Wellcome Collection: Manuscript recipe book of Grace Carteret, 1st Countess Granville (1654-1744) (MS.8903)

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English manuscript book of medicinal and culinary recipes owned by Grace Carteret, 1st Countess Granville (1654-1744), with ownership inscription on the inside front cover.

The volume is closely associated with the contemporary Ann Fanshawe recipe manuscript held by the Wellcome Library (MS.7113). The Carterets and Fanshawes were family friends, as Ann Fanshawe's memoirs ( British Library Add MS 41161) indicate. The families' relationship is reflected in overlaps in content between the recipes in the two volumes, notably the highly unusual early recipe for ice cream at MS.8903, f.9. This is closely related to the famous ice cream recipe at MS.7113, f.158r, and appears to date to before the first English printed ice cream recipe in Mrs. Mary Eale's Receipts (London 1718).

The recipes are undated but the majority are written in a single fair hand dating from the mid to late 17th century, with additional recipes added or inserted in a wide variety of hands dating to around the mid 18th century. There is a clue to dating in the record of butter salting days for June-November 1662 entered at ff.4-5. Given that part of the butter salting record is inserted into gaps in the fair hand recipe text, it seems likely that the former was added into the volume after or at the same time as the initial recipes were entered.

There is a list of apothecary's weights and measures on the inside front cover.

The recipes are arranged as follows:

In the original hand:
Creams, syllabubs, cream cheeses, ff.5-19
Preserves, dried fruits, syrups, ff.24-36
Wines and ales, ff.37-41
Fish, meat, poultry, game, ff.43-57 (including recipes in later hands at ff.55-57)
Medicinal recipes, ff.58-69 (including recipes in later hands throughout)
Pickles, ff.70-71

In mixed later hands:
Medicinal recipes (interpersed with a few culinary recipes), ff.72-83
Culinary recipes (interpersed with a few medicinal recipes), ff.84-106

The volume does not contain an integral index or contents list. We are grateful to Gwenneth Heyking of the Herb Society for transcribing the recipe titles as follows:

