Letter from George Gilpin Robinson to Rachel Gilpin Robinson

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Letter written by George Gilpin Robinson to his mother, Rachel Gilpin Robinson. The letter discusses Robinson's decision not to smuggle slaves.

This is a scanned version of the original image in Special Collections and Archives at Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vt.



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Stamped: Rokeby Museum Ferrisburgh, Vermont

Savannah Jany. 2nd 1847 Dear Mother I arrived here last night, after a very pleasant passage of four days and as many nights. found Floyd in good health, his cough nearly gone. This is a very pleasant city, and I hope to enjoy myself in it greatly- he says I must board with him at the Pulaski. I shall not commence work until monday; my business then will be receiving and deliver ing Cotton. It is so warm here as to make it very uncomfortable standing in the sunshine, the inhabitants complain that it is warmer than usual for the season. Floyd comes in and tells me to remember him to all of you and say that he is quite well. I did not see much of the country coming out here, as I passed nearly all the cities in the night; the[loss] we stopped in Baltimore two hours by day-light yet I happened to have a slight headache and therefore did not run about any. I enjoyed myself exceedingly in New York - Grand-mother is certainly a very nice old lady and Bobby is as interesting as ever; Lucy was very kind and rigged out my handkerchiefs in great shape. There were two negroes found yesterday here, secreted on board a British Brig about sailing for home

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the negroes were scared (of course) and the whole crew of the vessel put in the penetentiary [sic] for a long time, if not for life. This is but another proof of the folly of attempting to run off slaves form the South, and I have made up my mind not to undertake it. I do not think that Argus was put into my trunk as it us nowhere to be found - I hope none of my friends will be so inconsiderate as to send me any AntiSlavery papers. Lloyd says he wrote to Ann last Sunday.. I saw nothing of uncle Charles on my Route, but I saw our little R.W. Griswold in Philadelphia and that was almost as _bad_. Try to forgive me for writing such a looking letter, for I am in a great hurry and cannot find a good pen. Give my best love to all the family and to my friends in general. Tell Father not to hurt himself with work, and do try to take care of thyself in that particular. I am very thankful to the one who put those nuts in My trunk whoever it was - I guess Lloyd and myself will have great times _breaking_ them. Please say to George Reynolds that I will write him soon and that I could find not violin music in New York that was good. Do not fail to have some of the family answer this soon. It is high time this thing was brought to a close - so farewell for the present,

Thy Affectionate son G.G. Robinson

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[On envelope]

[stamp] Savannah Jan 2 GEO Received 10 am 11th [stamp] 10 Answer

Rachel Robinson Received 1st am 11th North Ferrisburg Ans[--]d 2 am 4th |47.1 Vermont

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