Warren, John. Lectures upon anatomy :.

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Volume containing lecture notes of Harvard Medical School Professor John Warren (1753-1815) beginning on 10 December 1783 for the first course in anatomy he taught. The lectures were delivered in Harvard Yard, probably in Holden Chapel. Warren offers an overview of the history of medicine and anatomy, in addition to lectures devoted to specific parts and functions of the human body, and discussion of dissection. Concerning autopsies, Warren tells his students, "At the first view of dissections, the stomach is apt to turn, but custom wears off such impressions. It is anatomy that directs the knife in the hand of a skilful surgeon, & shews him where he may perform any necessary operation with safety to the patient. It is this which enables the physician to form an accurate knowledge of diseases & open dead bodies with grace, to discover the cause or seat of the disease, & the alteration it may have made in the several parts." "Goldsmith's animated nature," in an unidentified hand appears on the final thirty-nine pages of the volume.

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15 Lect. 2d

he told her, she had not miscarried, which the Woman could hardly believe; but imagined, she had, of what they call a false Conception. She went in & about a fortnight after as she was walking along the Room, something came from her, which being sent to the Doctor, he perceived, was the Miscarriage, & the little Placenta being there, he pronounced it Accordingly. Great Caution should be used in prognosticating in these Cases - What Ryshes Membrane of the Blood hence it plainly appears is appears plain from the same Reasoning. He says, the Blood has a Disposition to form Membranes, which is nothing else, than a Collection of the glutinous Parts, very different from the red Fibres in the Body, from drawing a Wire or the like this it, we haveing indeed the Appearance only, for red Fibres are no where found in the Blood - Some from the same Course have said, they have seen Hairs in the Blood, tho' it was only this Gluten with that Resemblance. [?] It is this Gluten, that stops Hemorrhages, stuffing up the Ends of a Vessel, like a Cork, as Petit says.

The Serum has a different Appearance in different Subjects, sometimes as white as Milk - Lower thinks it to be from sudden Mixture of the Chyle with the Blood. Dr. Hunter saw an Instance in a Baker, where the Appearance of the Serum was exactly like a rich Milk or Cream, whilst the Crassimentum was of a good red Colour - He was of Opinion, that this could not be owing to the Chyle mixing with the Blood, as the Man had eat nothing for many Hours before, nor was there any thing with

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16 Lect 2.

Regard to his Health or Diet, from which he could explain it - Blood chemically examined or distilled with the Degree of Animal Heat, rises in some a small Quantity with a Heat of the Degree of boiling water near oz. iij out of oz. viij will come over a mere Phlegm or Water according to Boerhave, & a dry Crust remains behind. If you add still a greater Heat, an oily, bitter or Alkaline Spirit with volatile Oily Salt like that of Hartshorn concreting around the Mouth of the Vessel ascends, then a Yel- low Oil, which becomes more yellow or blackish, & fated as the Distillation is continued; & the Caput mortuum being burnt till it is [?] of its remaining Oil gives a little Virgin Earth. A Condensed Air is in the Blood, there being as much Air in 23[?] of Blood, as will weigh [?], which, when rarefied, will be an 100 Times the Bulk of that Quantity of Blood - Dr. Martin has made his Calculation from Boyle & other Authors as follows

Vi oz. of Water ....... 5 Parts in 6 of Blood Vi oz. of Oil ............1 Part in 15 Vi oz. of Salt .......... 1 Part in 25 Vi oz. of Earth ....... 1 Part in 75 Vi oz. of Air Consol. 1 Part in 20

Besides these a [?] Quantity of Iron is found in the Residuum after [boiling?] the Blood as in most Bodies and [?] then have by some been considered as an [?] Principle of all Bodies

Air is let loose and becomes 30 Times the Bulk of the Blood by boiling or Putrefaction The Residuum or Caput Mortuum remaining in the Still consists of Viscid [Empysumatic?] Oil, & a Virgin Earth, & by burning in an open Fire, the Oil is forced off, leaving ye Earth In a Healthful State of the Body, the Blood is neither Acid

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the [?] In General mixed with Alcohol or strong mineral Acids it is coagulated - as also by [?]sive Motion and may be congealed into an indis[?]able - but by the milder vegetable [?] [?]juice; Vinegar, Lime Juice &c and by alcaline Salts fixed or volatile, especially the last and by Nitre & all neutral Salts it continues or even reafirmes its former Fluidity

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