f.5 A Creame Sillibub
f.5 To make Snow of Green Apples
f.5 To Make a Foole
f.6 Malbury A Sack Possett
f.6 A Custard
f.6 A Leamon Creame
f.6 A White Wine Creame
f.6 A Brown Bread Creame
f.7 Blank
f.8 Mrs Risden Harts Horne Jelley
f.8 A Sillibub
f.8 A Sillibub
f.9 Calves foot Gelley
f.9 The Ice Creame
f.9 The Blanche Creame
f.9 The Steeple Creame
f.9 Butter-milk Curds
f.9 The Quince Creame
f.9 Almon Creame
f.10 Mrs Fountain The Imperiall Creame
f.10 A Creame Cheese to be made at the hottest time of the year to keep all the winter
f.10 A Cream Cheese
f.10 Mrs Fountaines Cheese Cakes
f.10 The Froth Creame
f.10 A Leamon Creame
f.10 The Clouted Creame
f.10 The Spanish Creame
f.11 To make the Clodding Cream
f.11 A Cold Posset
f.11 A Sack Creame
f.11 To Make Egge Creame
f.11 To Make Fresh Cheese
f.11 To Make Almon Butter Gelley
f.11 To Make Almon Creame
f.11 The Orrange Foole
f.12 To Make Orrang Creame
f.13 Mrs Egerton Almon Butter
f.13 Very Good Cheese Cakes
f.13 A Buttermilk Creame
f.13 A Thick Creame Cheese
f.13 An Almon Custard
f.14 Almon Butter made with Milke
f.14 A Creame Cheese
f.14 A Codling Creame
f.14 To Make a Posset without Milk
f.14 Almon Butter Best Way
f.15 Lady Jacob Cheese Cake
f.15 To Make Leach
f.15 A Pretty Dish of Creame
f.15 A Lemon Sillibub
f.15 The Cabbage Creame
f.16 Mrs Malbery The Angelot Cheese
f.16 A Creame Cheese
f.16 A Cold Creame
f.16 Almond Butter
f.16 A Trifle
f.16 Junkets
f.16 Curds and Creame another way
f.17 A Creame Cheese
f.17 A Cheese
f.17 The White Custard
f.17 To Make Cheese Cakes without Curds
f.17 To Make Fresh Cheese without Runnet
f.17 A Creame Cheese
f.18 A Creame Posset the best way
f.18 A Whipt Sillibub
f.18 The Cheife Leamon Cream
f.19 Cleare Cakes of Orranges
ff.20-23 Blank
f.24 To dry Cherries
f.24 To preserve Barberries
f.24 To dry Barberries
f.24 To Dry Aprecox
f.24 To Candy any sorts of flowers for sallets
f.24 To preserve the Morrella Cherrie
f.25 The Flech of Aprecox
f.25 The Flech of white Quinces
f.25 To preserve the Kentish Cherrie in Gelley
f.25 To Dry any fruit wihout etc
f.26 To Candy Grapes or Gooseberris after you have preserved them
f.26 To Make Suger Plates of any Cullor
f.26 To make Jumballs or Cakes
f.26 Orrange Waffers
f.26 Apricock Past
f.26 Past of Green Nectrines
f.26 To keep Fruit as Damsons and Grapes fresh till Xmas
f.27 To Dry Damsons or any other plumbs to look as blew as from the tree
f.28 Sweet water to burn
f.28 Marmalet of Quince White
f.28 Preserved Grapes
f.28 To preserve Walnuts white
f.28 To preserve Walnuts Black
f.29 Clear Cakes of Quince
f.29 To dry Black pear Plumbs
f.29 Clear Cakes of Apricox
f.30 Cleare Cakes of Rasberries
f.30 Sirrup of Clove gilliflowers
f.30 Sirrup of Corrall
f.30 To make sirrup of Gilliflowers with Leamon
f.31 An aproved Sirrup for the Spleen
f.32 To make Sirrup of Elderberries
f.32 Sirrup of Elder
f.32 To make Sirup of Saffron
f.32 Lady Scarbrough To preserve Grapes
f.32 To Preserve Grapes
f.32 A Sort of Rasbury Cakes
f.32 To Dry Peaches
f.33 To preserve Kentish or golden pippen
f.33 To Make Fruit Biskit
f.33 To Dry Plumbs
f.33 Clear Cakes of Rasberries
f.33 To Dry Apricox
f.33 To Make Leamon or Cytorn [citron] Jelley
f.33 Apricox Marmalet
f.33 Kentish Chery Marmalet
f.34 To dry Cherries
f.34 To Preserve the Clear Plumb or any
f.34 Red Quince Marmalet
f.34 To preserve Quince whole red
