Wamba-Wambanear Reedy LakeDick Rowan - brother of John [?Padisin?]

Last edit 2 months ago by ALourie
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8

3Major's father's father gave him his "animal"name (ngaur) mindai= a very venomous snake

Krokitch-wartwut-[?claim?]mindaiwurki-bungomoiwill-poison snakepangal diamond snakejarrocha - poison snaketei-korn - snakeLük - small snakeWūrup - cockatoo parrotWillek willek a large bird with red breastMorukirt - rosellaKerangoran - parrot like RosellaKallelak bird with red undereach wing - called Major Mitchell

At the Jain matters are discussed - at a firemade there. For instance if a man he hadapproached a woman who is too near Yauarinto him. Like bringing him before them for an offence.

Jajaurong call the Jain Ūlambara

See the notebook for theirmortuary arrangements

Last edit 4 months ago by ALourie

hw0413 Questions for John Connolly including notes on Jajaurung

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2

Last edit 4 months ago by ALourie

hw0434, O'Rourke to Howitt undated

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3

No 1Man marrinWoman cow wambohead cud e thong hair of head yea-rongEye mob baranose noretongue dhullinEar dun-nahhand murrongahthumb nath gongcoFoot ginahMy foot nambo ginahthy foot indigee ginahhis foot gimmokong ginahblood Currobahbone gonochcosun mom mage (or) mom-ma-geemoon [Cobat - crossed out] cob-batangfire wathawater nahjongground (soil) theyur

Last edit 11 months ago by ALourie

hw0435, O'Rourke to Howitt 30 May 1881

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5

No 1This is family of (10) 6 boys + 4 girlsNo 1 is the Eldest brother + the others down to No 6No 1 calls N2 Koo Kong niambaNo 1 call N3 Kookong DreallNo 1 calls No 4 Kookong norlong N 1 calls N5 badiong (or) Bad-i-ongN1 calls N6 nummong muthaNo 6 calls N1 gegong bulgarabongNo 6 calls N2 gegong niambaNo 6 calls No 3 gegong dreallNo 6 calls N 4 geogon morongNo 6 calls N5 gegong badiong The Eldest Sister[No1 aummong - crossed out]Nos 2 3 + 4 calls N1 Ammunong AreowangN1 calls N2 Aummong aralN1 calls N3 gullonN1 calls N4 narong gullonNo 4 calls N1 Aummong areowangN4 calls No2 AummongNo 4 calls N3 Dreall

[written in right side margin] A child speaking of the one older than him self will call him gegong and what ever the other may be. And one speaking of one younger than him self will call him kaokang and what other name he may have

Last edit 11 months ago by ALourie
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6

No. 2The Father a+ Mother namesFather [bop - crossed out] BobpongMother NahgongThe grand mother kowping the Fathersmotherthe Grand mother on the mothers side is naunThe Father's brother mangong his wife nam wungThe mother's brother nambong his wife gur rong

Last edit 3 months ago by ALourie

hw0391 Notes by Howitt on Kulin from Barak

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21

13It is significant in all thesestories – no sign is visible of the victim having been cut open. It is said "they shut him up again”. There can be no doubt that these stories refer to “nightmare” – although there can be perhaps as little doubt also that many a one has fallen a victim to this practice in actual reality.

William said he remembered an old man being “caught” in the manner described (and dying in consequence) — by the Jajowrong Blacks. Further that the old man went as far as Lilydale from [where - crossed out] the scene of the event (his dream?) and then died.

When a man died and there was no Wirirap present to tell them who had killed him – his friends dug a grave which they carefully swept out and examined for a small hole going downwards. A small stick put down it showed the direction, and in that direction the male relatives went until they met some man – whom they killed him to avenge the dead.

William gave this illustration: —“When they had covered up the body in the grave the old men would say— now go on and when you have killed a man – do not plant him – but lay him out on a log so that people can see him and know better another time than to kill one of our men” - then the killed man's friends when they find him will be very much frightened”.

[written in left side margin]

grave = Tham-bŭr

Last edit 3 months ago by ALourie
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9to the exclusion of the younger men. These elder men are those who exercise authority in the tribe. They are the repositories and expounders of ancestral custom and they are supposed the [??]not only of wisdom but also of secret and deadly [?power?] of sorcery by which they can destroy theirenemies. Their dicta are therefore [cl - crossed out]charged with authority and [with - crossed out] they have the means of making that authority obeyed. It is universally true that man as an individual or as a classwill [ha - crossed out] if he have the power, appropriate to himself privileges and advantages to the exclusion of others. All history and experience is full of instances. This is precisely that which the elder men of such tribes [have done - crossed out] do when they monopolize the women to the exclusion of their fellow clans men.The perpetuation of this monopoly is ensured by those interested in it having [dau - crossed out] sisters or daughters to exchange with each other for wives. Such a practice would in itself tend to bring about [indur - crossed out] the Pairing Family as we see it here. Namely the monopoly by one man of one or more women. The practices of capture and elopement would [natu -crossed out] easily and naturally fall into the path thus struck out and individual marriage would result. Exceptional case such as that of the Kurnaiwould accelerate the process and confirm the habit. This explanation of the ongoing of Individual marriage is I submitentirely in accordance with [ex - crossed out] what we know ofthe Australian aborigines, it is in accordance with probability and render unneccessary such [??]conclusions that "capture and capture along could +c)

Last edit 2 months ago by ALourie
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