Howitt and Fison Papers

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Search for Jajaurong* Jajowerong* Jajawrung* Jajauwurong* Jajowrong* Jajawrong* Jajaurung* Jajorung* Jajarwrong* Jajauwrung* Jajowerung* Jajowerūng* jajauworung* "Jaj owurrong" Ja-jow-er-ong* Jajoworong* Ja-jau-rong* Jajawerrung* jajaurung* Jajau* Daujerang* Jajau'rung* Jajauworung* Jajauwrong* Jajoworung*

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Barter

Yuin

At the end of the Bunan, when the boys have goneoff themselves and before the different lots of peoplesreturn to their own localities, a kind of marketwas held, in some clear space near the camp whenthe people laid out the things they had brought with them.A man would say "share such and such things" another would bargain for them. A complete setis one ngulia (belt of possum fur [?]) four Burrian (kilt)one gumbrum and one complete set of Kubbutguruthat is corroboree things. It was the rule that a completeset went together. Weapons might be given in exchange.A complete set of weapons was the fighting boomerang[(.........)?] Warangun, ten grass treeand jagged wood pointed spears (Bembaia) -for club fighting (Millidu), one [....] club [(gud-ju-rung)or (Bundi) and one spear thrower (wommera).The women also enjoyed in this trade exchangingpossum rugs, bags - yam sticks (tuali) [...] -[......]

Last edit about 1 year ago by J Gibson

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that the [Dade?]the sky like a vault [rests?]is clear. The [Malthe-malthu?] [legend?] p -) sectsthe [Mirra muira?] -, having killed a kangaroo stretched out its skin as the [vault?] of the sky, having first [pinned?] the edges in the ground, and having found the [?] [?] satisfied and a new [?] when came after us can walk about without [?].

Chapter 8 Beliefs--------------------------$1. The Universe, The earth, sky, sun, moon, stars [xct?] $2 The human spirit, ghost [xct?]$3 The whiteman as a ghost$4 Burial practices$5 The sky-country,it's inhabitants [xct?] (a) ghosts (b) supernatural beings$6 The tribal All-father[Line crossed out]--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------S1 The Universe--------------------------There seems to be a widespread belief that the earth is a flat surface, surmounted by the solid vault of the sky.[1 1/2 lines crossed out]The [Ūri-ūlū?] [Good?] (?) tells him after the holding of the [Wilyarū?] ceremony they went on their wanderings, and finally what may briefly termed abeyond the mountains passed through what may briefly termed a "hard darkness" into another country, whence looking back they recognised what they had passed through was the edge of the sky. The [Kapiri?] legend (p - ) shows this (Here other evidence from [?] [?]).

Left hand margin and to be inserted here: the earth is supportedthe [?] [nature?] the [maia nusea?] - ?having [se?] its bounds to the north which is wandering (There [A djaitum?] [?]

A [Wotjoballuk?] legend runs that at first the sky rested on the earth and prevented the sun from moving, until [Gorŭk?], the magpie ( ), propped it up with a long stick, so that the sun could move and so since then she(2) has gone round and round.

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that the earth is flat, and the [Jajaurung?] that the earth is flat and was in darkness until the sun was made by [Pupperinbuk?], who was one of the race who inhabited the earth at that time, and whom they called the [Nurrumbung-utt?] [?] 2. (see p ).

The [Worworŭng?] also believe ["that the flat earth" to be inserted here]that the sky was propped up with poles where it rested on the mountains in the north-east.

Before the "whitemen came to Melbourne", a message was passed from tribe to tribe, that the props were becoming rotten and that unless tomahawks were at once sent up to cut new ones the sky would fall, and [burat?] and all the people would be drowned. (4)

This same belief is mentioned by Buckley/William Buckley, but in a different form, namely that the earth was supported by props, which were in the "charge of a man who lived at the end of the earth" (5).

