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Dear Edith: I just now heard Ma ask Archie to mail you a letter and as I wanted to write you a few lines right away for I can't get time to write much now. Last night I did not get home until almost 7 o'clock and now, that I am in the advanced class, it is usually late every night before I get home, as we had all our own studies to attend to besides doing all the office work and besides doing copying for the college teachers. Well, as Ma tells me, I can only write a few lines because the letter is already full. I am afraid if I get too much wrote, she would send it so I'l proceed to business. If you'l listen well, there is a store in the city having a big clearance sale. They are going to remodel their store and they are selling things so very cheap and they are selling all their tailor made dresses for $3.98. I was in to see them tonight. They are exactly what was selling for 8 and 10 dollars before the holidays so, you may know they are nice, and I have been wearing my black henrietta every day since Ocobert or November and I don't want to ruin it so it can not be made over for good and I feel as if that is cheaper than I could ever get one again & I have two dollars all of my own and I could get the balance or enough more to get one if I want it. What would you do about it if you were me? You don't think I get cheaper by waiting later? Do you know these dresses are fine goods and some trimed with braid? Uncle Frank

Last edit about 1 month ago by Gilb Museum of Arcadia Heritage
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gave me $1.00 for a present when he was here. Wasn't that a nice present? I nearly froze riding on the street car. This winter not fire to speak of so I bought a dollar's worth of tickets last week with my present. That way it only cost five cents a fare, the same as the street car fare. I, [?ke], the train at, [?.00], in the morning at the C.P. Station. But it is much farther to walk. After I get to the city than it would be if I went on the street car but I don't mind that no, [arly], so much as riding on those, [refrigerators]. Edie, address your next letter to me at the College. Just, {Spencer??], Business College Cleveleaand O. And write on a seperate sheet so Ma and the rest will not see anything about it. Ma will give me, fits. I don't dare say a word about such a thing to her. If you addree the way I said, I will get it all right. Please answer as soon as you can for I don't know how long the sale will last. Archie can't wait any longer. Good Bye.

Last edit about 1 month ago by Gilb Museum of Arcadia Heritage
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Newburgh, O. Jan 24, 1898

My dear daughter:

Your welcome letter was received last evening. When Archie came from his work and I had to shed a few tears over it as I always do we were all glad to hear from you and had expected a letter arrival. I am glad to know that you are appreciated so much and that your patient still lives. Tell her I think of her every day and give her my sympathy. When I last wrote to you, Archie was laying very sick and Dr. Hudson was attending him. But I dared not tell you, for you would worry and Archie and Halie would scold me for it. He was confined to his bed nearly a week and was not able to work for some days.

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After he left his bed, his sickness was caused by leaving off about one half of his clothing and dressing up and going to the city on a Saturday night with Robison. He took a dreadfull cold, which almost resulted in pneumonia. Dr. H. told him he too would get sick if he had done as he done on that Saturday night. His last pay was a small amount on account of his sickness and last Saturday and Sunday night, he tried the same experiment over again but, with better results. His sickness was driving the first week of the extreme cold weather. When he was needed so bad on the road, they came after him. I waded to my knees in snow to the Street Car Barnes at five o'clock in the morning to tell them that he was sick.

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Dr. Hudson told him that if he had to be sick, it was a very good time to be for he was escaping a great deal of, [injuries?], that [...] men suffered dreadfully. One died from the cold and many are injured for life. Archie never dressed so warm. I helped to dress him every morning. He wears my stockings and some overcoats. His face has been frosted. He has a good warm bed to sleep in. I give him the, [?] [m....r], every night. Last night, he said he slept so good. I am obliged to get up at 4:00 o'clock every morning to get him of his hour for leaving the Baines, is 5.53. He gets a good warm dinner down on Harvard Street every day at 2:00 o'clock, and breakfast and supper at home and spends his evenings at home. Usually, he will go to the Lodge at night.

Last edit about 1 month ago by Gilb Museum of Arcadia Heritage
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