Letter from Ann Stevens, dated 1861-01-20

ReadAboutContentsHelp

Pages That Need Transcription

p.
Needs Review

p.

Have heard Freeman T. is married. Do they live at home? They expect the Foster girls and Charley Templeton, but they have not yet come, and they do not know what to make of it. Have not seen Susan since I saw thee. Week ago yeterday we went to a Mr. Wheeler's, come of [Fannie's?] relations. They are real good folks, old-fashioned as you please. They came after us and brought us home, and seemed very much pleased with our visit. Feeling rather honored by "The Faculty". Do say something about Uncle T.s family, do not know how they can get along with out P. [Sicle?]. - My dear mother, I do not remember a time during my choldhoods stubborness or my more matured faults, when thee has not treated me with all the kindness, all and more love than could possibly have been deserved. The time never was when "under haste" was shown. - Farewell dear mother

With love to all. Thy Loving Daughter

Ann.

[page break]

Morrisville, Vt. 1 [m?] 20, 1861.

My dear Mother:

I was very glad to receive thy and Willies letters, and to hear of thy safe arrival home. Mrs. Blanchard, Susann Mrs. Gleed and all were so sorry thee did not come here. I shall always regret my going to Stowe when I did, although I had a very pleasant time, indeed, yetI should so much rather have seen thee here, yet I hope I shall not stay here another year without thy visiting me. I think Aunt Mary seemed more happy than she has this great while before. How quiet and still they live. I liked it very well for the time I stayed there but should not wish to live so now. I presume that some time such a still asylum from the world [deleted]will[/deleted] would be a most acceptable retreat from the noise and bustle, and hurry of living in

Last edit about 1 year ago by catslover
p.
Needs Review

p.

a more active sphere of existence. But "not yet, not yet," as the traveller said to the two angels of Death, in St. Peter's. How soon that time may arrive, I do not know. Sometimes I think the more humble the sphere the happier is the person, at least their influence if it is for evil will be less hurtful. He, "who lived happy, died happy," fulfilled the mission of life, for "he loved and served his God" Yet it does not necessarily follow that one "large of understanding" may not consecrate his greater powers to the same happy service. Then the greater the knowledge and powers of mind, the greater will be the beneficial results of [their?] devine use, to which they are given. I think of the condemnation of the [hider?] of the one talent, of his shame when reproved by the giver of it, and dare not stop in the attempt of putting the part of one I have at [legal?] interest. I cannot yet give up the idea of attendng

[page break

school at some higher Institution than this. It would seem very desirable that I should go next Fall. For I shall be old enough then, to say the least. Yet we do not know what changes the intervening time may bring.

James will be at home this week. There will be great rejoicings then I suppose. Shall be very glad to see him, and think he will be glad to be at home again. Received a letter Arthur, the other day; if it were not a twelve [moses?], I would send it, for it is a pretty strange letter I call it. I think he is a very strange man, and do not know what to make of him. Think something must have weakened his faculties, but do not know what. I have not answered it, and do not know as I shall, to tell the truth. I have gotten about sick of writing to the boys. It does not pay very well in the end. Though for a while it is pleasant enough to hear from them, but generally the end is unpleasant.

Last edit about 1 year ago by catslover
Displaying all 2 Page