A similar message which the [wimera?], having been passed down the River Murray, from tribe to tribe. It was [?] the props which suppor-ted the earth were rotten and unless tomahawks were sent, to cut fresh ones, the earth would fall down and every one would be killed (4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------------(I) The life and adventures of William Buckley by John MorganHobart 1852

(2) The [?] a [wimare?] - fee for. (3) [?] p 201 (4) [?](5) J Shaw

Last edit 10 months ago by Christine

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Leaur-gura -balluknow the mountain where Parkers Stationwas. name ginojaugWhen CampseNot many there was Bunjil.at Daylesford all the [??] when harmfulare all ? [Kalk Kalk crossed out] (with gal gal under) Bullung- all wang.Leaur gura tallung have spears [??] [woiwrung?]only with a [??][??] Jajawrung

Last edit over 1 year ago by CoreyTheatre

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husband nangūrūng husbands broth. nangūrūng husband sist husband Dangan or dedjetBrothers wife birmbangF. brother wife ūmŭrkwife - birmbang or ūmŭrkwife sister birmbangwife sister husband Kairep (friend)F Sist husband nangūrūng F Brothers wife YumŭrkM wifes brother goreitch M sister's Husband [Fourwords crossed out]

M wae- M wee F wei_______ __________F Bunjil F Bunjil M Bunjil

goureith

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Notes on the aborigines of Yarra tribe

Kūlin - Westernport Kūlin down toTarwin - both sideBū nū rūng.go to Geelong - Bacchus Marsh - Mt MacedonKilmore, Benalla, WangarattaBuffalo River __________________William's tribe BunyipAll [?Westernport?] - Mount MacedonKilmore, Heidelberg.Plenty River, Kangaroo Ground.1 about Kew - Ūrŭndjeri willŭm2 [Westernport - crossed out] Cranbourne - Būlūk-willŭm3 Dandenong - Ngairāk-willŭm[Cannot read word]4. Mordiallok - Būnwūrŭng

Last edit 3 months ago by ALourie

tip70-10-24-3 Taplin to Fison and Smithsonian Schedule

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[Table]

Description of Relationship. Native Term. Translation.

57 My brother's son F * Umbari, Mbari,58 [ditto] [ditto] son's wife [ditto] * Maiyarare59 [ditto] [ditto] daughter [ditto] * Mbari60 [ditto] [ditto] daughter's husband [ditto] * Yullundi, my relation in law61 [ditto] [ditto] grandson [ditto] * Ngaityeri62 [ditto] [ditto] granddaughter [ditto] ngaityeri63 [ditto] [ditto] great grandson [ditto] 64 [ditto] [ditto] great granddaughter [ditto] 65 [ditto] father's brother's son (Tongan characteristic) M * Gelanowe or Tarte as the brother was older or younger than my father66 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F [ditto] [ditto]67 [ditto] [ditto]son's wife M * ngulbowalle68 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * [ditto]69 [ditto] [ditto] daughter M ✓ Maranowe or Tarte as the case may be70 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F [ditto] 71 [ditto] [ditto] daughter's husband M * Rongi my brother in law72 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * [ditto]73 [ditto] [ditto] son's son M * Maiyarari74 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * Maiyarari75 [ditto] [ditto] daughter M * Maiyarari76 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * Maiyarari77 [ditto] [ditto] daughter's son M * Nanghare78 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * Nanghare

Last edit over 1 year ago by ALourie
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[table]

Description of relationship. Native Term. Trnaslation.

79 My father's brother's daughter's daughter M * Nanghare80 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * Nanghare81 [ditto] [ditto] great grand son M82 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F83 [ditto] [ditto] great grand daughter M84 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F85 [ditto] [ditto] great great grand son86 [ditto] [ditto] gt. gt. grand daughter87 [ditto] sister's son M * Nguyanowe my cousin88 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * Nguyanowe my cousin89 [ditto] [ditto] son's wife M * Multhari90 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F91 [ditto] [ditto] daughter M * Nguyanowe my cousin92 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F93 [ditto] [ditto] daughter's husband M * Ronggi my relation in law94 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F95 [ditto] [ditto] son's son M96 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F97 [ditto] [ditto] son's daughter M98 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F99 [ditto] [ditto] daughter's son M100 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F

Last edit over 1 year ago by ALourie
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[table]

Description of Relationship. Native Term. Translation.