f.34 Orrange or Leamon Cakes
f.34 Conserve of Red Roses
f.35 To make white Quince Marmalet
f.35 To preserve Green Apricox
f.35 To preserve Rasberries
f.35 To make Orrange Cakes
f.35 To make Damson Biscuit
f.35 To make Dutch Cakes
f.36 Cleare Cakes of white Curran
f.36 To make Orrange Cakes
f.36 Cleare Cakes of white Pear-plumbs
f.36 To preserve Goosberries Dryed
f.36 To keepe Walnuts Fresh or moyst all Winter
f.37 Leamon Ade to be drunk in Summer (margin: LC)
f.37 Rasbury Wine
f.37 Black Cherry Brandie
f.37 Rasbery Brandie
f.38 Rasberrie Wine
f.38 To make Gilliflower Cowslip or Rasberrie Wine
f.39 To preserve Cytorns [citrons]
f.39 Cowslip Wine
f.39 Apricock Wine
f.40 A Raison Wine
f.40 Leamon A[…]
f.40 Cock Ale
f.40 The White Mead
f.40 Cowslip Wine
f.41 To make a kind of Malt drink Cheshire way
f.41 Cock Ale
f.41 Another Cock Ale
f.42 Blank
f.43 To make Elderberry Wine
f.43 To make Quince Wine
f.43 To Dress a Carp
f.43 To Dresse Pike Tench or Carp
f.44 To boyle a joale of Salmon
f.44 To Stew a Carp
f.44 To Collor Beefe
f.45 To Collor Beefe
f.46 To Collor Veile
f.46 Hanged Beefe
f.46 A Pig Pye
f.46 Sassages
f.46 Sassages another way
f.46 Beefe Mamode
f.47 Sassages another way
f.47 A Good sauce for a Hare
f.47 To Dresse a Pigg
f.47 To Roast a Leg of Mutton to eat cold
f.47 To Roast Oysters
f.48 A Friggacie of Chickens Rabits or Pigions
f.48 Scotch Collops
f.48 To Roast a Shoulder of Mutton
f.48 A Frigacie of Cold Roast Beefe
f.48 Stewd Beefe
f.49 To souce all kind of foule
f.49 To Dresse a Loyne of Mutton
f.49 An Ele Pye
f.49 To Dry Neats Tongues
f.49 To souce a Pigg
f.49 A French Pottage
f.49 A Goose to Eat Cold
f.50 To Roast a Sholder of Mutton In Blood
f.50 Beefe Alamode to eat Cold
f.50 To Dresse a pike
f.51 To Roast a Pike
f.51 To Roast a Goose after the Cheshire way
f.51 To Roast a Capon with Oystors
f.51 The Kings Pease Pottage
f.51 To Boyle a Carp
f.51 To Boyle a Codds Head
f.52 To Stew a Leg of Beefe
f.52 To Make a Friggacie
f.52 To Stew a Carp
f.52 A Haggis Pudding
f.52 How to Bake Venison or Beefe in potts to keep all the yeare
f.52 To Boyle a Brest of Mutton
f.53 To Boyle Mutton
f.53 A Couple of Carps in Crafish
f.53 How to Bake a Swan in a Pie
f.53 To Bake a Rump of Beefe
f.53 A Pudding of a Leg of Mutton
f.54 To dress a Lambs head
f.54 To Stew a Calves Head
f.54 A Broth For a Consumption
f.55 To Make Pole Bisket
f.55 To dresse mushroome hot or a Friggasie of mushrooms
f.55 To Fry Oysters
f.56 To make Cheesecakes
f.56 To make a Devonshire white Pot
f.56 To stew Salary for boyld Fowls
f.56 To make Apricock fritters
f.57 To Dry Bacon or Beefe
f.57 To make Gooseberry Vinegar
f.57 To make a Trifle
f.57 A Crust for fruit or sweet meat Tarts
f.58 To make hair grow where it is bare
f.58 Soveraigne Medicine for the shortness of Breath and purseness
f.58 For A Consumption Cough
f.58 Cynomon Water
f.58 A Water to Clear a Sunburnd face
f.58 To make Cherry water
f.59 Milk-water against a Consumption
f.59 Dyet Drink
f.59 Good Whea to drink in the summer
f.60 The Jesuits dropps
f.60 The Virtues of the Jesuits drops
f.60 The Virgins Milke
f.60 Almony Milk to unstop the Liver or the Spline
f.61 Spirit of Clary
f.61 Orrange Water
f.61 The small Sufitt Water
f.61 Treacle Water
f.62 Cynomon Water
f.62 Spirit of Cytorns [citrons]
f.62 Almon Milk
f.62 Almon Milk a second way
