Journal of Lieutenant Banks Arendell

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PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_016

PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_016

Along toward noon [deleted]we[deleted] the fog lifted and we found ourselves in [inserted]the river[inserted] [deleted]a[deleted] channel between [deleted]the summer resort[deleted] New Brighton, the summer resort, and Liverpool, the docking city. We were present with a striking contrast of pleasure on [deleted]last[deleted] [inserted]our[inserted] port side [deleted]and[deleted] with business, strict business, on our starboard. It was buoyant bathers and scenic railways versus eleven miles of docks and dozens of [inserted]camouflaged[inserted] troop ships and freighters. [deleted]Numerous[deleted] American flags flew from the sterns of numerous ones of these ships. I got my first sight of the lock, which I had longed to see for so many years.

In a nutshell, we landed safely. During our whole trip we had not seen a single German submarine. The men, I think were a trifle disappointed that we didn't get a couple of shots at one or two of the much dreaded monsters of the sea. I am firmly convinced that the U-boat captains are in the habit

Last edit 3 months ago by catslover
PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_017

PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_017

of looking after their own skins. They wouldn't have the chance of a snowball if they had attacked us. But there is no telling what those dirty beasts are planning. Their craftiness must never be overlooked. I am thankful for the cause that our [inserted]wise[inserted] Government has not the habit of taking [inserted]on a declining scale[inserted] precautions for the safety of its soldiers. There is no telling what catastrophe such a fault might bring upon our boys who will come over here later.

Reading in papers of how people over here line the streets to bid us Americans a hearty welcome is not a fractional part of what an outburst of enthusiasm we received as we marched through this town [inserted](city)[inserted]. Our American circus parades are not in it. Girls and young women were constantly reaching out their hands to give their "Good-bye Sammy" to our boys. Some of them

Last edit 3 months ago by catslover
PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_018

PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_018

locked arms with the men and followed [deleted]them[deleted] us over every inch of the seven miles out here to our next camp. Many waved American flags as we passed. The older women were present with their typical "God bless you" and "God send [deleted] you safe ['haven'?]. I presume that these enthusiastic allies were mothers of sacrificed sons of freedom. The little male urchins ran along by our side with a never slackening "So, how 'bout a penny, aye?" Those of them [deleted]more patriotic men[deleted] who were more patriotic than mercenary stood by singing "Hail, Hail, the Gang's All Here," "Over There," and "Good-bye Broadway, Hello France." It is all to wonderful for description.

I talked with one Scotch Highlander who was on leave with several wounds to his credit. In his own words,"he had had a good time." The Huns cap-

Last edit 3 months ago by catslover
PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_019

PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_019

tured - and there are a great many are all in more or less depressed spirits. They now feel that America is in the war, and that she is the overbalancing weight in the scale. I was happy to tell him that we now had 3,000,000 brave, liberty-loving Americans in arms and that 7,000,000 more, or even a greater number, were awaiting their turn to be called to the colors. I have seen [inserted]many[inserted] other wounded soldiers, some slightly, some permanently so.

The man with whom I talked [deleted]told me[deleted] was surprised to here my name. He was familiar, he said, with my ancestors down in Sussex. He had recently seen the old Arundel Castle.

Everything is [deleted]dark[deleted] black here an hour after sunset. Even the [inserted]interesting[inserted] doubledeck [inserted]street[inserted] cars have dim lights. These dark nights [serve?] [deleted]a [?] of old [?] saving of fuel. A precaution against air raids.[deleted] rather as a fuel saver than a air raid prevention.

Last edit 3 months ago by catslover
PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_020

PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_020

August 12 - A very touching incident marked our [inserted]only[inserted]morning in the rest camp. An English "bobby" passed along the edge of our area and spoke to a sentinel. The sentinel called to an officer. The officer [deleted] went to get a private from Headquarters Company. The private [deleted]the [s?] nephew, and the bob[deleted] and the "bobby" had a joyful meeting as nephew and uncle.

Just before we entrained for [Wi??ts] for another rest, a British Lt. Col. gave us a note from His Majesty King George V written in his own hand. It was the great English sovereign's [inserted]personal[inserted] welcome to our outfit of American soldiers who had come to take their stand with their ancestral people to defend those principles which gave their country her birth.

The trip from [Notty Ashe?] to Winchester was most interesting. As first class passengers in the side-opening carriages

Last edit 3 months ago by catslover
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