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RCH in KZ at Sep 17, 2022 04:28 PM

6

Textual Notes

These notes explain our resolution of problems in the copy-text and our treatment
of variants in the authoritative texts. Because the copy-text underwent no revisions
intended to alter either the style or the content of the main text, these notes focus
entirely on our attempts to correct compositorial errors both in accidentals and in
substantives. Each note begins with the page and line number of the Yale edition
and the page and line number in the copy-text followed by the adopted reading. all
enclosed in a square bracket. The note follows the square bracket.

Most emendations are not explicated in these notes because they are clearly
demanded by the context in which the problems they address occur. The List of
Emendations identifies each of the emendations explained in a textual note with an
asterisk.

The symbols used to stand for the collated impressions and printings are the
same ones employed in the Textual Introduction: (1) the copy-text, a copy of the
first impression of the 1855 printing, is designated as A1; (2) four copies of the 1855
printing that were members of one or more later impressions are collectively des-
ignated as A2–5; (3) the 1856 printing is designated as B; and (4) the 1857 printing
is designated as C.

Each textual note dealing with a variant that appears in one or more authorita-
tive texts identifies the edition or impression in which the variant first appears. If
the note identifies one text in which the variant appears without specifying that it
appears only in that text, it is correct to infer that the variant appears in all subse-
quent editions and impressions. If a variant does not reside in all subsequent edi-
tions and impressions, the note identifies those in which it occurs.

24.5/38.16 and-by] A trace of the hyphen occurs in C.
25.33/41.13 barn-yard] All examined copies have "barn-door," but "barn-
door fowls" is nonsensical. Douglass's obvious intention to modify "fowls" with
"barn-yard" was probably thwarted by an inattentive compositor.
28.4/45.23 meat] As part of an analogy comparing his condition to that of a
sacrificial lamb. Douglass obviously intended to refer to himself as a "meat offering."
33.7/55.12 there] Although each examined copy contains "their," it clashes
with the context. The compositor may somehow have been induced to substitute
"their" for "there" by the similarity in pronunciation.
56.3/95.19 nor] Douglass clearly intended a "neither ... nor" construction,
but the compositor's oversight turned "nor" into "not," a mistake that remained un-
corrected in all printings and impressions.

290

6

Textual Notes

These notes explain our resolution of problems in the copy-text and our treatment
of variants in the authoritative texts. Because the copy-text underwent no revisions
intended to alter either the style or the content of the main text, these notes focus
entirely on our attempts to correct compositorial errors both in accidentals and in
substantives. Each note begins with the page and line number of the Yale edition
and the page and line number in the copy-text followed by the adopted reading. all
enclosed in a square bracket. The note follows the square bracket.

Most emendations are not explicated in these notes because they are clearly
demanded by the context in which the problems they address occur. The List of
Emendations identifies each of the emenJations explained in a textual note with an
asterisk.

The symbols used to stand for the collated impressions and printings are the
same ones employed in the Textual Introduction: (1) the copy-text. a copy of the
first impression of the 1855 printing, is designated as A1; (2) four copies of the 1855
printing that were members of one or more later impressions are collectively des-
ignated as A2-5; (3) the 1856 printing is designated as B; and (4) the 1857 printing
is designated as C.

Each textual note dealing with a variant that appears in one or more authorita-
tive texts identifies the edition or impression in which the variant first appears. If
the note identifies one text in which the variant appears without specifying that it
appears only in that text, it is correct to infer that the variant appears in all subse-
quent editions and impressions. If a variant does not reside in all subsequent edi-
tions and impressions, the note identifies those in which it occurs.

24.5/38.16 and-by] A trace of the hyphen occurs in C.
25.33/41.13 barn-yard] All examined copies have "barn-door," but "barn-
door fowls" is nonsensical. Douglass's obvious intention to modify "fowls" with
"barn-yard" was probably thwarted by an inattentive compositor.
28.4/45.23 meat] As part of an analogy comparing his condition to that of a
sacrificial lamb. Douglass obviously intended to refer to himself as a "meat offering."
33.7/55.12 there] Although each examined copy contains "their," it clashes
with the context. The compositor may somehow have been induced to substitute
"their" for "there" by the similarity in pronunciation.
56.3/95.19 nor] Douglass clearly intended a "neither ... nor" construction,
but the compositor's oversight turned "nor" into "not," a mistake that remained un-
corrected in all printings and impressions.

290