f.62 A precious Cordial to be made in May June etc
f.63 Lemon Water
f.63 A Sweet Water
f.63 A Sweet Bag
f.64 To perfume Gloves the Spanish way
f.64 How to make poppy Water for a surfeit
f.64 Spirit of Caster
f.64 Simple Water of poppies
f.64 Poppy Water
f.65 The Imperiall Water
f.65 To make Water of Rosasolis to be gatered in the month of June and July
f.66 To make Peaches or apricox in brandy
f.67 To pott Fowles in Jeley
f.68 Blank
f.69 Violet Water
f.70 To Picle Mushrroones
f.70 To pickle Oysters
f.70 To pickland Pursland Stalks
f.70 To Pickle Barberries
f.70 To make Leamon Sallet
f.70 To Pickle Walnuts after the Indian way given by an Indin Marcham
f.70 To Pickle Broome Budds
f.71 To Pickle Ash Keyes
f.71 To Pickle Turnips
f.71 To Pickle Cucumbers Purslin etc
f.71 To Pickle Heartichocks
f.71 To Pickle Cucumbers
f.71 To Pickle Mushroomes
f.72 To make Almon Biskett
f.72 To make Little plume Cakes
f.72 A Esspetiall Medecine to cure all kind of Maladies and griefs
f.73 An excellent Cordiall
f.73 For the Wormes in Stomach or Belly
f.73 For a bruise
f.73 An approved medicine for a Canker
f.73 To break the Stone
f.73 For a Feaver, Wormes or any distemper at first
f.73 A Drinck in a Feaver
f.73 To cure a Feaver at three times Taking
f.73 For the Dropsey
f.73 To staunch bleeding at nose or wound
f.73 For a paine in the head
f.73 For a Loosenes
f.73 For the Faling sickness
f.73 For the same
f.73 Another
f.73 To make Sirrup of Ruberb
f.73 How to make the black Plaister
f.74 To make a Goosbery Tansie
f.74 To make Orange Marmalade
f.74 For a Dropsie or Raw Stomach
f.74 A water for an Ague
f.74 For a Flushing in the face after eating
f.74 A water for an Ague
f.74 A Medicine for the Chollick
f.74 For an Itch
f.74 For a Soare throat
f.74 The Italian Plaister
f.74 An Oyntment for a burn with Gunpowder
f.74 The Golden Searcloth Excellent good for the Sciatica, Gout, Bruises, Stich in the back or sides and Strains
f.75 To stay the bleeding of a wound
f.75 For the Collick
f.75 Lucatellus's Balsome
f.75 There Vertues
f.75 A Purge to Strengthen the liver and against the Dropsy
f.75 The Leaden Plaister
f.76 To preserve fruit all the yeare
f.76 A walnutt water Excellent for many things
f.76 For a palsy a good Oyntment
f.76 A rare medicine for Chest wormes
f.76 For the Stopping of the water
f.76 Another for the Same
f.76 Another
f.76 For the Strangurie or bloody water
f.76 Another
f.76 For the Collick
f.77 The Greene oyntment
f.77 Doctor Stephens Water the same of Doctor Chamberlain with which he did much good and at his death
f.77 The vertues of this Water
f.77 A Water that healeth all manner of feavours att three times takeing
f.77 An Excellent recept for a lin and webb in the Eye
f.78 To make Swallow water
f.78 The vertues
f.78 To make Bacon, Westphalia fashion
f.78 A Receipt for Plague Watter
f.79 A List of the Herbs and other Ingredients for the Plauge watter [T]ribled
f.80 A Certain Cure for a Sore Breast without Pain that Comes by Milk or Ague not by a Blow
f.80 To Stew a Neck of Veall
f.80 To Make a Frigasye
f.80 How to make Scotch Collops
f.80 How to Stew Tripes
f.80 To make a very good pickle for Tongues or Hames of Bacon
f.81 To preserve Oranges whole
f.81 To Pickle Hames the Westphalia way
f.81 Mrs […]s Surfit Water
f.82 To make Orange Marmalade
f.82 To picle Porke