101 My father's sister's daughter's daughter M102 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F103 [ditto] [ditto] great grandson104 [ditto] [ditto] great granddaughter105 [ditto] [ditto] gt. gt. grandson106 [ditto] [ditto] gt. gt. granddaughter107 [ditto] mother's sister's son M * Gelanowe or Tarte108 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * [ditto] [ditto] 109 [ditto] [ditto] son's wife M * Ngulbowalle my relation in law110 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * [ditto] 111 [ditto] [ditto] daughter M * Maranowe or Tarte112 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * [ditto]113 [ditto] [ditto] daughter's husband M * Ronggi Brother in law114 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * [ditto] 115 [ditto] [ditto] son's son M * Waiyatte116 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * [ditto]117 [ditto] [ditto] son's daughter M * Mbari118 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * [ditto]119 [ditto] [ditto] daughter's son M * Nanghare120 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * [ditto]121 [ditto] [ditto] daughter's daughter M * Nanghare122 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F * [ditto]

Last edit over 1 year ago by ALourie
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[table]

Description of Relationship. Native Term. Translation.

188 My wife's mother * Karingi 189 [ditto] grandmother 190 [ditto] son-in-law M * Yullundi191 [ditto] [ditto] F192 [ditto] daughter-in-law M * Maiyarare193 [ditto] [ditto] F194 [ditto] stepfather * Nanghy my father195 [ditto] stepmother * Nainkawa my mother196 [ditto] stepson 197 [ditto] stepdaughter198 [ditto] adopted son199 [ditto] adopted daughter200 [ditto] half-brother201 [ditto] half-sister202 Two fathers-in-law to each other * Gelanar brothers203 Two mothers-in-law [ditto] * Maranar sisters204 My brother-in-law - husband's brother * Ngulbowalle205 [ditto] [ditto] sister's husband M * Ronggi206 [ditto] [ditto] [ditto] F Ronggi207 [ditto] [ditto] wife's sister's husband * Nganwiruli208 [ditto] [ditto] wife's brother Ronggi209 [ditto] [ditto] husband's sister's husband * Gelanowe my brother

Last edit over 1 year ago by ALourie

hw0161 Bennett to Howitt 27/05/1880

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Gnutchen-najan a BatBittoo-gnung A Rat

BirdsBirrebine An EmuGooyoor A Native companionWombil A TurkeyMeroong An EagleGooraree-gung A HeronWarcolin A CrowGooroom-boocung A MagpiePoodhoom-barng A Black duckGur-rur-gur-gur A HawkCubber-ter-rung A Butcher birdGnoul A White CockatooNhee-nyah A Black CockatooMither-rither-rit A Spur winged ploverMooribe nurung-gul A RobinGoorie-gang A LarkBal-lingur A Lyre birdJinnoo jinnoot A GoatsuckerGoonner-jirry-jirrit A Fly catcherGoollie goollit A Parrot (crimson lory)Dhah-ber-up An OwlGoonum-ber-be-rung A QuailCoocoo-burrah A Laughing jackass

ReptilesGooroo-cul A IguanaJijoo-cung A SnakeGnoolook barn A TortoiseJirry-go-rat A FrogJin-noon-nun-gun A small glossy lizardJirra-brang-gun A Jew lizard

Last edit about 1 year ago by ALourie

hw0163 Notes on the Maneroo or Ngarigo

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Jagged Spear- GerahnbardeeBoomerang-War.rung.enShield- ArsunuelClub- Goodj-erungBread- Dthung.ungMeat Flesh- CheekA Woman-BallaruA Boy- BroorhulA Girl- Maa-loon-gaanWhite Man- MoomoogaugHead- Cad-a-gongFace- GundoreNose- NorMouth-Dha- or - MoordingeeTeeth- YayraWhiskers- YarungMoustache- MomdaringEar- Bin-ni-yarriHair- Ee-rongEyes- MobbarahArms- WayreBody- GhoongLegs- Sharah

