English recipe book, 17th century and later MS 8575

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Collection of medical and culinary recipes in several hands.

The recipes are written into a volume that was originally designed for recording classical exempla, epigrams, or extracts from Roman authors; a few entries have been made under such headings as 'Ars', 'Clementia', and 'Crudelitas'. However the volume was seemingly soon repurposed as a recipe compendium. The earliest and largest number of recipe entries are in a later 17th century hand that is also responsible for the index at the start of the volume; a few entries were made by later contributors, the latest apparently in the later 18th or even early 19th century (f. 41).

Various authorities for the recipes are cited. Among the the medical ones are 'Doctor Pridgeon' [? Francis Prigeon] (f. 10); 'Doctor Lower' [Richard Lower, 1631-1691] (ff. 11, 99); 'Dr Butler' (f. 23); 'Doctr Bucanon' (f. 30); 'Docr Smith of Portsmouth' (f. 31); 'Docter Pechey' [John Pechey, d.1718] (f. 33); 'Doctor Colebatch' (f. 40); 'Dct Hunt' (f. 41); 'Doctor Windebank' [John Windebanke MD, fl.1654-1680] (f. 47); 'Doctor Dover' [Thomas Dover, d.1742] (f. 49); 'Doct Nisbit' (f. 140); 'Doctor Speers' (f. 141); 'Doctr Ross' (f. 154); 'Doctr Rosewel' [? John Rosewell] (f. 155); 'Doctor Coladin' (f. 158); and 'Dr Ridgley' [?Thomas Ridgley, d. 1656] (f. 163). Lay authorities include the Countess of Arundel [Anne Howard, nee Dacre,countess of Arundel, 1557-1630] (f. 24); Sir William Temple [1628-1699] (f. 50); and 'Sir Edward Tencil' (f. 134). There are also extensive extracts from Gerard's Herbal (ff. 170-74). An 18th century contributor has inserted a copy of a verse aphorism that seems to have been something of a commonplace at the time: 'spare not, nor spend too much, be this thy care, spare but to spend, and only spend to spare, Who spends too much, may want and so complain, but he spends best, that leaves to spend again' (f. 22). Cf. MS.7849.

The language of the volume is English, with parts in Latin.

Collection of medical and culinary recipes in several hands.

The recipes are written into a volume that was originally designed for recording classical exempla, epigrams, or extracts from Roman authors; a few entries have been made under such headings as 'Ars', 'Clementia', and 'Crudelitas'. However the volume was seemingly soon repurposed as a recipe compendium. The earliest and largest number of recipe entries are in a later 17th century hand that is also responsible for the index at the start of the volume; a few entries were made by later contributors, the latest apparently in the later 18th or even early 19th century (f. 41).

Various authorities for the recipes are cited. Among the the medical ones are 'Doctor Pridgeon' [? Francis Prigeon] (f. 10); 'Doctor Lower' [Richard Lower, 1631-1691] (ff. 11, 99); 'Dr Butler' (f. 23); 'Doctr Bucanon' (f. 30); 'Docr Smith of Portsmouth' (f. 31); 'Docter Pechey' [John Pechey, d.1718] (f. 33); 'Doctor Colebatch' (f. 40); 'Dct Hunt' (f. 41); 'Doctor Windebank' [John Windebanke MD, fl.1654-1680] (f. 47); 'Doctor Dover' [Thomas Dover, d.1742] (f. 49); 'Doct Nisbit' (f. 140); 'Doctor Speers' (f. 141); 'Doctr Ross' (f. 154); 'Doctr Rosewel' [? John Rosewell] (f. 155); 'Doctor Coladin' (f. 158); and 'Dr Ridgley' [?Thomas Ridgley, d. 1656] (f. 163). Lay authorities include the Countess of Arundel [Anne Howard, nee Dacre,countess of Arundel, 1557-1630] (f. 24); Sir William Temple [1628-1699] (f. 50); and 'Sir Edward Tencil' (f. 134). There are also extensive extracts from Gerard's Herbal (ff. 170-74). An 18th century contributor has inserted a copy of a verse aphorism that seems to have been something of a commonplace at the time: 'spare not, nor spend too much, be this thy care, spare but to spend, and only spend to spare, Who spends too much, may want and so complain, but he spends best, that leaves to spend again' (f. 22). Cf. MS.7849.

The language of the volume is English, with parts in Latin.



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68 Charitas Charitas

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Chorea Cibus 69
A Drink for the Plague or pestilent feaver proved by the Countess of Arundel 1603

Take a pint of Malmsey & burn it & put thereto a spoonfull of grains being bruised & take four spoonful of the same in a porringer & put therein a spoonful of Jean Treacle & give the patient to drink as hot as he can suffer it & let him drink a draught of the Malmsey after it & so sweat if he be Vehemently infected he wil bring the Medicine up again but you must apply the same very often day & night til he brook it for so long as he doth bring it up a gain there is danger of him but if he once brook it there is no doubt of his recovery by the Grace of God provided then when the party infected hath taken the afore said Medicine & sweateth if he bring it up again then you must give him the afore said quan tity of Malmsey & grains but no treacle for it wil be to hot for him being in a sweat.

