6

OverviewTranscribeVersionsHelp

Facsimile

Transcription

Status: Complete

304 HISTORICAL ANNOTATION

a Black Nationality: Black Emigration and Colonization, 1787- 1863 (Urbana, Ill.,
1975), 106-07, 110-15, 149; Winks, Blacks in Canada, 204-08, 254-55, 396-
97; Quarles, Black Abolitionists, 61-62, 185, 218-19; Pease and Pease, They Who
Would Be Free, 65, 252-53; Fred Landon, "Henry Bibb, a Colonizer," JNH, 5:
437-47 (October 1920).
9.25/xx.6 Covey] Edward Covey ( 1806?-75), who started out as a poor
farm-renter from Talbot County, Maryland, managed to accumulate $23,000 in
real estate by 1850. Covey's reputation as a slave breaker enabled him to rent or
even to receive the free use of field hands from local slave owners anxious to have
their slaves taught proper discipline. Harriet Lucretia Anthony, the great-grand-
daughter of Aaron Anthony, remembered that "Mr. Covey was really noted for his
cruelty and meanness." Inventory of the estate of Edward Covey, 15 May 1875,
Talbot County Inventories, TNC#3, 578, MdTCH; Harriet L. Anthony, annotated
copy of Bondage and Freedom, folder 93, 203, Dodge Collection, MdAA: 1850
U.S. Census, Maryland, Talbot County, 240 (free schedule); Preston, Young Fred-
erick Douglass, 117-31 .
9.39- 10.5/xx.23-28 "It has been . . . hers treasured up." [ Except for a few minor
errors, Smith slightly misquotes a passage from Bondage and Freedom, 34.22 - 27/
57.24-31.
10.13-26/xx.36-xxi. 12 "Aliens are we . . . and hypocritical church." ] Smith
misdates Douglass' s address to the annual convention of the American and Foreign
Anti-Slavery Society, in New York City, on 11 May 1853, not 1854, FDP, 27 May
1853; Douglass Papers, ser. 1, 2: 425 -26.
10.28-29/xxi. 14 - 15 New Bedford] Douglass lived in New Bedford, Massa-
chusetts, after his escape from slavery, staying in the city from 1838 until 1842.
William S. McFeely, Frederick Douglass (New York, 1991), 74-92.
10.32/xxi. 19 Garrisonians] In May 1840 the American abolitionist movement
divided into hostile, competing factions. Boston editor William Lloyd Garrison led
the most perfectionist-inclined group, most members of which abandoned the na-
tion's religious and political institutions as hopelessly corrupted by tolerance to-
ward slavery. John R. McKivigan, The War against Proslavery Religion: Aboli-
tionism in the Northern Churches, 1830- 1865 (Ithaca, N. Y., 1984), 56-92.
10.33/xxi.20 Nantucket] On 10-12 August 1841, Douglass attended a special
summer abolitionist convention on the island of Nantucket called by the Massa-
chusetts Anti-Slavery Society. Garrison also attended this gathering and strongly
applauded Douglass 's novice performance as an abolitionist orator. Lib., 20 Au-
gust 1841; McFeely, Frederick Douglass, 86-90.
10.35/xxi.22 the younger Pitt] William Pitt (1759-1806), often referred to as
"the younger Pitt," was the second son of the Earl of Chatham. He was elected to
Parliament in 1781 and became a noted opponent of Lord North's policies in the
American Revolution. At the age of twenty-four he became the youngest prime
minister of Britain, a position he held for seventeen years. Pitt was a reformer who

Notes and Questions

Nobody has written a note for this page yet

Please sign in to write a note for this page