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and he being unfortunate in getting the herds across the mountains, entertains the idea of making the government pay for them, which would certainly be a gratifying circumstance, if government was so disposed; especially as the loss was not a small one. But enough of this; and here allow me to say, I am fully aware that matters of this kind are less pleasant, than to speak of good deeds, and purposes, and certainly Mr. Hanson, in some appointments and instructions, has pleased me much.

But I am sorry to say, I consider Mr. Hanson remiss in duty, as since he qualified, he has not visited one of his Reservations, while Wentworth has made two or three to each of his. In hunting his predecessor, he made a flying call at each of his Reservations, but of course was not in a proper condition, or position, to say, or do much, but hastened on in quest of Dribilbus [Dreibelbis]; (in no enviable mood, as he frankly admits,) to obtain a surrender due to the victor. This he pursued to the bitter end, at the expense of a heavy journey, long chase, and some money. Since which

Last edit about 2 months ago by Fudgy
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time he pleads no money, (of account) till November. Some ten days after the receipt of the November appropriation, I saw him at Yuba City, and he promised to meet me at San Francisco within six or eight days, at most, to accompany me to Humbolt.

Not coming, I wrote him of the pressing necessity, twice; but received no reply. Wentworth, twice, telegraphed for him, and at length he appeared, and assisted as he was wanted to assist, in the division of the goods, and now (or a day or two since,) he started to visit his Reserves. (Lawing for a bill of Divorce, is said to have detained him.)

I also send you Mr. Rectors letter; addressed to me while in our City; and in relation to the treaty stipulation with those Indians, I regard it important, as they are somewhat numerous, really brave, and grossly trespassed upon, as the miners are flocking thither by thousands; the mines proving very rich. Promptness, may prevent disaster or heavy loss of blood or treasure. As to the fruit trees knowing little I can say nothing except

Last edit about 2 months ago by Fudgy
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that the poor Indians are excessively fond of fruit, and if this was promised them, as I am told it was, by Nesmith, while Superintendent, they would hardly have continued hopeful, or quiet, long, without the fulfilment. I had several interviews with Mr. Rector, and was glad for reasons I will explain on seeing you. Suffice it now to say, you reposed confidence in me, and I strenthened confidence in you. I have known Mr. Rector for fifteen years. He is a man of sense, character, and substance, and, not only popular but in my judgment, admirable qualified for the post he fills. If that little niche taken out of his Superintendency, can, properly be placed back, as I learned the agent placed there at the instance, or by the request of Senator Nesmith, wishes to be transfered to Oregon, and Rector, engages to retain him. I am pursuded [persuaded] it would be a salutary movement, for as it now is, it seems singularly out of joint, and really leads to inconvenience both to whites & Indians as Mr. Kendall is out of the line of march

Last edit about 2 months ago by Fudgy
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and quite away from all convenient access, to both parties, who living and mingling together have frequent occasion to refer matters to the Superintendent.

Since my return from the north, the winter Storms have been so continuous, and of such unparalleled severity, I have been obliged to confine my labors to correspondance, and visits nearer home, and such has been the storm and gloom attendant upon it that it was as well; except I had paid a visit to Washington Territory, with a view to the reconciliation of matters there. It is eminently proper some one should undertake a reconciliation of differences there. Mr. Kendall's friends claim that he is a man of strict integrity and of indomitable energy, but admit he was a little elated and rash in entering upon the charge of his duties while his enemies and they are not few load him with hateful and most opprobrious epithets. I wish for many reasons he had Hansens softer & milder manners. How much easier for mankind to condemn, than to do right. I much want to visit the north before

Last edit about 2 months ago by Fudgy
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making my report, and going to Washington. In my report, I shall recommend to abridge expense, and to have a uniform law throughout, which will work easier, and more effectively. Sir: I hope you will be able to approve and recommend the plan.

Heartily wishing you every success, I am, Sir, with great respect, Your Obt. Sevt. E. White Spl Agt

Last edit about 2 months ago by Fudgy
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