f.83 A Powder for Convulsions
f.83 To Make Burbon Biskett
f.84 To Pickle Mushrooms
f.85 To make Oyle of Charity
f.85 Lord Gower receate to make Elderbery wine
f.85 To make a jam of Cherries
f.86 To preserve Quinches in Syrrop of a pure Cullor
f.86 To make Jelley of Pippins
f.86 To preserve Whole Oranges
f.87 To Dry Aprococks
f.87 To make Pastatia Creame
f.87 To Pickle Colleyflowers
f.87 To make Browne Sawce for Severall sorts of meate as a brest of mutton Ducks Turkeys or what else you f.87 please
f.88 To make Tongs
f.88 The Oyster Loafe
f.88 How to Coller Beefe
f.88 To Green Fruit
f.89 How to Coller Beef
f.89 Goose Bery Wine
f.89 To Stew a Carp
f.90 To Make Good Cheescakes
f.90 To Make Rare Fritters
f.90 How to Dry Neats Tongues
f.91 A Cake
f.91 Scotch Collops
f.91 To Make Rare Peaspottage
f.91 To Do Fish after the Spannish Fashion to keep Good a Year
f.92 A Rare Receipt to Make a Dish Pudding
f.92 To Make Runnet
f.92 The Best way of Making Angelotts
f.92 To Stew a Calves head
f.92 An Excellent Surfett Swatter
f.93 For a Consumption
f.93 Aquamirabilis
f.93 Orange Water
f.93 To Make Purfume to Burn
f.93 For a Cough
f.93 To Make a Spinage Tart
f.93 To make a Custard
f.93 To make a Tansey
f.94 For Incompareable Ale
f.94 For a Boyled Pudding
f.94 Puffs
f.94 To Make Bunns
f.94 To Stew Chickins
f.94 To Make Lemmon Creame
f.95 To Make Sugar Cakes
f.95 To Make Rice Puddings
f.95 To Make Jumballs
f.95 To make Almond Puddings to Bake
f.95 To Make Lemmon Creame
f.95 To Make Orange Marmalett
f.95 To Make Yest to be not Bitter
f.95 For the Meagrim Appoplexy Vertigo Coma
f.95 To make Syrrup with opening Roots
f.96 The Virtue of the Root of the Common Burdock
f.96 To Cure a Burn and heal it without a Scar
f.96 For any Bruise
f.96 To Make Jelley for Carp Tench or any souced fish
f.96 To Dress a Pike
f.96 A Stomake Plaster for a Consumption
f.96 To Pickle Walnutts
f.97 A Jandes Drink
f.97 Orange Cakes
f.97 To make Quinch Jumballs
f.97 To make Aprecock Jumballs
f.97 To Make Fruit Wafers
f.97 To Make Orange or Lemon Wafers
f.98 To Preserve Cucumbers
f.98 For Greening of Fruit
f.98 To Make Read Marmalade in Jelley
f.98 To Candy any tender fruit Raw as Currens or Cherries etc
f.98 To Make Honnycombe Cakes of Sugar
f.98 To make Sugar Wafers
f.99 To Make Little Jumballs of Sugar
f.99 To Make Marmalade of Orange so Esteemed in Court
f.99 To Make Allmond Jumballs
f.99 Past of Pear Plumbs
f.99 Tart of White Pare Plumbs
f.100 Clear Cakes of Quinches
f.100 Clear Cakes of Goosberrys
f.100 Cherry Past
f.100 To Candy Angelico
f.100 To Preserve Quinches in Syrrop of A pure Culler
f.101 To pickle Piggons
f.101 Beef Allamode
f.101 A Dove Goos or Turkey
f.102 To Make Almond Chees Cakes Lady Atkins way
f.102 Lady Osborns Stich water
f.102 To make a Creem Cheese
f.102 To Make Cowslipe wine Mrs Herberts way
f.102 To make mead Mrs Michels way
f.103 To Make Blois bisket
f.103 A Butter'd Bisket
f.103 To Make Carraway Bunns
f.104 To Drie Figgs
f.104 To Make White Marmalade
f.104 To make the Countess of Warwicks Biskets
f.105 To make Almond Bisketts
f.105 To Make White Quince Marmalade Mrs Te[v]ars Way
f.106 To Stew pigeons Mrs Herberts way
f.106 To Stew Rabits Mrs Herberts way
f.106 To make Bath Biskets
f.106 To make Mrs Rowleys wafers
f.106 Miss C S [the recipe deals with cooking a hogs head and pickling it to keep a month]



