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ALourie at Nov 07, 2019 12:13 PM

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Bunjil is also the Eaglehawk, but - nowhere is there the
[confusion?] of [?] [?] [?] or of nature which is found in the
[?] via the tribal legend. Bunjil is represented as an old blackfellow,
the benign [words crossed out] or head man of the tribe.
[crossed out - He lived and He had] His two wives who were [gunawara?] ([Blacktown?])
and according to [some?] accounts his [son?] is Biribial -(the
Rainbow). Other accounts are that [space left in text] was his son.
[crossed out - A legend ?] He [crossed out - also] is a son of [?] [crossed out - gives] [?] the master
of the Kulin then also of life and [-] a legend reminds him
in the distant past when the Kulin intermarried [word crossed out]
regard [to?] class distinction in the [restriction?] of relationship,
he gave his [sisters?] to the medicine men who had, consulted
him that the people should [?] themselves [?] [?]
parts, "Bunjil in this so the and [?] in that side".,
[in this?] accounting for the [division?] of the comment [?] [?] two the
[exogamies?] intermarrying [?] interests relate to Kulin marriage.

[Crossed out Finally?] Another Bunjil legend recounts
from Bunjil [?] up to them & they all then call his people, [?]
["siris?"] the legend says, in a whirlwind which the
[murk ain?] (Beliac believe) had [tied?] up in a [skin?] [bag?].

There they remain as the pointed [?] of the old men
[for the?] crossed out - young] boys. A significant instance is that of Berak.
When he was a boy "before [his ?] whiskers began to grow" his
mother brother took him out of the camp at night
and pointing [?] with his spear thrower
said "But that one is Bunjil - you see him and he
sees you. commonlyBunjil was spoken of as "[Munya njain?]" that
is "father-son" rather than of the others name. I have some
[Bu?] question again. indicating "old man - [up there?]" to
avoid [3 words crossed out] speaking [?] [?] Bunjil; -

One thing has struck me in [crossed out -these] this legend which
[?] for this being namely the [preponderance?] in [crossed out - them]
him of the anthropomorphic element. [crossed out - In the custom]

Usually the actors in these tales combine the humans [word crossed out]
and animal element to completely tell one cannot tell
where the legend and the [?] ends. But taking Bunjil
as the example, he is in all cases the old blackfellow
while [?]

[rest of page is unreadable]

1

Bunjil is also the Eaglehawk, but - nowhere is there the
[confusion?] of [?] [?] [?] or of nature which is found in the
[?] via the tribal legend. Bunjil is represented as an old blackfellow,
the benign [words crossed out] or head man of the tribe.
[crossed out - He lived and He had] His two wives who were [gunawara?] ([Blacktown?])
and according to [some?] accounts his [son?] is Biribial -(the
Rainbow). Other accounts are that [space left in text] was his son.
[crossed out - A legend ?] He [crossed out - also] is a son of [?] [crossed out - gives] [?] the master
of the Kulin then also of life and [-] a legend reminds him
in the distant past when the Kulin intermarried [word crossed out]
regard [to?] class distinction in the [restriction?] of relationship,
he gave his [sisters?] to the medicine men who had, consulted
him that the people should [?] themselves [?] [?]
parts, "Bunjil in this so the and [?] in that side".,
[in this?] accounting for the [division?] of the comment [?] [?] two the
[exogamies?] intermarrying [?] interests relate to Kulin marriage.

[Crossed out Finally?] Another Bunjil legend recounts
from Bunjil [?] up to them & they all then call his people, [?]
["siris?"] the legend says, in a whirlwind which the
[murk ain?] (Beliac believe) had [tied?] up in a [skin?] [bag?].

There they remain as the pointed [?] of the old men
[for the?] crossed out - young] boys. A significant instance is that of Berak.
When he was a boy "before [his ?] whiskers began to grow" his
mother brother took him out of the camp at night
and pointing [?] with his spear thrower
said "But that one is Bunjil - you see him and he
sees you. commonlyBunjil was spoken of as "[Munya njain?]" that
is "father-son" rather than of the others name. I have some
[Bu?] question again. indicating "old man - [up there?]" to
avoid [3 words crossed out] speaking [?] [?] Bunjil; -

One thing has struck me in [crossed out -these] this legend which
[?] for this being namely the [preponderance?] in [crossed out - them]
him of the anthropomorphic element. [crossed out - In the custom]

Usually the actors in these tales combine the humans [word crossed out]
and animal element to completely tell one cannot tell
where the legend and the [?] ends. But taking Bunjil
as the example, he is in all cases the old blackfellow
while [?]

[rest of page is unreadable]