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188 HIRAM PUTNAM TO DOUGLASS, 7 JULY 1856

must confine myself to papers which advocate a different course. Please
discontinue the paper to me, and if the amount enclosed does not meet the
balance due you, let me know, and it shall be paid.
Your friend, In the cause of universal freedom,
HIRAM PUTNAM.

PLSr: FDP, 25 July 1856.

1. Born in Danvers, Massachusetts, Hiram Putnam (1786-1874) was a long-tenured sea captain
who moved to Syracuse, New York, in the late 1820s. There he became active in the Unitarian Church
and contributed much of his time and money to the local congregation until his death. Putnam became
an ardent abolitionist in Syracuse and gained the respect of many local abolitionists for his vocal op-
position to slavery. After Congress passed the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, he joined a committee of
local abolitionists and publicly denounced President Fillmore and Congress. In addition, Putnam sup-
ported social reform through education, and backed the establishment of public schools in Syracuse
and central New York. New York Times, 20 July 1852; In Memory of Captain Hiram Putnam, (n.p.,
c. 1874); Samuel J. May, Some Recollections of our Antislavery Conflict (Boston, 1869), 350.

2. To appeal to a broad base of Northern voters during the 1856 presidential election, the Repub-
lican party took great pains to repudiate accusations that it favored the abolition of slavery. Despite
disappointing many abolitionists in the North, party leaders knew that they needed to attract former
Know-Nothing and Democratic voters in order to win the presidency. The 1856 Republican platform
emphasized opposition to slavery’s extension into the western territories, but was content to let slav-
ery continue “where it already exists.” William E. Gienapp, The Origins of the Republican Party,
1852-1856
(New York, 1988), 331-38, 347, 362.

FREDERICK DOUGLASS TO JOSEPH COMSTOCK HATHAWAY1

Rochester[, N.Y.] 29 July 1856.
J. C. HATHAWAY:
MY DEAR FRIEND:
I am just leaving for New Bedford2—and have time only for a word in
response to your favor of yesterday. I should have been pleased with
Burnes’3 horse—The price is higher than I wish to go—I can not allow
mySelf more than two hundred dollars in horSe flesh—and from your ac-
count,—and I rely Solely upon your judgement in the matter—the beauti-
ful dark bay mare, at two hundred dollars must answer my purpose.

I shall not reach home till about the 20th August—At that time, or
there after, I will be glad to have an introduction to her Lady Ship—The
cash will be forth coming at that time—

Tell Dear Ann4 that I was sorry not to have Seen her Self and my
friend Miss Smith when they called at my office.

My kindest regards to your Dear household—I am Yours Truly—

FREDERICK DOUGLASS—

Y7271-Douglass_9780300218305.indb 188 1/26/18 9:41 AM

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