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JohnModica at Aug 15, 2018 04:53 PM

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our society prefers to pay the estimated $140,000 a male citi-
zen cant cost the public if he lives from 17 to 57 years of age
on public assistance payments, rather than loan the same man
$50,000 to purchase a business, a farm, a recreational area, or
invest in stocks and bonds, for that matter. That it doesn't
make sense, is beside the point.

"1968 saw an increase of "surplus" people and a decrease in
the number of people receiving "surplus" food. In the rural
South it was the year of the squeeze. The black man is no
longer needed. And he is certainly no longer wanted by his
former white owners or employers. Without a job, without an
education-------------------------------------------------------without
training--------------------------------------------------------------------
without land and with little hope of getting any, without hous-
ing, health, or hope the black American depends upon whatever
job he or she can get, whatever assistance private do-gooding
groups can muster, and upon welfare.

No discussion of rural poverty can be complete without
mentioning a great perpetrator of it, welfare policies. In
Mississippi, Aid to Dependent Children (ADC) averages $8.50
a week per family; the maximum is $50 a month regardless of the
number of children in the family. Many families are forced
to live or, better, to try to live on this $50. It must pay
for food, shelter, clothing, and heat, not to mention health

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6

our society prefers to pay the estimated $140,000 a male citi-
zen cant cost the public if he lives from 17 to 57 years of age
on public assistance payments, rather than loan the same man
$50,000 to purchase a business, a farm, a recreational area, or
invest in stocks and bonds, for that matter. That it doesn't
make sense, is beside the point.

"1968 saw an increase of "surplus" people and a decrease in
the number of people receiving "surplus" food. In the rural
South it was the year of the squeeze. The black man is no
longer needed. And he is certainly no longer wanted by his
former white owners or employers. Without a job, without an
education-------------------------------------------------------without
training--------------------------------------------------------------------
without land and with little hope of getting any, without hous-
ing, health, or hope the black American depends upon whatever
job he or she can get, whatever assistance private do-gooding
groups can muster, and upon welfare.

No discussion of rural poverty can be complete without
mentioning a great perpetrator of it, welfare policies. In
Mississippi, Aid to Dependent Children (ADC) averages $8.50
a week per family; the maximum is $50 a month regardless of the
number of children in the family. Many families are forced
to live or, better, to try to live on this $50. It must pay
for food, shelter, clothing, and heat, not to mention health