Last edit about 1 year ago by Kurnai
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Hunter River language N.S.W.sun "Eera" - Moon. "Huon"Evening star "Gedalong"Southern pointers (stars) "Dindemar"Large red star ..? Mercury or Sirius"Gabrigan"Water - "Caleen" Fire. "ween"River - "Billah" - Earth. "Daggon"Sky. "Yurong" - Kangaroo "Womboyn"Opossum. "willi" - Bandicoot "Goo-rung"

Wallaby "Boileon"Rongtail Opossum "Jindi"Water rat "Dunjindi"Platypus - "Belatherung"Porcupine "Wandialeo"Native Bear "Goodah"

Last edit about 1 year ago by J Gibson

hw0404 Notes on Kurnai 150 pages

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7The tribes adjoining the Kurnai

Long Harry + McKay say:-The blackfellows over the mountain towardGoulburn we called Ngūr-au-it; thosetowards Melbourne To-tūr-ŭng ([?lū-rūng?])(Black snake) because they were alwayspoking about to kill us; those of Omeoand Maneroo Brajerak, those ofTwofold Bay War-al and those the otherside the Snowy River who werealmost Kŭrnai - Bidwelli.Biduéli?

Ball as a messageCharly Alexander says that among the Krauatanthe Ball - Tootajeraua was sent as atoken for friendship

Note that Old Williamsaid the sameof Woiworŭng

Last edit 2 months ago by ALourie

hw0434, O'Rourke to Howitt undated

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No 1Man marrinWoman cow wambohead cud e thong hair of head yea-rongEye mob baranose noretongue dhullinEar dun-nahhand murrongahthumb nath gongcoFoot ginahMy foot nambo ginahthy foot indigee ginahhis foot gimmokong ginahblood Currobahbone gonochcosun mom mage (or) mom-ma-geemoon [Cobat - crossed out] cob-batangfire wathawater nahjongground (soil) theyur

Last edit 11 months ago by ALourie

hw0435, O'Rourke to Howitt 30 May 1881

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No 1This is family of (10) 6 boys + 4 girlsNo 1 is the Eldest brother + the others down to No 6No 1 calls N2 Koo Kong niambaNo 1 call N3 Kookong DreallNo 1 calls No 4 Kookong norlong N 1 calls N5 badiong (or) Bad-i-ongN1 calls N6 nummong muthaNo 6 calls N1 gegong bulgarabongNo 6 calls N2 gegong niambaNo 6 calls No 3 gegong dreallNo 6 calls N 4 geogon morongNo 6 calls N5 gegong badiong The Eldest Sister[No1 aummong - crossed out]Nos 2 3 + 4 calls N1 Ammunong AreowangN1 calls N2 Aummong aralN1 calls N3 gullonN1 calls N4 narong gullonNo 4 calls N1 Aummong areowangN4 calls No2 AummongNo 4 calls N3 Dreall

[written in right side margin] A child speaking of the one older than him self will call him gegong and what ever the other may be. And one speaking of one younger than him self will call him kaokang and what other name he may have

Last edit 11 months ago by ALourie
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No. 2The Father a+ Mother namesFather [bop - crossed out] BobpongMother NahgongThe grand mother kowping the Fathersmotherthe Grand mother on the mothers side is naunThe Father's brother mangong his wife nam wungThe mother's brother nambong his wife gur rong

