MS_26361-1814-1819-ORIGINAL

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* Madison Novr 20th 1814. Preached next Lord's Day after the death of Mrs Judith Taylor.

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Job 19. 21. Have pity upon me, have pity upon me, o ye my friends, for the hand of God hath touched me.

Job was a man of many & sore afflictions. But he was not without friends. Three, [?isting] wished for their solid good sense, & just knowledge in ancient theol ogy, came together by appointment to mourn with him & to comfort him under his afflictions.

What ensued between Job & these condoling friends, it is not necessary for me on this occasion particularly to relate; except in general; that supposing ---- the affliction which he

Last edit 13 days ago by James MacDonald
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underwent, was a certain indication, that he was not a good man, & a gross hypocrite; they severely upbraided him with --- insincerity & hypocricy, & addressed their instructions to him, as one whom they supposed not to be a sincere, true, & faithful servant of the Most High God.

Job readily comprehended in what light his --------friends viewed him, & stood upon his defence. He was not insensible that the hand of God was laid heavily upon him; & that his friends were not comforting him, but were adding to his afflictions by their severe animadversions upon him;

Last edit 13 days ago by James MacDonald
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He knew that in reference to the professed object of their visit, that they had come to be with him in his afflictions to mourn with & comfort him. the the propossed design of mourn ing with & comforting him; he felt the severity of their animadversions upon his [him] as a mere hypocrite, & cried out as in the words of our text; "Have pity upon me, have pity upon me, o ye my friends, for the hand of God hath touched me."

The great point in which he wished for their condolence of him sympathy [?rging] friends was that they should pity him; and that [?} why was because the hand of God had touched him.

He appears not to have betaken himself to his friends, however, rather than to God, for support under his afflic-

Last edit 7 days ago by James MacDonald
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For, to have done so, would have been to have made an arm of flesh his trust, rather than the living God. He knew that his three friends had mistaken his true [?darr], & that they had misjudged concerning his afflictions; that they had judged him to be a mere hypocrite, because he was brought into such lone afflictions. And therefore he says, "Why do ye persecute me as God, & one not satisfied with my flesh? Oh that my words were now written! oh that they were printed in a book! That they were graven with an iron pen & lead, in the rock forever!"

After he had thus earnestly expressed his desire that [??hat] he was about to say might be duly noticed & be had in lasting remembrance; he declares what he had thus earnestly desired might

Last edit 10 days ago by James MacDonald
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be graven with an iron pen & lead, in the rock forever; "I know that my Redeemer liveth, & that he shall stand at the latted day upon the [?]. And though, after my skin, worms destroy this body, yet in my flesh [?] I see God: [?] I [?] see for myself , & mine eyes [?] behold, & not another: though my veins be consumed within me."

This was what job wished his three friends to notice, & to have in perpetual remembrance; & is far from being the language of a mere hypocrite; it is expressive of the strong hope which he entertained, of his own integrity & uprightness of heart, & of the assurance that he had, that that he should have part in the resurrection of the just .

Job having thus stated to his friends his strong hope of a future state of blessedness, beyond the grave, next tells

Last edit 10 days ago by James MacDonald
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