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xl INTRODUCTION TO VOLUME TWO

As in the case of the Narrative, members of the household of Doug-
lass’s master challenged the former slave’s account of his Maryland years
in Bondage and Freedom. The criticisms of the second autobiography
came, however, long after its publication, when Aaron Anthony’s great=
granddaughter, Harriet Lucretia Anthony, annotated her copy of the book in
1919 with forty-nine corrections, expansions, or corroborations. Although
many of her annotations consisted of biographical data on individuals men-
tioned in the text, she also noted passages that she felt were untrue or that
contradicted plantation records in her possession. Some of Douglass's
statements she labeled simply as “an exaggeration" or “unlikely.” In sum-
marizing her general reaction to Bondage and Freedom, Anthony declared
that Douglass “exaggerates the story of the many cruelties he suffered as a
slave in my great grandfather’s, Aaron Anthony, family.”76

Douglass would probably have been delighted with Harriet Anthony's
annotation because she corroborated so many of his statements. Often
when she rejected his characterization of people she based her response on
what she perceived as the logical behavior of rational slaveholders. An-
thony tried to be fair in her evaluations and conceded that some of her own
relatives had probably been as intemperate as Douglass described them. On
other occasions she corroborated Douglass's descriptions. For example,
she wrote beside Douglass’s portrait of the cruel slave breaker Edward
Covey: “This Mr. Covey was really noted for his cruelty and meanness."77

Whereas Douglass received lavish praise from abolitionists when he
published the Narrative, he incurred the wrath of the Garrisonians with his
portrayal of them in Bondage and Freedom. In 1845 Douglass was a pro-
tege and such a faithful follower of William Lloyd Garrison that the editor
of the Boston Liberator joined Wendell Phillips in writing prefatory letters
to the Narrative and later publicizing it in his newspaper. By 1855 Doug-
lass had abandoned many of the antislavery principles still dear to Garrison
and discussed his new ideas in Bondage and Freedom.78 The consequence
was that the Garrisonian journals generally refused to review the book. The
praise eventually heaped on the autobiography in the United Kingdom,
however, led Garrison to mount a concentrated attack on it. The immediate
catalyst was a favorable review written by the English abolitionist George
Thompson in the London Empire. Upon reading the review, Garrison fired

76. See Appendix D.
77. Ibid.
78. McFeely, Douglass, 175-78; Martin, Mind of Frederick Douglass, 25-48.

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