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HISTORICAL ANNOTATION

tired from public life to edit the papers of his father and grandfather. Martin Duberman,
Charles Francis Adams, 1807-1886 (Stanford, Calif., 1968); NCAB, 8:
351-53; DAB, 1: 48-52.


231.10-11/401.5-6 Anti-slavery friends .... in Indiana The antislavery movement
in Wayne County, and several local societies formed as well. Indiana antislavery
societies were linked with various church denominations, especially the
Quakers. Support for the abolition movement led to divisions within many Indiana
churches, including the Quakers, who split over the issue of memher involvement
in antislavery societies that operated outside that religious group. Political abolitionism
and support for the antiextension movement also evolved slowly in Indiana.
In the state election of 1842 the Liberty party gained only nine hundred votes,
but that figure rose steadily throughout the decade. The Indiana Freeman, an anti-slavery
newspaper supporting the Liberty party, was published in Indianapolis in
the 1840s, and the cause of antiextension gained broad support once the Free Soil
party was formed. In the 1848 presidential election, the antiextension Free Soil
party claimed eight thousand votes in the state. Emma Lou Thornbrough, Indiana
in the Civil War Era, 1850-1880 (Indianapolis, 1965 ), 19-23; Etta Reeves French,
"Stephen S. Harding: A Hoosier Abolitionist." Indiana Magazine of History, 27:
220-22 (March 1931).

232. 18/403.8 Gov. George N. Briggs George Nixon Briggs (1796-1861), attorney
Whig, Briggs was known to be conservative on the slavery issue. I opposed
the Mexican War as an attempt to extend slavery, but complied with the federal
government's request to supply troops from Massachusetts. This action led some
abolitionists, including Wendell Phillips, to condemn Briggs as a traitor to anti-slavery
principles. Briggs was active in a number of reform-minded organizations,
and at various times after 1846 he served as president of the American Baptist Missionary
Union, the American Tract Society, and the American Temperance Union.
After his retirement as governor in 1851, Briggs practiced law with his son, was a
delegate to the 1853 Massachusetts constitutional convention, and was appointed a
judge of the Court of Common Pleas. ANB, 3: 539-41.

232.25/403.18 Pittsfield Pittsfield is a small town in Merrimack County,
Cohen, Columbia Gazettee of the World. 3: 2450.

232.28-29/403.24 Boston and New Bedford railroad This is probably the
from New Bedford to Taunton, where it connected with another short branch
between Taunton and Mansfield that was in operation as early as 1836. The Taunton
Branch Railroad originally formed an independent branch of the Boston and Providence
Railroad, giving it a connection to Boston. Baker, Formation of the New England Railroad Systems, 36-37 .

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