Last edit 3 months ago by ALourie

hw0391 Notes by Howitt on Kulin from Barak

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9to the exclusion of the younger men. These elder men are those who exercise authority in the tribe. They are the repositories and expounders of ancestral custom and they are supposed the [??]not only of wisdom but also of secret and deadly [?power?] of sorcery by which they can destroy theirenemies. Their dicta are therefore [cl - crossed out]charged with authority and [with - crossed out] they have the means of making that authority obeyed. It is universally true that man as an individual or as a classwill [ha - crossed out] if he have the power, appropriate to himself privileges and advantages to the exclusion of others. All history and experience is full of instances. This is precisely that which the elder men of such tribes [have done - crossed out] do when they monopolize the women to the exclusion of their fellow clans men.The perpetuation of this monopoly is ensured by those interested in it having [dau - crossed out] sisters or daughters to exchange with each other for wives. Such a practice would in itself tend to bring about [indur - crossed out] the Pairing Family as we see it here. Namely the monopoly by one man of one or more women. The practices of capture and elopement would [natu -crossed out] easily and naturally fall into the path thus struck out and individual marriage would result. Exceptional case such as that of the Kurnaiwould accelerate the process and confirm the habit. This explanation of the ongoing of Individual marriage is I submitentirely in accordance with [ex - crossed out] what we know ofthe Australian aborigines, it is in accordance with probability and render unneccessary such [??]conclusions that "capture and capture along could +c)

Last edit 2 months ago by ALourie
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67The Ūurŭnjeri should be written Wūrŭnwhich is the River white gum = E. Viminalis.The Warin or Waring is the sea which extends all round from Geelong.The boundary between the Wŭdthau’rungWūdthauworung and the Woëworung was at the Werribee-yallŭk (river)The former went inland as far as the Anakies and further west to the Leigh River and their great meetings with the tribe from about Ballarat were held at Mt Emu (per Johnny Philips).

The Boon’orung Boonworung extended from the Saltwater River along the coast Eastward.

William Berak remembers [the - crosssed out] some of the Kulinfrom the Buffalo River coming to a great meeting near Melbourne. They were the Mogullum bitch tribe, and their Head man was called Kallakallap, who had great influence and was listened to.

He also some [sic] of the Theddora-mittung from beyond the country of the Mogullum-bitch, also came to a great meeting held before but at which Kallakalap was. They came as friends the Kulin of the Dandenong mountains (look these up).

Note This being the case the Kulin of the Dandenong mountains could only have come to know the Theddora-mittung by meeting them in the summer haunts in the mountains eg [at - crossed out] in the country between the head of the Yarra & the head of the Buffalo River, unless they met at some great meeting say in the country of the tribes about Mansfield.

The Redgum is called Bial by the Woeworung.Banksia integrifola – Kurnai (Brabra) BírrenWoëworung = Wūrait

Last edit 2 months ago by ALourie

hw0390 Notes by Howitt on the Kulin Nation

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The Kulin Tribe

References

Other tribe 68 & 72Wurundjeri – 67Boonorung - 67

Boundaries 67, 53-54, 59 and tribes of Kulin Nation - 11Mitialūn? 8 – 9 – 50 56. Death 10 – medicine men 10, The Bone 11. Kidney fat 12.Burial 62 13 – ghost – 141 Murup of animal 16 – Eaglehawk carries off child 18 – Messengers 56. Visitors 3.[?]Sex totems 41 18 – Bunjil legend 56 22 – Infanticide 22 – Bunjil went up 23 – World groups 23 – Burning the land 23 –Signal left at camp 24 – Blood feud 43 25 – Wūiberi’s song 30 – Dream of Kangaroo 31. 5Food prohibitions of novices 32 – Headman 5 33-34-35-38 39-55-56 Stealing tomahawk stone 36 – Tomahawk quarry 38Totems – stars 57 44 – Pleiades 45 – Stars 56 Mariné bek[?] 50 47 – Nose boring 49 – Waang & Bunjil sticks 50 – Country will one hand over[?] – 51 – Smoke Signals 52 – Jajaurong 53 – Thunder 55. Bull roarer 55Widows 55 - Languages 58 – clans ([...]) 58 – Exchange of food 59 - 60.Camping rules 66 Buckley 61. Wifes mother 61 – Six wives – one Headman 62.Ngamat – 62 - 63 The sun & moon 63 – aurora 64 – old people, care of 64, - Bunjil 64Bringing back the dead murup 65 The Wurūnjeri – 53. 59. 40. 1Border of Kulin & tribes having Krokitch & Ganitch at St Arnaud.Captain” – whose “mir” is Moiwilluk a [...]. “[D..]” who is Garilunka[?] […]Theddura mittung at great Kulin meeting 67Names of Redgum & Banksia 67.Names of places – 68 Jajauwong 54Bilbileri 36, 39Turnbull 34 34 A, 39Bebejern - 37 Bŭngerim 46 Malcolm – 39 The Kŭrnŭng-willum tribes – p 39. 37. 3, [...]_______________________Latrobe PapersCannibalism .p 1 - war implements -10 – Billibileri – 10 – Gippsland blacks 11Signal fire p 3Chiefs – 4. Old men 4. 5. [E..] men 9.[2 words illeg] 5. good feeling any[?] them[?] 5.Burial 5. Orphans 6. Marriage 6. Laws 6. Murder 7 […]alliance of tribes 7. would never die for[?] 8 Kidney fat 8Dances 8 – games 8 – Bunjil 11, Bunbeal[?] 11, [...] 11, Making of men -12The flood 13 – Wind 13 – Thunder 13 – Native bear 13 – Wombat 14D.. 15 – Murrina Koodung[?] 15 – Camps 15 – Fight between [Dan..] and Buninyong[?] blacks north of Melbourne 17 – […] of different tribes together 19.ceremony of Jenderrum 20 – of Murrum Jukkerook 22 ceremony of Tib-bib 23.

