1914-01-13 Greenville Piedmont

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Street Sale GREENVILLE DAILY PIEDMONT. 10 PAGES; ONE SECTION WEATHER PARTLY CLOUDY TONIGHT, WED VOLUME 84-- No. 35. VOLCANO DESTROYS PART OF AN ISLAND THOUSANDS KILLED Enter Western Part of the Island of Ambrym, Newhebrides is Wrecked Inhabiants Fled to Boats When Crackers Became Active, One Steamers Saved Five Hundred Natives Islands are Afire. (By The Associated Preek) Tokio, Jun. 13-- A tidal wave crudded terrors to the earthquake in Kagoshima yesterday. It is believed the disaster is the most serious in Janese history. Thousands Dead. (By The Announced Preek) Nagawuki, Japan, Jan 13-- Indirection today are that the death that from earthquakes, and volume disturbances around Kangoshimn, will reach thousands. Kangushima, with a population of sixty thousand, is buried under ashes and lava. Hundreds perished on Sakura island. Doctors have gone to the scene. It is difficult to jouney because of the damage done to railroads by earthquakes. Tracks are blocked with lava and ashes. (By The Associate Press) Victoria B. C, Jan 13-- News of the devastation by a volcano of the entire western part of the Island of Ambryn, Newhebrides, was recieved here from the steamship Makura, of the Canadian-Australian line. On December 8 six now craters were observed in native eruption. The next day Mount Minnie collapsed Inbutitable fled to boats which they had hardly reached when two new craters burst and overwhelmed the country with a flood of molten lava. The streamer France saved five hundred natives. The islands are afire. No vegestables left. Covered with cinders. Air filed with dust, sulphur fumes. Devastations complete. COLD WAVE OVER COUNTRY CAUSES GREAT SUFFERING NEARLY TWO THOUSAND MEN GIVEN LODGING IN NEW YORK LAST NIGHT. ARMY OF IDLE TO HELP HARVEST ICE PROBABLY Prospects are That Gold Wave will Continue for the Next Twenty four Hours-- There is a General Cold Wave Over theSouthh and it Has Been Damaged in Some Places--- Thirty Degrees Below at White River Canada. (By The Associated Press.) New York, Jan 13-- The entire central and eastern section of the United States is experiencing freezing weather today. Prospects are it will continue for twenty four hours. There is a general cold wave over the south. It si feared the orange have been damaged in some places. Its was ten above zero this morning here. The lowest temperature was 80 below at White River, Canada. It was 20 below at Devil's Lake North Dakota, zero at Sycause. New York and 10 above at Boston. One death was recorded here last night. There is much suffering Nearly two thousand men on beds last night at the municpal lodging house. A rise in temerature is predicted for Chicago. If the cold continues, an army of Idle men will be sent to help harvest the ice. MRS. TAYLOR DIED AT TAYLORS THIS MORNING Mrs. F. M. Taylor, of Taylors, died at her home at that place this morning about 4 o'clock after ah illness of about one week with pneumonia. She was 39 years of age. She had many friends throughout that section of the county, and her bereaved family have the symathy of that entire community. She is survived by her husband and five childen. Mrs. Taylor was the daughter of Mr. W. J. McCain formerly of Greer, now of Greenville. She is a sister of Mr. W. E. McCain of Greenville, and Mrs. Carrie McCain Troublefield, of Greer. The funeral services will be held tomorrow morning at the Taylor Baptist church, of which Mrs Taylor was a consistent and faithful member of a number of years past. The services will bw conducted by Dr. A. C. Wilkis, of Greenville, assisted by the pastor of the Taylors church, Rev. H. C. Hester. The Interment will take place in the cemetery at the church. TO BE TRANSFERRED. Major Domairion of this City Be Transferred to Fourtenth Cavalry. Major Thomas Donaldson, U C. A will be transferred April I fom the eight cavalry to the fourteenth accordin to an announcement made in Washington yesterday. Major Donaldson is from Greenville, and has many friends here. He was a grad Gain commander of cadets at Clemson College.

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PRESIDENT BACK IN WASHINGTON READY FOR WORK DESK ARE PILED HIGH WITH CORRESPONDENCE THAT HAS ACCUMULATED --------o--------- SEVERAL APPOINTMENTS MUST BE MADE SHORTLY --------o--------- Foremost of the subjects That he Must Immediately Consider Are the Mexican Situation and His Special Message on the Past Legisintion ---. Secretary MeAdor Has a List of Eligible for the Federal Reserve Boars Ready----President Feels Fine.