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64

Last edit over 2 years ago by SHoffelt
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{Mrs} Egerton, Almon Butter { 13 65}

Take a pint of good thick Creame that will hold boyling, then take 6 yolkes of Eggs and beat them & Mingle them with the Creame, then take halfe an handfull of Blanchd Almonds, be at very small Adding non & then a spoonefull of Rosewater, to keep them from Oyleing; then Straine it out on with a little non Milk, & Mingle it with your Eggs & Creame, straine it through a Cushin canvas Strainer & whoa it as you do Choose, tye it & hang it up till it be through =ly cold, then beat as Smooth as you can, & Season it with doublerefined Sugar beat & Sifted, & a Little Rosewater & make it upto your fancie & so serve it up

Very good Chese Cakes

Take 2 gallons of Non Milke put some Rumm ot to it as Soone as it comes from the Cow, Let your Curds be very tender & drayned from the whea, then put to them Some Creame and butter the yolkes of Eggs well beaten; 1 lb of Currance well beaten & plumped, & a Little grated bread Crumes; let it not be too thin, season it with Sugar Nutmegs & a Little salt, & bake them In when best you please

A Buttermilk Creame

Take 2 quart of buttermilk & as much New Milk, & with a wooden Cow milk it warme into the butter milk, & lett it stand a Little, then take it of with a Seummer, & Lay it in A Cive to draine till the Curds be dry, then beat them with Sugar & a Little orrange flower water or Rosewater; & Lay them In your dish In round spoonfuls, & put to them very thick Creame

Last edit over 2 years ago by Heather Soni
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A Thick Creame Cheese to every 5 quarts of stroakings put a quart of Creame about 18 quart will fill your fatt you must heat th e creame before you put it to your stroakings scalding hott; put A quantity of Runet according as it is In strength & when it is com you must Lay a Cheese Cloth In your fatt, w i th a Scuming dish take it up & slip it Into your fatt, not breaking th e Curd nor touching it with your hands at all, as the whea Shrinks from it so and still keeping your fat full and all the Curds put up; you must put a Little salt at twice In it as you fill as more as you can gesse when 1/3 part put In; It will be at Least an hour in making when all is in put a Little Salt on it and turn the Cheese Cloth over it & Lay a very Little weight on it not above 3 or 4 lb & about a hour after turn it into a fresh cloth, & do so every day 2 hours before you go to Bed, & Lay no more weight on it till that [aforth] then take it out of the fatt rub it round with a Little Salt, then take a Cloath & double it & pin it round the Sides in the Cloath, & change it every night & morning untill it have Soft Sinking, or else it will fall flatt; after this dry it as you doe with Winter Cheeses/

An Almon Custard take 2 lb of Amond blancht & beat very fine put to them the yolkes of 10 Eggs & grind them together & Straine them with a quart of Creame Raw; then take half of ate of dates and cut them in small pieces & put them to your Raw Creame, & Season it with Cynomon ginger & Little Rosewater & sugar, & bake it in Coffins of past; when they are baked enough Jel it; if you please you may gild some Almonds and shiek them on the Custard when you Serve them up

Last edit 12 months ago by SHoffelt
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Needs Review

