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RCH in KZ at Sep 13, 2022 10:23 PM

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332 HISTORICAL ANNOTATION

45.31–32/77.8 "MAS' DANIEL."] Daniel Lloyd (1811–?) was the sixth child
and youngest son of Edward Lloyd V. Daniel became a farmer, and his wealth in-
creased steadily, with the number of slaves he owned expanding from eighteen to
thirty-six between 1840 and 1850. By the latter year he possessed real estate valued
at twenty-five thousand dollars. After the death of his father, Lloyd resided at the
nearby Wye Heights Plantation, earlier built for Edward Lloyd VI and his wife.
Daniel's son, Henry, was Maryland's governor in the 1880s. 1840 U.S. Census,
Maryland, Talbot County, 59; 1850 U.S. Census, Maryland, Talbot County, 11a
(free schedule), 14 (slave schedule); Preston, Young Frederick Douglass, 54–55,
61, 81, 221n21; Tilghman, Talbot County, 1: 207, 212.
46.6/77.28 Edward] Born in the Annapolis home of his maternal grandpar-
ents, Edward Lloyd VI (1798–1861) was the oldest child and principal heir of his
father's great wealth. Educated at the Wye House plantation by tutors, the younger
Lloyd received charge of a nearby plantation where his father built him the beauti-
ful Wye Heights mansion upon his marriage in 1824 to Alicia McBlair, daughter of
a Baltimore merchant. She died prematurely in 1838 after bearing five children.
After inheriting the bulk of his father's land holdings, Lloyd successfully shifted
from tobacco to grain farming and weathered the agricultural depression that
struck most of the Eastern Shore in the 1840s and 1850s. Lloyd also purchased cot-
ton-growing land in Mississippi in 1837 and later added more in Arkansas and
Louisiana. He transferred some of his swelling slave population to those new plan-
tations. Though reputedly a stern disciplinarian, he did try to avoid separating fam-
ilies during these relocations and when sales occurred. A lifelong Democrat, Lloyd
served as a delegate to the Maryland constitutional convention of 1850 and as a
state senator (1851–52). 1850 U.S. Census, Maryland, Talbot County, 6–10 (slave
schedule); Tilghman, Talbot County, 1: 210–21; Preston, Young Frederick Doug-
lass
, 42–43, 44–45, 70, 192; Tilghman, "Wye House," 89–108.
46.6/77.28 Murray] James Murray Lloyd (1803–47) was the middle son of
Edward Lloyd V and Sally Murray Scott. When he married, his father built a man-
sion for him called Presqu'ile, which quickly hecame a Talbot County showplace.
In 1840 he was one of the region's richest farmers, owning 113 slaves. 1840 U.S.
Census, Maryland, Talbot County, 60; Stella Pickett Hardy, Colonial Families of
the Southern States of America
(New York, 1911), 387; Tilghman, Talbot County,
1: 207, 222; Preston, Young Frederick Douglas, 47, 49–50, 69, 70.
46.10/78.3 Edward Winder] Edward Stoughton Winder, son of Levin Winder,
the sixteenth governor of Maryland, and Mary Sloss, married Elizaheth Tayloe
Lloyd, the eldest daughter of Edward Lloyd V, in 1820. Their son, Charles Sidney
Winder, became a Confederate brigadier general. Edward probably died before
1850, as that year's census lists Elizabeth, rather than him, as the family head. 1850
U.S. Census, Maryland, Talbot County, 52 (free schedule); Tilghman, Talbot
County
, 1: 207; Preston, Young Frederick Douglass, 221–22; Hardy, Colonial
Families
, 387; NCAB, 5: 514.

34

332

HISTORICAL ANNOTATION

45 .31-32/77.8
"MAs' DANIEL.") Daniel Lloyd ( 1811 -'?) was the sixth child
and youngest son of Edward Lloyd V. Daniel became a farmer. and his wealth in-
creased steadily, with the number of slaves he owned expanding from eighteen to
thirty-six between 1840 and 1850. By the latter year he possessed real estate valued
at twenty-five thousand dollars. After the death of his father. Lloyd resided at the
nearby Wye Heights Plantation, earlier built for Edward Lloyd VI and his wife.
Daniel's son, Henry, was Maryland's governor in the 1880s. 1840 U.S. Census,
Maryland. Talbot County, 59: 1850 U.S. Census, Maryland, Talbot County, 11a
(free schedule), 14 (slave schedule); Preston, Young Frederick Douglass, 54-55.
61, 81, 221n21; Tilghman, Talbot County, 1: 207, 212.

46.6/77.28 Edward] Born in the Annapolis home of his maternal grandpar-
ents, Edward Lloyd VI ( 1798-1861) was the oldest child and principal heir of his
father's great wealth. Educated at the Wye House plantation hy tutors, the younger
Lloyd received charge of a nearby plantation where his father built him the heauti-
ful Wye Heights mansion upon his marriage in 1824 to Alicia McBlair, daughter of
a Baltimore merchant. She died prematurely in 1838 after hearing five children.
After inheriting the bulk of his father's land holdings, Lloyd successfully shifted
from tobacco to grain farming and weathered the agricultural depression that
struck most of the Eastern Shore in the 1840s and 1850s. Lloyd also purchased cot-
ton-growing land in Mississippi in 1837 and later added more in Arkansas and
Louisiana. He transferred some of his swelling slave population to those new plan-
tations. Though reputedly a stern disciplinarian, he did try to avoid separating fam-
ilies during these relocations and when sales occurred. A lifelong Democrat, Lloyd
served as a delegate to the Maryland constitutional convention of 1850 and as a
state senator ( 1851-52). 1850 U.S. Census, Maryland, Talbot County, 6-10 (slave
schedule); Tilghman, Talbot Count,·. 1: 210-21; Preston, Young Frederick Doug-
lass, 42-43, 44-45, 70, 192; Tilghman, "Wye House," 89-108.

46.6/77.28 Murray] James Murray Lloyd (1803-47) was the middle son of
Edward Lloyd V and Sally Murray Scott. When he married, his father huilt a man-
sion for him called Presqu'ile, which quickly hecame a Talbot County showplace.
In 1840 he was one of the region's richest farmers, owning 113 slaves. 1840 U.S.
Census, Maryland, Talbot County, 60; Stella Pickett Hardy, Colonial Families of
the Southern States of America (New York, 1911), 387; Tilghman, Talbot County,
1: 207, 222; Preston, Young Frederick Douglas, 47, 49-50, 69, 70.

46. 10/78.3 Edward Winder] Edward Stoughton Winder, son of Levin Winder,
the sixteenth governor of Maryland, and Mary Sloss, married Elizaheth Tayloe
Lloyd, the eldest daughter of Edward Lloyd Y. in 1820. Their son. Charles Sidney
Winder, became a Confederate brigadier general. Edward probably died before
1850, as that year's census lists Elizabeth, rather than him, as the family head. 1850
U.S. Census, Maryland, Talbot County, 52 (free schedule); Tilghman, Talbot
County, 1: 207; Preston, Young Frederick Douglass, 221-22 : Hardy, Colonial
Families, 387;NCAB, 5: 514.