For corns

Take Frankinsince Three quarters of an ounce Bees Wax a quarter of an ounce & Hoggs Lard half a quarter of an ounce melt it & stir it wel togather spread it upon cloth or Leather cut your corns & lay it to them

Last edit 22 days ago by Noumenon
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70 Circumstantia Ciuitas
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Clementia Clementia 73
Q Cu:p 4a Philippus Atheniensibus per insiderae victae
cum interficere poterat omnes in columes
sine praetio demisit
fflo:pa. Lupa relictis catulis Remi et Romuli
nugitum secuta ibera ad movet
et matrem sibi gessit
Romulus cum urbi in colae deerant
in luco haud procul remoto asylum fa
cit et statin mira vie hominum
condiluxere
For the small pox not kindly coming out or struck in or any pestilentill desease sudely sudenly infecting the Blood & for the Biting of a Mad Dog

Take a full quart of strong ale ale one good handfull of red Sage, as much Rue, three heads of Gerlick, half a pound of Trekle, one very good Spoonful of the finest Penter finly rasped, & one good handfull of Rosemary, & & green Box & Goats rue of each a handfull put all these into a pipkin close pasted up so that no steme may come out & set it over a gentle fire untel a quarter be wasted be sure it doth not boyl over in Twelve hour it wil be parficted then Strain it out & keep it for your use if it Mould over it it is no harm to it you need only put it by the use of it is if the small pox do not come out wel or if afer ward thay go in or fall flat after give to to a Man Six spoonfulls & to a Woman four & to a Childe 3 spoonfulls taking nothing in two hours after & as you find Cause you may give in the Same space of time the Same quantity & as oft as you think the person in danger. for the Biting of a Mad Dog give Six Spoonfulls presently & as much in a morning & Evening fasting & likwise the next full & change of the Moon for any Pestilantiall Desease give the same quantity

Last edit 22 days ago by Noumenon
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Last edit 10 months ago by Veena
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To make the Green oyntment

Take red sage & rue of each one pound the yongest bay leaves & wormwood of each half a pound pick them & cut cut them small & beat them wel in a morter then take three pound of sheeps sewett mince it small then beat it with the hearbs until it be of one culler then put to it a pottle of the best oyle olyue work all togather until all becom alike soft put it into an earthen pot wel stoped for 8 daies then boyl it with a soft fire put to it being half boiled four ounces of oyle of spick have a care you doe not burn it drop it on a savcer & when it is very green it is anouf then strain it throw a canvis cloth in to your pots which must be close cover'd with parchment & leather over it it wil keep many years if you keep it coul

anoynt the place greved rubing it untel it dry in it easeth the stone rub in it into the back a lettle put into the eare with som black wooll eas helpeth all pain there of it is excelant against aches fellows scabbes anguish swelling of wounds tooth ach bruseing or over straining of the sinewes & vaynes crampes stichis seatiea burning scalding stif strains ether in man or beast it is made only in may

A singular & approved receipt to cause speedy safe & easye deliverance

Take yollow Amber in powder the weight of two groats mixed in a small draught of mace drink & give it her in hard Trauil warmed let the Amber be finly pounded with rose water

A good purg for coller or hot humers

Take Manna in grains the waight of ten groats in fuse it in two sponfull of burage or bugleos water stir it until it be disolved then put unto it cassa fistula newly drawn out of the cane half an ounce & one ounce of the surrup of Vilots m mix & drink it at a draught in the morning

For the falling sickness

Take a handfull of Rew as much wormwood make them into fine powder & blow there of into there nostrels when thay fall & this wil cause them to rise presently

For a great pain in the Head & to cause them to Sleepe

Take oyle of Violotts with the yolk of one egg & Womans milk of each a like quantity mix all wel togather make a plaster there of & lay it all over the forehead when you goe to bed

For the Stich of the Hart or pain of the side

drink morning & evening Endive water distiled

Last edit about 1 year ago by Veena
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Needs Review

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For the Merum & to purg the Head

take 3 or 4 pils made of the root of pillitory of spain put them into your nostrelle & let them stick until thay fall out then wipe them & put them in a gain use this 4 or 5 times & this wil purg the head of a mighty deal of fowl & gross humeres & help you greatly

For Sinowes or Vains that are cut asunder

Take the same blood that comes out of the wound & mixe it wel with salit oyle & lay it untothe wound & this wil soun knit the sinewes & vains togather

For the Rum Reume & an undegsting stomake

Take the Tops of red fennel red sage red mintss & the tops of red nettles & the tops of rosemary of each a handfull boyl them with a handfull of french barly in runing water from a pottle to a quart then let it easely destil through a thick cloth & drink it fasting

A medicyne for an Ague

Take of smaledge cut small & Baysalt of each a handfull & two peniworth of Venice Turpentine a lettel ricf levin a lettle cobwel half a handfull of the in ward pill of elder beat wel these in a morter to a salve & spread it upon leather & lay it to both your wrists & remove it not for nine daies

A drink for a sore brest

Take strong Ale & put in fine wheat flower & mix it unti until it look white but not thick for anoying of the stomake then put into it cockell shell full of the powder of cuttlell bone mix it & drink it three times morning & evening. & her brest wil not be sore this must be done when she feels a pricking in her brest

for an extreame cold at the Stomake

make a posit of white wine & when you have taken away the curd put in a good quantity of camomell & Gsope to your discretion & make it somwhat plesant with sugar strain it & drink it as hot as can be suferd

A powder for the Wind in the stomack

Take Ginger Sinamon & Gallingal of each an ounce Anni seeds Carraway Seeds fel fennill seeds of each half an ounce long pepper Grains Mace & Nutmeg of each two drams setwall one drame make all into fine powder & put to it two pound of fine sugar & use this powder before or afer meat it may be taken at all times it camforts the stomack much exspels m wind & cavseth a good Digestion

An Excelant medicin for the Jaundes

Take of the bigest Earthworms splet them in the longwaies with a bodkin & wash them clean & dry them with a cloth then dry then leasurly between two tyles with embers above & below when thay are very dry beate them to powder & give to the patient as much of it as wil lie upon a groat in white wine for three mornings fasting at lest an hour after

Last edit 12 months ago by Veena
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