Journal of Lieutenant Banks Arendell

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PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_001

PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_001

Banks Arendell

#24

Last edit 3 months ago by Rudi
PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_002

PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_002

A tyrant’s bloody sceptre vs. a savior’s holy sepulchre.

Last edit 3 months ago by Rudi
PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_003

PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_003

From Barracks to Battlefield and Back

July 10, 1918. After expecting, and, in a sense, awaiting definite orders to proceed to the port of embarkation, our regiment received information that it would leave on the 14th. Almost immediately after this information spread around, the time of our departure was moved up by twenty-four hours. Days and nights of constant [jocking] worked our last few days at Camp seview, S.C.

[Illegible text]

July 13, at 8 p.m. our train rolled out under sealed orders. Everybody was cheery; some calmly, others loudly so. I smiled even in the face of the personal feelings I had.

July 14 - Red Cross women were very courteous to us and our men, especially at Lynchburg, VA, and Washington, DC. The men

Last edit about 2 months ago by DrSaw
PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_004

PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_004

very appropriately nicknamed the former “Lunchburg”.

July 15 - We pulled into and about immediately out of our nation’s metropolis, bound, we learned, for a short stay at Camp Upton, L.I. [illegible]

July 15-30 - our two weeks’ stay there, we literally ate sand and slaughtered mosquitoes. The renowned Jersey mosquitoes more than do justice to their wide fame. My wife and I saw much of New York City in twenty-four hours.

July 30 - Pursuant to our daily expected and daily delayed orders, we left Upton for our ship. The parting of my wife and me was naturally sad but surprisingly philosophical. The pain I had the love for [illegible] I have will never be totally removed till

Last edit about 2 months ago by DrSaw
PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_005

PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_005

wee are together again. The boat, an English mailer of East and South African fame, [Walner] Castle by name, was quickly loaded. We spent that night in port. We are indeed ourselves very fortunate to be on the same boat with General Bailey and his staff + 438 R.C.

July 31 - Promptly at noon we stamed slowly eastward, picking up the remaining fourteen ships of our convoy as we went along; the giant buildings of the world’s largest city and the impressive Statue of Liberty gradually faded in our rear. It was interesting to see the numerous mosquito boats and seaplanes giving us a safe starting. There we soon left behind as well the large observation balloon that went up at intervals from the stern of an American lookout ship.

Only a few hours outside, my intestines became restless.

Last edit about 2 months ago by DrSaw
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