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JohnModica at Aug 15, 2018 05:11 PM

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to put poverty into categories. We have the young poor, the
old poor, the culture of poverty poor, the rural poor and the
urban poor. It is a very neat way to do it. Instead of land
or money, the poor are offered programs to improve their charac-
ter or their children's educations. Not willing or able to say
our institutions are incapable of meeting even the basic needs
of people and therefore need to be radically altered, we look
for panaceas and explanations. Recently, it has become fash-
ionable to explain urban poverty as being the result of years
of unattended rural poverty. The fact that the PEOPLE involved
are useless to our high-powered economic machine, whether they
are classified as rural or urban, is hidden nicely behind a
big finger pointing at rural America saying
"The problem is there!" The inability to
begin working on the myriad of urban problems, perhaps even an
understandable human incapability to comprehend what it will
take to rebuil the worst several blocks of Harlem (where the
population density is so high that if all Americans were
forced to live as jammed together all 200 million could be
fitted into three of New York's five burroughs, leaving the
other two and the rest of the United States totally unpopulated),
the immensity of the task of stopping a machine out of control,
makes the thought of builing a decent society in rural America
minor in comparison.

"And how will this rebuilding of rural America take place?
As yet, there is no committment on the part of the federal

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