Warren, John. Lectures upon anatomy :.

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Volume containing lecture notes of Harvard Medical School Professor John Warren (1753-1815) beginning on 10 December 1783 for the first course in anatomy he taught. The lectures were delivered in Harvard Yard, probably in Holden Chapel. Warren offers an overview of the history of medicine and anatomy, in addition to lectures devoted to specific parts and functions of the human body, and discussion of dissection. Concerning autopsies, Warren tells his students, "At the first view of dissections, the stomach is apt to turn, but custom wears off such impressions. It is anatomy that directs the knife in the hand of a skilful surgeon, & shews him where he may perform any necessary operation with safety to the patient. It is this which enables the physician to form an accurate knowledge of diseases & open dead bodies with grace, to discover the cause or seat of the disease, & the alteration it may have made in the several parts." "Goldsmith's animated nature," in an unidentified hand appears on the final thirty-nine pages of the volume.

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Season of the year they are seen traveling down in large Armies covering [?] of Land to the Sea to deposit their spawns and then again returning to their retreats after having deposited their shells in holes near the shore -

The Soldier Lobster has the same customs with the addi= tional one that it having traveled from the mountain and deposited it's spawn, being destitute of any shell except on the Nippers it is obliged to seek for the of some other animal which he supplies himself with in such manner as exactly [?] him -

The tortoise has an upper & under shell formed be distict [?] he has but a small head without teeth their place being supplied by two serrated hard ridges, & with this they will [?] more fastened to any substance on which they seize after the head is severed from the body - the blood circulates much as in the foetus in utero - they survive the loss of the brain & head and recover their health, according an Experiment made by Redi the brain was taken out and the Cavity washed clean upon which the Animal shut bis Eyes which he never again opened and unconcernedly marched oft and lived six months after

they live 190 years and are a month in Coition

The turtle is taken when [?] to lay - three or four sorts

The Trunk turtle is larger than the rest its back higher & rounder flesh is rank & not very wholsome

The Loggerhead has a larger head in Proportion than the others the flesh rank and seldom eaten -

The Hawksbill is the least, & has a long & small mouth like a hawksbill, the flesh is poor but the shell valuable, it is raised by fire formed of 13 leaves 8 flat & 5 hollow, beautiful Work

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The Green Turtle is the most valuable, it is extremely easy of Digestion they are brought from Jamaica & other W India Islands it is generally 200 Weigh & sometimes 500 and formerly were large enough according to the ancients for boats. V Diod Sic & Pliny

Supplementary tribes of fishes

Testaceous fishes

For the purpose of forming the shell the animal is furnish= ed with a glutinous fluid which spring from the pores hardens and forms the shell - their colours arise from the substances they are [?] with & they are of all except blue which the Sea water prevents -

They are divided into 1 Univalve or turbinated or 2 bivalve & 3 multivalve

[?]sinated - The Gordon Snail - This [?]

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