European Journal, Volume 2

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PC_2050_Green_1859_01

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Last edit 3 months ago by Joy Curtiss
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March 19th 1839 This morning we awoke in first of Luxor, the stopping point of pilgrims to acient Thebes, of which last it in fact constitutes part and parcel without being told it were imposible to divine that the sacred precints of the hundred gated city of the Nile are around us. Everything indicates the common routine of commonor Egyptian life: being moved directly under the bank it was impossible to discern the modern town but the other side was as flat and uninteresting as could well be imagined with the hills containing the tombs of the ancient necropoles rising up in the background. After breakfast ordered over to the [offsite alone] and after the necessary preliminary bristle mounted our dimunutive donkeys and started. Half an hour brought us under the shadow of the Colossi of the the plain, "the vocal Memnon" and another of liken note, which looked in the distance like two Cyclopean sentinels "sitting on post" to gaurd the approach to the ruins beyond; but I'm both to say that in ths case the old saw that "distance lends enchatment to the view" holds good. They have been so defaced by the hand of violence and the no less ruthless touch of that old vandal Time, as to leave scarcely a carricature of the "human face divine."

Last edit 2 months ago by DeSterrennacht
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2. Having inspected to our heart's content the giganantie proportions of this miracle working stature, which it is needless to add modern research and incredulity have satisficatorily fathomed, we continued on to the ruins of Medinet Habu, where are seen the eveidences of two eras seperated by long centuries from each other, viz, the temples of old Egyptian mythology mossy in all their parts and grand in all their proportions, an architecture which alone of all the orders seems to mock the mutations of time and to smile at the malevolence of man: and around these and almost excluding them from observation are the wood cottages of a period reaching half way down to our own time. What a contrast! We passed a couple of hours inthe great and Small temples of Medinet Habu, viewing with wonder the immensity of the work, and then remounting our jackasses set off for the the Palace of Rameses, or as it is generally known the Remesseum or Memorium, which is if anything even more wonderful than the temples themselves. Here prostrate upon its face is the great Colossi the largest statue that we have any mention of as cut out of single block of stone. Of this immense palace the columnns remain almost entire, the capitals being for the most part of the inverted bell order, the favorite one of the Egyptians.

Last edit 2 months ago by DeSterrennacht
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Afterwards we proceeded up the side of the mountain to examine the tombs of the principal note but during to the excesive heat contented ourselves with simply inspecting two of the two thousand or more in sight, viz, those of [Amenophis] and a private one marked 35: both are cut out the solid rock la soft white limestone and are covered with pictures and hieroglyphies. They both run back a considerable distance, the last about [15-0] yards with another passage running at right angles. About 4 o'clock we got back to our boat and in a cold lunch and a hot dinner soon consoled ourselves for all the labor, heat and fatigue. of the morning. In the evening returned the visit of a dr. McChesney and a Mr. Knight, wife and daughter from Mississippi: in the latter gentleman found an old acquaintance of my Father.

March 20th

Set off at an early hour for Karnak, where we arrived in about three quarters of an hour afterward. Just before reaching the main ruins passed through a long row of Sphinxes, colossal rams lions ete. all of which were more or less damaged. Terminating these was an immense arrival gateway of the pyramidal shape and the [Roman] time, which led into the smaller temple of Karnak. Once in this I began [rerolling] in my mind whether my guide

Last edit 2 months ago by DeSterrennacht
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4 had not incautiously substituted small for great, for however it may deserve the former appellative in comparasson to its gigantic neighbors, isolated and above it "looms out larger" and no mistake. Some of the stones constituting the roof are at least 30 feet in length with a depth and bredth proportionate. How these were ever raised to their places as also how the numerous obelisks and Colossi of a single block weighing several hundred tons were ever created, has too long puzzled the [ravans?] of modern times for me to attempt to throw any light upon the subject. Certes, they most certainly evince a more accuruate aquaintance with the mechanical powers on the part of their authors than we of the present day are willing to admit. A stone's throw from the minor is the major temple, and great it certainly is in all its parts and just in all prossestions. The statement of Diodorus will convey a faster estimate of its magnitude than all I can say upon the subject. According to that writer its walls were one mile and a half in circuit and twenty five feet in diameter. The walls, as is invariably the case which all that we have seen in the country and which fact constitutes the secret of their continuance and preservation are large at the bottom and smaller at top, approximating the

Last edit 2 months ago by DeSterrennacht
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