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XM689_ICDMS_lowres Chapter VI Tribal Governments

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carry, if he killed another it would be given to the second one, and itwas only when he obtained a heavy load that he carried anything himself.when I speak of these Headman in connection with the tribal (?) Ishall again refer to the henchmen.

The account given of these Headman given by Mr William Thomaswho was the protector of the Blacks in the years (?) , falls intoline with the particulars which have given. I have condensed his statement as follows! (1)

"Each tribe had a chief who directs all its movements, and whowherever he may be, knows well where all the members of the communityare. The chief with the aged men makes arrangements, forthe route eachparty is to take, when the tribe after one of its periodical meetingsagain separates.

Besides the chiefs they have other eminent men, as warriorscounsellors, doctors, dreamers who are also interpreters, charmers a whoare supposed to be able to bring or to drive rain away, and also to bringor send away plagues as occasion may require."

Such are Mr. Thomas's statements. Hehad great opportunitiesof pbtaining information, for as he says he was out with them for months";but it is much to be regretted that he did not more fully avail himselfof his opportunities, or if he did, he failed to record the results withthat detailwhich would have been now invaluable.

The Wurrunjeri clan of the Woeworung is a good example of thelesser tribal divisions, andof their Headmen. In order to make what Ishall say as to it more clear, it is (?) (?) (?) that (?) (?)(?) (?) (?) (?) (?) it was divided into three parts. One called Kuraje-barring, was subdiviedinto those who occupied the country from the Darebin Creek tothe sources of the Plenty River, under their HeadmanBebejern, and those who lived on the east side of the saltwater river up toMount Macedon (1) under the Headman Bilibellary. (8). the second division

Last edit 3 days ago by ALourie

XM692_ICDMS_lowres Chapter V Tribal Governments

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[Left margin note](1) Brief account of the aborigines of Australia FelixLatrobe Papers p 65.

The account given by Mr William Thomas the Black Protector Protector of the aborigines in the years ___ to ___ fall into line with the particulars I have given[crossed out - 4 lines] (1) I have condensed his statments as follows: "Each tribe has a chief who directs all its movementsand who wherever he may be, knows well where all the members of the community are. The chief with the aged (men?) makes arrangements for the route each party is to take when the tribe after one of its periodical meetings again separates.

Besides the chiefs they have other eminent men, as warriors, counsellors, doctors, dreamers who are also interpreters; charmers, who are supposed to be able to bring or drive rain away, also to bring or send plagues among other nations as occasion requires.

[crossed out - Bilibile] Bil-li-bel-la-rey was chief of the Yarra tribe. He stands foremost and justly so as ever having been the whiteman's friend- generous, frank and determined as he was".

Such are Mr Thomas's statements. He had great opportunities of obtaining information from [crossed out - he lived for more] as he says he was "out with them for months", but it is is [sic] much be regretted that he did not [crossed out - rec] apparently availhimself of his approbate, or if he did he failed to sendthe results with that detail which would have been so valuable to us now.

Last edit 3 days ago by ALourie

XM207 James to Howitt 3/10/1881

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Mansfield, 3rd Octr 1881A. W. Howitt Esq. P. M.Sale

Dear Sir, I very much regret that I am unable to give you fuller information on the points referred to in your first circular and on those in yours of 26th last month.

I enclose such replies as I am able to giveregarding the Blanchewater blacks, but I can givenone about the blacks who formerly inhabitedthis locality as they are all dead or gone away.

I saw Mr Chenery today and he said he was doing all he could to assist you. Mr Thomas McMillan also told me he would assist andsaid he would call up some evening and get me to put his replies in order, so far he has not put in an appearance, but I intend to remind him of his promise. I have delayed replying to your circular of August

Last edit 26 days ago by ALourie

hw0065 Andrew Lang to Howitt 15 October 1906

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of them, so far asvitiated by [??]error of apprehension,aspublicly as I can.The misprinted comma in Folk LoreI have explained as amisprint.

Perhaps I should saythat Mr Thomas wrotehis remarks in Folk Lore

Last edit 12 months ago by ALourie

XM533_ICDMS_lowres Bunjil Notes from William Thomas

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Bunjil

[B- crossed out] Pundjil was the maker of the earth, trees, animalsand men. His wife was Boi Boi, but he never sawher face. They had his children, a son named[Bbr - crossed out] Binbeal (Rainbow 4) and a daughter named KarakarookTo Binbeal is committed the sovereignty of the heavensand to Karakarook [the -crossed out] incidental occurrences on earth.

While great Pundjil stalks like "big one gentleman", inthe clouds on the earth +c carrying a "big one sword" -

Pallian brother of Pundjil made all seas, rivers +cHe governs the waters; was always in the waters, walkingbathing and going over the seas.

Punjil cut a sheet of bark and made figures with claycolored one black and the other not quite black. Put onone curly hair and called him Kookinberrookand on the other straight hair and named himBerrookboorn. He then lay on them and blew into their mouths + nostrils and navel and thetwo men began to move. He bade them get upwhich they did as young men.

[Pally - crossed out] Pallian by beating the thick muddywater caused two women to come out. He carried oneand then the other to his brother Punjil, who breathedinto their nostrils, mouth + navel and Punjil gave themnames Kurrewarra and Kuurook. They gaveeach Koolin a lubra. Punjil put a spear in eachKoolin's hand, and Karrakarrook put a]]Kannan]] (women's stick) into each lubra's hand.

Pundjil, Pallian and Karrakarook taught them how to spear Kangaroos, Emu, +c. One morning Punjil,Pallian and Karrakarook went up above.All agree that this took place far away in the North West.

Mr ThomasLa Trobe papers p. 65

Last edit about 2 months ago by ALourie
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