Walter Deane (1848-1930) Papers; Botanical notebook, 1882. Botany Libraries, Archives of the Gray Herbarium,, Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, Mass.

ReadAboutContentsHelp
Notebook containing a chronological narrative of what Deane did and plants he found on field trips in 1882; localities include Southborough and Cambridge, Mass.; Shelburne, N.H.; and Wells, Me. Includes a list of contacts with addresses at the end of the notebook, with a note about the Winthrop House in Shelbourne, N.H. added by Deane in 1929.

Pages That Need Transcription

Cover (seq. 1)
Blank Page

Cover (seq. 1)

This page is blank

Last edit over 1 year ago by Judy Warnement
(seq. 2)
Needs Review

(seq. 2)

Walter Deane, 29 Brewster St. [Street] Cambridge, Mass. [Massachusetts] My first botanical notes — — 1882 —

Bound March, 1925.

Last edit over 1 year ago by Judy Warnement
Title Page (seq. 3)
Needs Review

Title Page (seq. 3)

W. Deane 29 Brewster St. Apr. 1882

Botanical Notes

Last edit over 1 year ago by Judy Warnement
April 1882. Page 1 (seq. 4)
Needs Review

April 1882. Page 1 (seq. 4)

1882. Apr. 7th Southboro — Mass. I got several specimens of the Symplocarpus foetidus in the hollw back of Mr. Bigelow's which I shall press for the Botanical Gardens — — — — — — — — — Apr. 8th Southboro — Mass. This morning I drove over to Cedar Swamp in Westboo with Rollie Larrabee & George Works. I saw for the first time a swamp of the Cupressus thyroides. The trees seemed to average from 50 to 60 feet in height. I noticed the fibrous shreddy bark and on cutting in to the wood I found it very white.

Last edit over 1 year ago by Judy Warnement
April 1882. Page 2 (seq. 5)
Needs Review

April 1882. Page 2 (seq. 5)

George climbed to the top of a high tree (Cupressus) and cut off about 5 feet of the top from which I have taken specimens were abundant on the branches. The Kalmia latifolia grows in the swamp in abundance and I have put some of the branches with last year's leave to press — I also found the Mitchellia repens with the ripe berries some of which I put to press. This P.M. I successed after working for over an hour with spade and trowel and hands in digging up a Symplocarpus foetidus entire — The rootstock was

about 6 in. long and somewhat over an inch thick and the countless coarse fibrous roots I particularly noticed that the roots near the base of the scape were the youngest and most active, while those at the other end were actually dead. The root stock is ever dying and decaying at one end and advancing at the other — (Gray Lessons in Botany - Page 42). ——————— Apr. 9th Southboro-Mass. I found the Equisetum arvense in a wet sandy ditch by the rail way track near the station. It was only about 2 inches out of the water. This P.M. I found

Last edit over 1 year ago by Judy Warnement
Displaying Page 1 - 5 of 95 in total