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Almon Butter Made W i th Milke {67} Take a quarter of a lb of The th e best Almonds blancht in cold water & beaten very small in th e beating put in some new Milk -- & Rosewater to them Take then a quart of very thick & sweet Creame & th e yolks of 12 Eggs beaten very well in a Little of th e Creame then put th e rest of th e Creame to them, then put about a quarter of a pint of new Milk to th e Almons, & strainethem Intoth e Creame till there be no strength left In them, then straine th e Creamd Eggs & altogether Into a skellet & set it over a Charcole fire, & stir it till it become to a tender Curd, thenput it Into a strainer & hang it up till all th e whea be run out, then take 6 ounces of th e best double refined suger sifted very fine, & a Little Rosewater & so beat in Into butter w i th a spoone/

A Creame Cheese Take 2 quarts of new Milk & one quart of Creame; put them together w i th 2 spoonfull of Runnet, it must be just so warm as it comes from th e Cow; you must boyle your Creame before w i th some Mace; & take out th e mace, coole it & put it Into your Milk and Creame before th e Runnet goes In; th e yolks of 2 new Laid Eggs beaten very well & strained, & 2 spoonful of fine suger; stir your Creame Milk Runnet Eggs & Suger very well together w i th a seuming dish; W hen your Milk is come strain it Into a wooden boul; then w i th your seuming dish take up your Curds gently with out breaking & Lay them In th e strainer, & when you have drained out all th e whea; then put them Into th e fatt & Lay on a 2 lb weight; & shift it every 2 hours in a dry Cloath, afor 6 hours Lay 4 lb weight on It & as soone as th e whea is well prest out, then rub as much salt as a walnut round about it & let it so Lye for an hour, then wipe it cleane & wrap it twice a day In fresh grasse, & it will be reddy to eat at 4 dayes end/

Last edit 12 months ago by SHoffelt
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Needs Review

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{68} A Codling Creame

Take 20 faire Codlings pill & core them & beat them In a Stone Morter with a pint of Creame, then Straine them Into a dish, & put into them some browne bread Crumbs (& a Little Sack if you Like it) & some Sugar, & dish it up so you may order gooseberries

To Make a Possit without Milk

Take Sack white wine & Ale of each halfe a pint, put thereunto halfe a lb of Sugar; a Nutmeg quartered being before Laid in Rosewater; 2 or 3 blades of Mace; put these into a Silver [Tancord] to boyle in a Kettle of water; when it hath boyled a pretty while have reddy the yolkes & whites of 14 Eggs well beat but not over much for they they will not Curdle, take out your Spice & pour in your Eggs & stir altogether [&] it will rise to a pleasant Curd /

Almon Butter Best way

Take 1 li of the best Almonds, & blanch them the best way & let them Stand there a pretty while; then put them Into a Stone Morter & beat them Exceeding fine, & [vrur] as you beat them Cast a Spoonful of faire water upon them; & so beat them very fine still, & then take them up Into a big dish & thereto put 2 or 3 pottingers of faire water, & let them Stand awhile being covered with a Cloth Lest any dust should come Into them; so done Straine them Into a Bayson of Silver though a Napkin, still keep them Covered then take your Strained Almons out of your Napkin, & put them Into your Morter againe & beat them & put a Pottinger of water to them againe & Straine them to the Rest of your Almon Milk (as you did before; Likewise use them so the So the 3rd time; then take your Allmon Milk & Straine it Into a faire pan, through a Cleane Napkin then take a potting of that Milk & Sett it by & put a pretty quanti =tie of Salt In & so lett it stand; then put the pan of Milk over the fire & let it boyle 2 or 3 times up; then put in your pottinger that hath your Milk In & Salt & let it be there a pretty while after; then take it of the fire & take another Cleane Napkin & let 2 hold it a broad, & with a spoon cast it over your Napkin one Soopnful after another, & let they whea run out, & when it is all Cast on your Napkin; put it together with your Spoone & tye it with a packthreed, & hang it with on a Naile all night that the whea may run out, the next Morning take it Into A dish & work it with a Spoone, & as much searched Sugar as will make it Sweet; & a Little Rosewater to make it tast, & so make up as more the fashion of a quarter dish of Butter as you can, and Lay them on a thin plate /

Last edit about 2 years ago by amytigner
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