English recipe book, 17th century and later MS 8575

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Collection of medical and culinary recipes in several hands.

The recipes are written into a volume that was originally designed for recording classical exempla, epigrams, or extracts from Roman authors; a few entries have been made under such headings as 'Ars', 'Clementia', and 'Crudelitas'. However the volume was seemingly soon repurposed as a recipe compendium. The earliest and largest number of recipe entries are in a later 17th century hand that is also responsible for the index at the start of the volume; a few entries were made by later contributors, the latest apparently in the later 18th or even early 19th century (f. 41).

Various authorities for the recipes are cited. Among the the medical ones are 'Doctor Pridgeon' [? Francis Prigeon] (f. 10); 'Doctor Lower' [Richard Lower, 1631-1691] (ff. 11, 99); 'Dr Butler' (f. 23); 'Doctr Bucanon' (f. 30); 'Docr Smith of Portsmouth' (f. 31); 'Docter Pechey' [John Pechey, d.1718] (f. 33); 'Doctor Colebatch' (f. 40); 'Dct Hunt' (f. 41); 'Doctor Windebank' [John Windebanke MD, fl.1654-1680] (f. 47); 'Doctor Dover' [Thomas Dover, d.1742] (f. 49); 'Doct Nisbit' (f. 140); 'Doctor Speers' (f. 141); 'Doctr Ross' (f. 154); 'Doctr Rosewel' [? John Rosewell] (f. 155); 'Doctor Coladin' (f. 158); and 'Dr Ridgley' [?Thomas Ridgley, d. 1656] (f. 163). Lay authorities include the Countess of Arundel [Anne Howard, nee Dacre,countess of Arundel, 1557-1630] (f. 24); Sir William Temple [1628-1699] (f. 50); and 'Sir Edward Tencil' (f. 134). There are also extensive extracts from Gerard's Herbal (ff. 170-74). An 18th century contributor has inserted a copy of a verse aphorism that seems to have been something of a commonplace at the time: 'spare not, nor spend too much, be this thy care, spare but to spend, and only spend to spare, Who spends too much, may want and so complain, but he spends best, that leaves to spend again' (f. 22). Cf. MS.7849.

The language of the volume is English, with parts in Latin.

Collection of medical and culinary recipes in several hands.

The recipes are written into a volume that was originally designed for recording classical exempla, epigrams, or extracts from Roman authors; a few entries have been made under such headings as 'Ars', 'Clementia', and 'Crudelitas'. However the volume was seemingly soon repurposed as a recipe compendium. The earliest and largest number of recipe entries are in a later 17th century hand that is also responsible for the index at the start of the volume; a few entries were made by later contributors, the latest apparently in the later 18th or even early 19th century (f. 41).

Various authorities for the recipes are cited. Among the the medical ones are 'Doctor Pridgeon' [? Francis Prigeon] (f. 10); 'Doctor Lower' [Richard Lower, 1631-1691] (ff. 11, 99); 'Dr Butler' (f. 23); 'Doctr Bucanon' (f. 30); 'Docr Smith of Portsmouth' (f. 31); 'Docter Pechey' [John Pechey, d.1718] (f. 33); 'Doctor Colebatch' (f. 40); 'Dct Hunt' (f. 41); 'Doctor Windebank' [John Windebanke MD, fl.1654-1680] (f. 47); 'Doctor Dover' [Thomas Dover, d.1742] (f. 49); 'Doct Nisbit' (f. 140); 'Doctor Speers' (f. 141); 'Doctr Ross' (f. 154); 'Doctr Rosewel' [? John Rosewell] (f. 155); 'Doctor Coladin' (f. 158); and 'Dr Ridgley' [?Thomas Ridgley, d. 1656] (f. 163). Lay authorities include the Countess of Arundel [Anne Howard, nee Dacre,countess of Arundel, 1557-1630] (f. 24); Sir William Temple [1628-1699] (f. 50); and 'Sir Edward Tencil' (f. 134). There are also extensive extracts from Gerard's Herbal (ff. 170-74). An 18th century contributor has inserted a copy of a verse aphorism that seems to have been something of a commonplace at the time: 'spare not, nor spend too much, be this thy care, spare but to spend, and only spend to spare, Who spends too much, may want and so complain, but he spends best, that leaves to spend again' (f. 22). Cf. MS.7849.

The language of the volume is English, with parts in Latin.



