39

OverviewTranscribeVersionsHelp

Facsimile

Transcription

Status: Complete

HISTORICAL ANNOTATION 337

Drayton, Personal Memoir of Daniel Drayton, for Four Years and Four Months a
Prisoner (for Charity's Sake) in Washington Jail: Including a Narrative of the Voy-
age and Capture of the Schooner Pearl
(Boston, 1855), 20–122; Stanley Harrold,
The Abolitionists and the Soulth, 1831–1861 (Lexington, Ky., 1995), 70, 154–55;
John H. Painter, "The Fugitives of the Pearl," JNH, 1: 243–64 (June 1916).
58.34/100.6 Emily Edmunson] Emily Edmondson was born a slave in the
Washington, D.C., area sometime in the early nineteenth century and was usually
hired out to local households. In 1848 she and most of the rest of her large family
numbered among the seventy-seven Washington-area slaves who unsuccessfully at-
tempted to escape slavery on the Pearl, a ship commanded by the antislavery Cap-
tain Daniel Drayton. Most of the slaves were sold as punishment into the Deep
South, and the Edmondsons were moved to New Orleans for sale there. The fortu-
itous discover of her recently freed brother, Hamilton, in New Orleans, however,
led to the return of most of the Emondsons to Baltimore, where they hoped money
could he raised to purchase their freedom. Their father in New York, who had
bought his freedom at forty-two, labored relentlessly to raise the money and finally
won the support of the famed minister Henry Ward Beecher, whose wealthy con-
gregation combined to raise the $2,250 needed to purchase Emily and her sister
Mary. Eventually most of the other Edmondsons were also acquired. The two sisters
became popular singers at abolitionist rallies. Harriet Beecher Stowe also under-
wrote a further year of study for Emily at Oberlin College. In 1853 Emily moved to
Washington D.C., married, and began assisting Myrtilla Miner, a white teacher, at
her controversial Normal School for Colored Girls. Catherine M. Hanchett, " 'What
Sort of People and Families . . . ': The Edmondson Sisters," Afro-Americans in New
York Life and History
, 6:21–37 (July 1982); Paynter, "Fugitives of the Pearl."
59.8/100.24 Indian meal—unbolted] Bolting was the art of sifting the ground
cornmeal, passing it through a sieve or bolting cloth. Unbolted meal was therefore
unsifted.
59.18/101.6 crash] A coarse kind of linen; also the name of a tint in textile fab-
rics, the color of unbleached cotton.
60.39/103.26–27 "ash cake"] A cake baked under the ashes of a fire .
61.19/104.22 "turning row,"] The unplanted end of a cultivated furrow where
horse or mule and plow make their turn to go hack up a new row.
62.32/107.22–23 "in purple and fine linen,"] Luke 16:19.
62.37/108.2 desideratum] Something for which a desire or longing is felt:
something wanting and required or desired.
63.2/108.4–5 Muscovite] A greenish black goose like duck having heavy red
wattles.
63.2–3/108.5 Guinea fowls] Any of several common African birds of the fam-
ily Numididea. Several types of Guinea fowl have been domesticated and raised
for flesh and eggs. The most common variety has a bony casque on its head, and
dark gray plumage spotted with white.

Notes and Questions

Nobody has written a note for this page yet

Please sign in to write a note for this page