Last edit about 2 months ago by ALourie

hw0170 Port Jackson tribe notes

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Port JacksonCollinsNSW Engcoing the SunYen-na-dah the moonBir-rong A starMo-loo-mo-long The PleiadesWar-re-wull The Milky WayCa-ra-go-ro A cloudBoo-do-en-onggeneral nameCal-gal-le-on The MagellanieThe greater cloudsGnar-rang-al-le-onThe lesserTu-ru-ga A star fallingCo-ing bi-bo-ba Sun risingBour-ra the skyCo-ing-bur-re-goo-lah sun settingGam-mar-rooTar-re-ber-re DayGwe-yong fireCad-jee smokeGil-le A sparkPer-mul Earth

Last edit 8 months ago by ALourie
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3Jee-run A CowardCan-ning A caveMe-diong A soreYa-goo-na TodayBo-ra-ne YesterdayPar-ry-boo-go tomorrowMul-lin-ow ool in the morningJew-ni-be laughterBoo-roo-wang An islandGno-rang A placeE-rang A valleyboods a torch made of reedsMi-yal a strangerAr-runga a calmMoo-roo-bin woman's milkCa-bahn an eggYah-bun instrumental musicYoo-long or Clear ground forYoo-[?lamg?] public ceremoniesBood-jer-re GoodWeere weere badMurray greatGnar-rang smallCoo-rar-ra long

Last edit 8 months ago by ALourie
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6 Cad-el-ar NeckCad-el-ansNā-buns Breast or Nipple Yar-ri[?n?] beard De-war-ra hairBar-rons bellyGo-rook KneeDar-ra legMa-no-e footTammira handBerrille FingerCarrungan = NailBibbe — RibsBa - rongle — veinsPa-di-el — Flesh or leanBog-gay — FatTarrang —ArmO-nur — ElbowWyomano — ThumbDaragil-lie — ForefingerBarogallie — Middle or ring finger Mod-len gallie little finger

Last edit 8 months ago by Margaret T. Newman

hw0321 Gason to Howitt 12/2/1881

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1questionIs the Diereyie divided intosubtribes.From their own statement andfrom my own observation among sixyears living amongst them in their wildstate during which time I devotedall my spare time in acquiring theirtoungue and patiently awaiting mytime to be initiated into theirsecret ceremonies. Together withthe opportunity of continually visitingthe neighbouring tribes on the eastern coast of Lake Eyre, theEverard River, the lower partof the Diamantina + Herbert RiversIn all the tribes in the abovelocalties ("arrminie tribe""Ongkongooroo tribe" Wongurrap-una tribe" Urrapuna Tribe"also the Yandrawontha tribecooyanie tribe Yarrawaurka

Last edit 5 months ago by ALourie

hw0326 Gason to Howitt 1/9/1882

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Dieyerie . . . . . . .Aumanie \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \Yarawaurka ooooo Fandrawondtha oooMurdula - - - - -Wongurrapuna 0000Urapuna x x x x xCooyanie * * * * *Ongkongooroo 2 2 2 2 2

Last edit 5 months ago by ALourie

hw0327 Gason to Howitt

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8th"pinna" great litteral [sic] translationof Urapuna heard great heard distin-ctly heard without doubt.

