Journal of Lieutenant Banks Arendell

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PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_041

PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_041

inside the cooking emplacement, the boys quickly took to the cover of a nearby trench. The incident, as I see it, served only to remind those cooks and others that they were really [deleted] in the war.

September 25 - Even before I heard the Captain's crippled foot hit the floor at 16:30 o'clock this morning, I was awake, but prone to remain cozily in my bunk. Shells, H.E's and pip squeakers' galore, were buzzing and bursting all around us. We could here the explosion of the Boche guns; then the whistling sound of the projectile as it passed [inserted]a few feet[inserted] over our heads. It appeared to us [deleted]every time[deleted] that each shell slowed up almost to the stopping point just above us. For we could distinctly hear the [deleted]decreasing[deleted] [inserted]lowering[inserted] inflectioin in the whistles. We all

Last edit 10 months ago by catslover
PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_042

PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_042

followed close upon cripple Captain [Quarles?] heels to the dug-out.

I got a plain view of Meuil today. This [inserted]little[inserted] French village lies among the German front lines just a few hundred yards away from us. It stands in a peculiar position. [inserted]One half of it is No Man's Land, the other half German positions. [deleted]Never a French shell strikes it, for F[deleted] Only minor signs of living are ever apparent there. By day women have been seen carrying water, [inserted]old[inserted] men digging potatoes [inserted]invariably just one or two at a time.[inserted] Never a French shell falls within its limited bound[deleted]. The name of "Deserted Village" [inserted]is[inserted] certainly applicable to Meuil.

At nine o'clock, by America time, we took cover again, while Bochy tried a few ranging shots up the valley before us.

September 29 - Front line. listening post 50 x from Boche. [inserted]French[inserted] [G?] who led us made me tremble

Last edit 10 months ago by catslover
PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_043

PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_043

when he put his loaded revolver in one hand and a [deleted]hand[deleted] grenade in the other. I was almost bent on turning back. Yet no German was to be seen or heard. I hope we seem as quiet and as careful to them as they do to us.

September 30 - Went to St.Die on business [deleted]foo[deleted] for my captain. But for the war, I would have enjoyed the picturesque mountains and fertile valleys, dotted here and there with villages large and small. During our trip over the mountain before St. Die, we came across the battery of French 75's which supports our sector. The four guns in front of me were so well camouflaged that [deleted]the driver of[deleted] I came within a very few yards of them without viewing either the guns or their positions. The French know this war game.

[deleted] St. Die is a town which every American should have a profound

Last edit 10 months ago by catslover
PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_044

PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_044

regard for. It was this town which gave the name of (look up) to our beloved country. A card of welcome [inserted]to A. soldiers[inserted] adorns one of the most conspicuous buildings there. It reads: "To all Americans. The town of St. Die which in 1507 had the honor of giving a name to your country welcomes all American soldiers."

October 2. The Hun has been [deleted] fearfully quiet during the last 24 hours. Frankly to say, we would rather have his noisy shells than have his puzzling quietude. Something like the younger daughter who [deleted]called the attention of her mother[deleted] [inserted]told mother[inserted] of her anxiety about baby brother because she heard him keeping [deleted]still[deleted] quiet. But our order says "be prepared for any eventuality. We are always obedient to orders.

October 3 - Orders came down to the trenches today for me to pack

Last edit 10 months ago by catslover
PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_045

PC_1560_Banks_Arendell_Papers_Journal_045

up and be prepared to [deleted][??] off[deleted] move out to the Third Army School at Clamency. [deleted]I'm[?]out[deleted] Move out, I did, just about as [inserted]suddenly as[inserted] my order came. I caught the train at Raon L'Etape. [deleted][?][deleted] While we were loading on our luggage, a German aviator flew low right over us. No one showed any apprehension, so I was not scared either.

Oct. 4 - We passed most of today on sidings, getting off [deleted]every[deleted] now [deleted]and then[deleted] at this village and then at that for a small meal and ---.

Oct. 5 - Our morning siding today, fortunately for us, was just opposite [inserted]one of[inserted] the biggest American [deleted][?][deleted] [inserted]S.O.S.(spell out)[inserted] [deleted][?][deleted] [inserted]depot[inserted] in France. A veritable S.O.S. it seemed. Crowded for hundreds and hundreds of yards in every direction was [deleted]various and sundry[deleted] war material of every kind and description.

Last edit 10 months ago by catslover
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