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448 Auxilium Auxilium
14

Balneum Barba
for the Kings Evel

Take the best & whitest spunge you can get pick it clean from the stones & gravel wash it & dry it with a cloth burn it in a refiers refiners pott then beat it to powder & searce it fine if the party be 13 or 14 years old you may give him as much as wil ly upon a groat or six pence if older or younger proportionable thay must take it every morning in a lettle bear or Ale fasting an hour or two after it take it so for a mounth then leave it for a mounth then take it again as before

Madam Bowcock

For an Ague

Tak a pint of Water the Iuice of Six Lemons two drams of Salt of Wormwood put to it 5 or 6 Spoonfull of cordiall as Rum or such a thing Tak of this six Spoofull once in three of hours

Last edit 16 days ago by Noumenon
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46 Barbaries Beatitudo
15
Bellum Bellum 47
Iust Oxym
L 1o co anno prima longinque non finitima
bella gerebant nec imperium sibi sed
populis suis gloriam quarebant condenti que
victoria mipeno abstinebunt
Dictum Tamachi Athenae duris sci: quid
belligeratibus bis errare non accedit
A Poultis for any rageing pain

Receipt a pint of milk & boyl in six peniworth of the best Saffron cut very small boyl them togather a quarter of an hour then thicken it with white bread to the consistence of a poultis then put into it two ounces of ointment of populeen & the quantity of a Walnut of Soft Sope and apply it to the part as hot as the Person can indure it twice a day if there be an inflamation in the part Leave out the Sope

for worms in young or old

Receipt take 3 pints of bear or Ale one ounce of Aniseeds a lettle brused as much Liqurish sliced a sponfull of wormseed a quarter of an ounce of Seany boil all these to gather til a pint be consumed then add to it 3 sponfull of Treacle & two ounces of sugar strain it out & give the child three daies togather in the morning fasting at aleven of the clock & at three in the afternoon three spounfulls at a time

Last edit 16 days ago by Noumenon
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Needs Review

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For The Pleurisie

Take a Handfull of green Broom boyl it in a quart of Ale til it comes near to a pint mixt with it half an ounce of methridate & give it the party this hath cured when leting Blood would not

An Excelant way to prepare steel powder

Take a flat pice of Iron heat it red hot in a Smiths forge & Strew on it powder of Brimston which wil make the Iron run hold it over a pail of water & let it run into it & when it tis cold beat it to powder

To cure the Meange in Dogs

fflower of Brimstone powder of Elacompane & beaten Ginger of each one ounce melt em in one pound of Hogs lard & one stone of unslact Lime put into the Lard when it boyles and anoynt the therewith & keep him tyed up in cleane str

Last edit 12 months ago by Veena
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Needs Review

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The Phisick Water

Take 3 pints of Brandy poppy water Black Cherry Water & Caridus Water of each half a pint a pound of Raisons of the Son of Liquorish & Senna of each one ounce an ounce & a half of Rubarb Sweet Fenill Seeds & Anay seeds of Each one ounce put all these into the Brandy & let it in fuse nin or ten daies by the fire or els put it in the oven 3 times after Bread is drawn when it tis thus infused keep it for your use you may put in a quart of Brandy & a pint of the other small waters into the things you strained out & let them infuse as the others did & so make a smaller water to drink as you see ocasion. you must ston your Raisons bruse your seeds slice your Rubarbe & Liquorice dry your Safforn & beat it to a fine powder & beat your Scutchenile very fine four peniworth of Safforn & six peniworth of Seutchenile

Last edit 12 months ago by Veena
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Needs Review

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An Exelent Recept for a cough

Take a quarter of a pound of the best Honey & a quarter of a pint of Con conduit water boyl them as long as any White scum ariseth & take it of the fire then take a quarter of a pound of the best blue corrance sett them on the fire in a pint of water & boyl them till thay be tender then power the water from them & Bruse them through a fine hare sive & put that Juce & honey togather add to it one ounce of the powder of Likorish & one ounce of the powder of Anniseeds mix all these wel togather & When it tis cold tie it up. The party may take it upon the Top of a knife morning & Evening as often as the Cough trubles them

Madam Wharton

The Brimstone Drink for Shortness of Breath

Take an Earthen pipken & put into it three quarts of spring water & an ounce of the Flour of Brimstone & boyl it til one quart is consumed then have in rediness two ounces of Licorish & scrape it clean & bruse it then put it out into thin flakes & with eight drams of coriander seeds brused put them into an Earthen pan then strain the Brimstone Liquor hot into it then cover it very close for ten hours & drink as off often as you pleas a wine glas full. when you are trubled with shortness of breath drink this for fourteen days.

Mrs Layfield

Last edit 12 months ago by Veena
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