7th Cooyanil from the Dieyerieword coo-oo-anil. I don't knowI am ignorant of the fact. I really do not know.

8th Tribe Ongkongooroo from theDieyerie words wonka sing oorooalways perpetually - continuousliteral translation "always singing"perpetually singing.

Please note the word "ooroo"by itself means "leg" but if aword terminates with "ooroo" thenit has quite a different meaning.

There is no doubt that theYandrawondtha Tribe does exten-d as far East as the FloodsCreek. My furtherest Eastern travelsonly extends as far as Lake Boolka.

Last edit 5 months ago by ALourie

tip70-10-33-3 Howitt to Fison 15/5/1873

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1 My Father - Mung-an, nittal2 [ditto] Mother - yuck-an, down[son - crossed out]3 [ditto] son - leet a nittal5 [ditto] elder Brother - turndee down (turndung (is) = brother)6 [ditto] younger Brother - bean buttung {or bramung, nittalung7 [ditto] elder Sister - lurndee down {or bramung down8 [ditto] younger sister - bowung down9 [ditto] father's brother - brebba mung-an, nittal10 [ditto] father's sister - mummung}or } downbaint bin}11 [ditto] mother's sister - yuckun down12 [ditto] mother's brother - 13 [ditto] brother's son -My wife - wrookut nittal rung[ditto] wife's sister wrookut nittal nung[ditto] mother's mother - cookun down[ditto] grandfather - waintdown[ditto] grandmother - nallungdown

NB I believe No 13 is "leet a nittal" ie "my son"The word "brebba" is translated by the blacksas "another one" - thus "brebba mungan nittal-another one father".

Last edit 5 months ago by ALourie

tip70-10-33-4 Howitt to Fison 7/6/1873

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1 My Father - Mung-an, nittal2 [ditto] Mother - yuck-an, down[son - crossed out]3 [ditto] son - leet a nittal5 [ditto] elder Brother - turndee down (turndung (is) = brother)6 [ditto] younger Brother - bean buttung {or bramung, nittalung7 [ditto] elder Sister - lurndee down {or bramung down8 [ditto] younger sister - bowung down9 [ditto] father's brother - brebba mung-an, nittal10 [ditto] father's sister - mummung}or } downbaint bin}11 [ditto] mother's sister - yuckun down12 [ditto] mother's brother - 13 [ditto] brother's son -My wife - wrookut nittal rung[ditto] wife's sister wrookut nittal nung[ditto] mother's mother - cookun down[ditto] grandfather - waintdown[ditto] grandmother - nallungdown

NB I believe No 13 is "leet a nittal" ie "my son"The word "brebba" is translated by the blacksas "another one" - thus "brebba mungan nittal-another one father".

Last edit 5 months ago by ALourie

tip70-10-33-5 Howitt to Fison 7/7/1873

3

3

those speaking the language in whichit is called "owie" or "cowie" (SouthAustralia - "the Hill tribes". There thesections of the Aborigines meet at theSalt lakes and I think have extendedfrom different points. Those saying "appa"have come down the Cooper's creek waters;and those saying "owie" from the westward;for I find this word extending westwardthrough [the -crossed out] South Australia round the GreatAustralian Bight to Western Australia.These languages again differ from thoseof the Darling where water is "oko" - differsso much that among the Yantruwuntasit was a standing joke against their neighboursof the Barrier Ranges that they called "a snakefire". The Darling word for snake being touroand the Coopers creek word for fire sance.I may note that here the words are-Fire towra - snake tur-rung.

Occasionally natives of Sturts desertthe "Murda pinna" of the Aborigineswill go down to Lake Hope and inall probability in this way the

Last edit about 2 months ago by ALourie
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