Letter from Rachel B. Stevens, dated 1862-01-05

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old Betty Brown - which almost spoiled J's visit - they returned this P.M. -

He informs that F. [Glied's?] widow has a young child - poor afflicted woman how my heart has ached for her - Philip & wife live with her - Edwina Morris, was married to a [Calkins?] of Waterbury on new years day - James, & a cousin of his, C's stood up with them - James weighs 170. He does not think [McIlluhs?] is near equal to A.J.B. in the school - Andrew & Abby are in Barre - H. & Mary went to see them last week; Abby has been very sick again & is now very feeble - they have a very lovely little boy - Andrew take a great deal of care of him - they did not learn any thing of their future plans -

Mary & Howard came home with us after meeting - Mary is pretty comfortable but far from well & strong - she uses the spring water this winter - & does not feel near as well without it - Ann wrote [Lars?] first day - but I supposes he writes as often to thee - she is now in school again I suppose - hope she may get great good from this long devotion to books - but I sometimes fear she will not - any way she [ingages?] it as she goes along - & is sure of so much good.

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East Montpelier 5th of 1st mo 1862

My dear Wm.

Thy cheerful & very acceptable letter was duely received - also Henry's, for which I am grateful - I am sorry thy box does not arrive - fear if it reaches thee in safety thy brown bread will be spoiled & frozen as well as the cheese - but we did as well as we could & so must leave it - I do not feel as anxious as I should if thee was suffering for the comforts of ife - Aunt P. & cousin Fanny say they should have been glad to put in something, if they had known we were sending - I fear thee is not yet as careful of thyself as thee ought to be - Why does thee not mention thy wrist -

Mason & Slidell I suppose are on their way again - I do not pretend to know much about public affairs, but

[in left margin:]

Give my respects to Henry - I will endeavour to answer his good letter before long - I do not know how far apart your residences are. I should like to - I hope thee will find time to write us good long letters telling all particulars about thyself and the war, as far as thee can - I can not see what possible good you are all doing there - Fare well my dear boy Mayst thou be preserved from evil & all harm is the prayer of thy loving Mother

Last edit 6 months ago by catslover
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there are many things that I can not understand - they are so mysterious - among other things is Freemont's case - & why this vast army of the Potomac are lying still this winter, when they can not go south in summer - it seems to me that the whole country must be ruined - - sickness is cutting off many more than the sword - all is [underline]sad sad[/underline]-

Our [lectures?] are coming off from week to week very finely, Dr. Richardson gave us a capital one last fifth day evening - it was really practical & excellent - the best there has been I think - - the attendance, however, was not as large as usual, on account of the new years ball at Hammets the night before - Our remnant of the new years gatheirng met according to rotation at J.G.P.'s we had as pleasant a time as we could expect - Charles & Howard were all the young folks - both of them were rather sorry they

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left their school - I hardly think however that Charley will go much longer - he begins to think there is not much profit in it - I am very sorry, for he is no hand, thee knows, to study of home - he says he don't know but he had better help Thomas get up wood. T's eyes have been so weak he has not [learned?] a great deal as yet - but they are getting better we hope - - I think thee may safely write to Jane - I believe she will get it - I miss her pleasant quiet little ways very much, but do not really need her work at present - thee had better write to her [underline]not[/underline] on the back of mine, as we each wish to keep our letters -

Uncle & aunt A have been home a week we get along nicely - I think he will buy another place - perhaps in the east village.

James came home 6th day night - on a visit - the weather has been cold but pleasant - three of them came down - but the one that found [horse?] got one about like

Last edit 6 months ago by catslover
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[(1-5-1862)]

My dear boy

William Dean had this letter in his pocket yesterday intending to put it in the office as he came to meeting, but lacked a stamp - which seemed fortunate as I took it from his hand - I trust thee will give it a candid prayerful

Last edit 6 months ago by catslover
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