MF1323.1197 Reel 38_0489

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Part of Notes California H379 J625

G. M. Hanson San Francisco, Cal Feb 14, '62 Entd

Submits report of the disaster by flood on the Klamath Reservation, his purchase of Smiths River Valley enc. map of the same and deeds therefor, accompanied by remarks rel. to its peculiar advantages — removal of a portion of the Indians thereto &c

Abstract 624

Respectfully referred for the Report to Secretary of the Interior April 9, 1862

File Land For Map See Draught ns No 624

[stamp] RECEIVED AT THE Mar 21 186 INDIAN BUREAU

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Office of Indian Affairs Northern District California San Francisco Feby 14th 1862

Hon. Wm P. Dole Comr. Ind. Affs. Washington

Sir Having just returned from a visit to Klamath, the Northwestern Indian Reservation, in this State, I hasten this special report, concerning the disastrous flood at that place; and the action I have taken in relation to losses, and the necessary changes attendant upon the same.

On my arrival at that place, on the 15th of Janry, I found fields of bare Cobble Stone, on one side, and Sand; 3 feet deep on the other, which had taken the place of nearly every acre of arable land on the Reservation, thereby totally destroying every hope of any success in the future.

Every pannel of fencing, every Indian village, and every Government building, (over 30) except a barn;

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including the Mill, and Threshing Machine, together with all the harvested crops, and stores belonging to the Service. The Farming, and Blacksmiths tools, Hogs, Fowls, and part of the Cattle, all swept into the Pacific Ocean; an account of which, will appear more fully in the property returns at the end of the quarter.

in this condition was the Klamath Reservation, and no blame can be attached to those who located it there, for the "oldest inhabitant" among the Indians had never before witnessed such a flood.

The Employees, and Indians, being almost destitute of food and shelter, no time was to be lost in their immediate removal.

Having previously traveled throughout every part of the Northern District, and made necessary inquiries in regard to suitable locations for Indian farms, where they would be most secluded from white settlements, and after fully satisfying myself that no such place can be now found on Government land, in the whole State, for every valley is occupied

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by white settlers, and among all of those, "Smith River Valley", from all accounts, presented the greatest advantages, hence, I visited that place, and finding it impregnable to floods, furnished with an abundance of fine timber, and living springs, about 20 well improved farms, under excellent fence, with dwelling houses, Barns &c, two valuable Water Mills, (flour, and Saw) young orchards, numbering several thousand trees, and about 3000 more in nurseries, — upon inquiry I found the few settlers not only willing, but very anxious to sell to the Government at any price they could get, and at what I consider a very low rate. Nearly all their farms are under mortgages, and they are anxious to have them released, so that they can go to the new mines, from which they hear such fabulous accounts of gold.

This valley is in the extreme N. West corner of the State, completely encompassed by ranges of mountains, on the East and North, and the Pacific Ocean on the South, with an entrance at the South east end, in the direction of

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Crescent City which place, when first laid out, was expected to be the port of entry to Northern California, but failing in that, the place has gone down, and consequently every person wishes to sell, and leave.

There are no places for white people to settle within 20, or 30 miles, East, or 50 miles North, consequently deeming it an auspicious opportunity, I have finally succeeded in negociating a purchase of all the arrable land in the valley, on the North side of the River, about 5000 acres in all, and nearly one half of it under excellent fence, and in a state of high cultivation.

This negociation on the part of the U.S., of course is subject to approval, or refusal, hence I submit the same to you, for your recommendation or otherwise, as you may deem proper and right.

In view however of the ratification of the purchase, I have used the precaution of securing Deeds, from all, but 2 or 3 persons, who were absent at that time, those deeds, are in the hands of responsible persons, to be passed over to the U.S. for record, when the money is paid, and the

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