PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_003

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catslover at Aug 11, 2019 08:41 PM

PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_003

From Barracks to Battlefield and Back

Wednesday We had been a regiment of Infantry for
10 months and had neared [way?] strength more
than once. [deleted]We took[deleted] From the place of our birth
[Camp Jackson?] S.C. we took our handful of men
[inserted]early in May
to Camp Sevier, S.

July 10, 1918. -- After expecting, and,
in a sense, awaiting defiinite orders
to proceed to the port of embarkation,
our regiment[deleted]was inf[deleted] received in
formation that it would leave on
the 14th. Almost immediately after
this information spread around, [deleted]our[deleted]
the time of our departure was moved
up twenty-four hours. Days
and nights of constant packing marked
our last few days at Camp Sevier, S.C.

Cap't [?oles] leg broken.

July 13 - At 8 p.m. our train
pulled out under sealed orders. [deleted]Some[deleted]
Everybody was cheery; some
calmly, others loudly so. I smiled
[inserted]even in the face of[inserted] [deleted]over[deleted] the personal feelings I had.

July 14 - Red Cross women were
very courteous to us and our men,
especially at Lynchburg, Va, and
Washington, DC. The [deleted]boys[deleted] men

PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_003

From Barracks to Battlefield and Back

July 10, 1918. After expecting, and, in a sense, awaiting definite orders to proceed to the port of embarkation, our regiment received information that it would leave on the 14th. Almost immediately after this information spread around, the time of our departure was moved up by twenty-four hours. Days and nights of constant [jocking] worked our last few days at Camp seview, S.C.

[Illegible text]

July 13, at 8 p.m. our train rolled out under sealed orders. Everybody was cheery; some calmly, others loudly so. I smiled even in the face of the personal feelings I had.

July 14 - Red Cross women were very courteous to us and our men, especially at Lynchburg, VA, and Washington, DC. The men