Journal, 1787 June 18-September 4.

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about a mile; rocky & clear land alternate small trees, some pine, when came to the top of Ball, it with more propriety have been called Bale hill, there being a level tract of poor barren soil, then 2 mile of rich soil, with exceeding large timber trees, as hickery Oak Locust black walnut & two houses on the road, new rattlers when slept at Statlers Log house, poor acomodations _________

June 29 [in left margin]

. . . . . . To Stoney Creek, first three miles easy descent, rich black soil, trees remarkable large & lofty, with a very feew stones, on which was a farm of fine wheat + another not far distant of a light colourd soil good land. then rose a hill 1/2 mile long, then for 6 miles over easy hills, great part thereof stoney united with a good soil, the whole of the west side enriched with towering timber trees, more stately than before had seen + where the land was open on the road, timothy grass + white clover came up spontaneously and luxuriant. At the foot of the mountn is Stoney Creek 80 or 90 yards broad.

____ To Willes Tavern Quamahoning Creek waving land, easy hills. the first five miles rich land & exceeding high timber trees, very thick, the last 4 miles inferior Land + smaller trees 4 farms on the road _ 2 H 20 M _ _

Last edit 10 months ago by rajvis
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Over the last mountain met General Sinclair, president of Congress with his Lady on horse, without a servant, which I take for granted was intended to set a good example to the back settlers & Virgenians to drop parade in travelling, he had been up in search of Iron ore on Laurel hill which if found he had contracted with Congress for a stipulated price for a large run, otherwise the land is little worth. Iron & Salt are the two material things wanting there. the Genl. said he expected to be in Philadelphia in five days.

285 [in right margin]

______ To Fort Legonier, to the foot of Laurel hill 2 [?]miles, good land & good timber trees. Laurel Mountain Rises a S. E course from 34 to 41 degrees at this place [?] miles over, exceeding poor land, vary stoney, small trees & swamp [?], the west side exceeding large angular Stones & much worse than [hornneck?] in Conneticut, but might be made a good road at a small expence; near the foot of the hill 3/4 of a mile better road, then to a fine road, exceeding lofty trees, mostly black walnut, to Ligonier fort 5 miles the fort is situated in a fine bottom 220 by 100 feet with four Bastions. the

Last edit 6 months ago by willirl
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Stockadoes well standing, within 5 or 600 yards on a hill, are ranges of Stores & barracs, where was the old fort & many Redoubts, from thence down the hill to Loyal Hannon creek to John Bridges 3.30 [h.m?]

Here had been a battle with the french. Gen Forbes command, where many were killed Majr Grant + Majr Lewis & others taken Prisoners in a Barn + 100 acres of Land let for 3 years, for buildg. a barn worth 50 £ _ + on this part of the mountn. is where Gen Sinclar + M Bird intend to erect Iron furnaces _ there were 2 farms before we came to Birds_ here passed 6 waggons 5 horses each who help each other occationally carrying from 30 to 35 [# ?] weight had been 3 weeks from Philadelphia _ on the lower part of the mountain some mountain Laurel, the first seen.

_______ To 9-mile Run, (a Creek, three rod wide) to the foot of Channal hill 4 miles, indifferent good land, large trees. Chestnut hill 4 miles over first part but indifferent land, 1 mile exceeding fine land. 7 farms on the road. to Reeds

______ To Hannons town fine timber land 17 farms on the road lately made 3 miles shorter than the old. it was made a borough town in 1773 & courts kept until 1786 but now Pitsbourg is soliciting the removal of the Courts there tho the last Sessions it had been transferred to Greensborough. there are but 13 miserable log houses in Hannons town _______ 31 [in right margin]

Last edit 10 months ago by rajvis
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Snow sometimes 3 feet deep lays above a week, tho Ice continues from 14 to 21 days; there are many springs _ many Sugar Maple trees, they tap them from February to April. dig Ginsang from in July & Augt. when iced red. fine potatoes of [illegible]. Turnips 12th - they have here good kernel coal, waving stratus polishd surface _ plenty of Deer _ Spring generally in April. Winter latter end of January _ detained by rain thunder & lightning two days at freemans tavern, it being sunday M Dodge a prisbtn. parson, going to Illionoise, to report th Country to his congregation in Conneticut, many of whom wished to remove there, or to Kennebeck, having given notice of preaching that day, which he did, both parts of the day, under a beautiful shade of trees 1/2 mile from the town, & gave good prophetic prayers & discourses. though the creeks were up that many could not be passed he had upwards of 200 that attended both services

July 3 [in the left margin]

______ To Powells run, or [illegible word] the first 7 miles. easy hills & waving land good soil, then crossed Turtle Creek which would in Europe be deemed a River, altho it runs in an ~ apparent bottom, yet within one mile crossed it nine time the last had a rising on the west side.

Last edit 4 months ago by Mmaloney
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terminated by a perpendicular rock 10 or 12 feet high with an opening appearantly a Cave, & here was the first apparent rising from the first crossing. dined at Mr. Miers's near 80 Year old almost double, yet active & furnished a good dinner. 12 miles. at 2 miles distance on the West side of Monongahala River, on the banks thereof, was Braddocks defeat, in a bottom. the Faench attacked them from a small rising above the bottom. it is now all in corn, 10 farms on the road. _ Adam Jacobs was raising a roof on his farm, at which above 40 men were employed & had nearly raised it that day _

______ To Pittsbourgh, mounted mother Miers's hill, then for 4 miles easy - ascent, then level, in 7 miles came to Turtle Creek, the same as crossed last stage. came to the side of a hill, having stratas of Slate & freestone laying horizontal, as are all on the otherside of the Allagany mountains, whereas on the otherside quite down to the Sea they are most generally if not totally found in all directions but that of horizontal & frequently perpendicular which gives reason to suppose the interior land remains in its primitave state & that next the Ocean

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