Letter from Mary, dated 1861-06-04

ReadAboutContentsHelp

Pages That Need Transcription

p.
Needs Review

p.

Medford. 6th, mo. 4th. 1861. My own dear mother — Willie and all — I find but little to make an interesting letter— but know you will be glad to hear how Tim is drifting this child along. Last seventh day I sent a letter to Horace giving an account of my [viost?] to the Drs Perkins— presume you have seen it— so shall not need to respect [can?] account of the precedings there— Am taking the medicine faithfully— and have strong hopes it is just what I need— it is certainly having great effect upon me some way— my stomach is so back— and I am so bad all over suppose I must'nt expect to get well in a day— my head feels clear— and my feet trouble me with burning more than being cold, since taking the medicine, so it seems my blood has taken a start in the right direction. 4th, day morning. A bright lovely day— and the first one that I can say I realy am feeling better since taking the new medicine— it has made me feel miserable enough— so weak and sort of sickish all over— Melinda was here yesterday and said twas having just the desired effect— if it was going to help me in the end must expect to feel badly at first, while it was plowing up the foul weeds of disease. It seems very soothing— no appetite yet— and can eat only light [baler's] bread— but am very thankful to eat that and not have it distress me. Am feeling so comfortable today, feel very much encouraged— but willing to trust all to the care of One who knows what is best for me. Am stopping this week at Charles Caldwell's— he came home today with the comforting assurance there was a letter for Mary L. Pertnam at the P.O. wanted to know if that was my name— so shall have to wait till night— if I can. How earnestly I hope it will tell me you are all well— hope poor little Howard's ear has got over aching— love to him and the rest over the ridge— if you have a chance— you

Last edit 5 months ago by JBerry
p.
Complete

p.

can tell them how I get along— so shall not need to write again till first-day.

Lydia Maria Child and husband spent the winter with Miss. Osgood who lives a few doors from here— M. Caldwell done their washing for them— she says L. M. was realy untidy about her person— would wear her clothes a good while— and get them very dirty— said to see her in the street any one would think she was an ordinary irish woman— she wore no hoops and her dresses quite short— says her whole sympathies are enlisted for the slave— [some?] one told her we should have no more warm south wind now the south had seceded— she thot we could get along without a breeze which comes only from a land of oppression. Her husband is a nicely educated man— Miss. Osgood had him for tutor in some of the languages during the winter. Mother, [Thee?] remembers that beautiful poem— "He doeth All Things well"— the writer lives here in town. I saw her the other day— she is a fine looking woman— her name is Cummings— her husband teaches the high school here— and has for nearly fifteen years. Tis hardly likely I shall be well enough to come home in less than two weeks— can tell better after seeing the Dr. again— how I hope you are all well— accept a great deal of love from your affectionate Mary.

Last edit 5 months ago by JBerry
Displaying all 2 Page