--------o---------- (By The Associated Press) Washington, Jan 18---President Wilson and family arrived this morning from Pass. Christain and motored in the white house for Breakfast. There was a mass of work facing the president on his three weeks vacation. The desks were piled high with accumulated correspondance Secretary Tumulty permitted only urgent communications to be forwarded to the president, There are appointments to be made, commission to sign, exceed live orders to consider, nos mentioning the coming work with congress. The president must appoint a now surgeon general of the army, a commandant for the marine corps, and select the new federal reserve board. The foremost of subjects be muatimmediately consider are the Mexicans situation and his special message on the trust legislatiom. The cabinet has been summoned for an eleven o'clock meeting, Secretary McAdon had a list of eligibles for the reserve board ready. Secretary Garrison presented Col. W. C. Gorgas, famous for his sanitary work in the Pahama Canal Zone, for surgeon general. The president felt bad. Its colds are all gone and he is in the pink of health. ----------o--------- SPEED TRIALS FOR ARGENTINE WARSHIP ----------o--------- Boston, Jan, 13--The management of the Fore River Shipbuilding Company hope to sendout the the new Argentine worship Rivadale for her speed and endurance heats this week. When the new dreadmought steams forth she will be in charge of Captain Joseph A. Kemp as navgator, while Frank O. Wellington, assistant president, will act as representative of the company. For the Argentine Republic Admiral Bethoher and most of his 110 officer will be aboard. She will tie up at the new Commonwealth pier, and will be the first warship to moor at this the largest dock in the world, Several days will be required, to put aboard the thirty earloads of hand picked coal in sacks and then her prow will be turned outward once again and along the Massachusetts coast. Transports are ecpected to reach Boston with the 1000 troops who are to man her. It will be close to May 1 before she can be turned over for really to the Argentine government. When she arrives at Boenox Ayres an ovation is assured.

VICTORS AND VANQUISH OF THE BATTLE OF OJINAGA

[Pic of a man in a hat standing with a big hat on holding a long rifle gun] In caption General "PANCHO" VILLA AND ONE OF HIS CAPTURED GUNS [Picture of men head shot with a big hat on, the left] In Caption GENERAL PASCUAL OROZCO [Picture of man head shot with a big hat on at the bottom of the man standing with the gun] In the Caption GENERAL TRINIDAD RODRIQUEZ [section to blurry to read under picture ]

[3rd column] CRIMINAL COURT NOW IN SESSION ANDERSON COUNTY ---------o-------- MURDER CASE IS THE FIRST CASE TO BE CALLED----NEGRO IS ACCUSED --------o--------- OTHER INTERESTING NEWS FROM THE ELECTRIC CITY ---------o--------- Mr. Barry C Coles Field Secretary of the Chamber of Commerce of the United State, to Attend Annual Meeting of the South Carolina Association of Commercial Secretaries Which Meets in Anderson, Friday of This Week- Smoker to be Given. ---------o--------- Anderson, Jan 13--A Garret Undeqn; colored, was placed on trial in the court of general sessions Monday afternoon for the murder of Zeke Bradley, also a negro. The killing occured at Plassant Grove church in Martin township, last summer and this is the second time. Dodson has been on trial, jury having failed to agree as the last term of the court and a mistrial having been oriarent Garrett is represented by Mr. T Frank Watkins. Courtt was opened at 10 o'clock yesterday. with Judge John S, Wilson manning prosiding. There was some delay in getting started for the reason that two of the members of the grand jurors, Mr. P. R. Earle and Mr. W. S. Mauldir, were late in reporting, and for that reason that some time was taker, no in prosetting affdavitsos several of the petit jurors who wished to be exposed. Four of these latber, Messrex J.D. Beacham, C. H. Ortmon, J. E. Garrison and W. B. Merrit were excused and a fifth, Mr. F. O. Hawkins had not reported up to the time the dinner recess was taken. When the lost of the grand jurors had reported. Judges Wilson asked them to withdraw and choose a foreman. This was done, and in a few moments it was announced that Mr. J. B. Donthit had begun solvlvit, he being one of the grand jury this time are. Hold overs: J. B. Druthit, WFJ Clinkscales, H..V..G.. Couley.

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GREENVILLE DAILY PIEDMONT. 10 PAGES: ONE SECTION WEATHER:PARTLY CLOUDY TONIGHT, WEDNESDAY FAIR, WARMER. HOME EDITION. VOLUME 84-No.35 GREENVILLE, S. C. TUESDAY AFTERNOON, JANUARY 13,1914. PRICE 5 CEN[TS]

VOLCANO DESTROYS PART OF AN ISLAND THOUSANDS KILLED Entire Western Part of the Island of Ambrym, New Hebrides is Wrecked--Inhabitants Fled to Boats When Craters Became Active--One Steamer Saved Five Hundred Natives--Island are Afire.

(By The Associated Press.) Tokyo, Jan. 13- A tidal wave added terrors to the earthquake in Kagoshima yesterday. It is believed the disaster is the most serious in Japanese history.

Thousands Dead. (By The Associated Press.) Nagasaki Japan, Jan. 13-Im[?plications?] today are that the death [?toll?] from earthquakes and volcanic disturbances around Kagoshima will reach thousands. Kagoshima, with a population of sixty thousand, is [?hurled?] under ashes and lava.

Hundreds perished on Sakura Island. Doctors have gone to the scene. It is difficult to journey because of damage done to railroads by earthquakes. Tracks are blocked with lava and ashes.

(By The Associated Press.) Victoria B. C; Jan. 18- News of the devastation by a volcano of the entire western part of the Island of Ambryn, Newhebrides, was received here from the Steamship [?Makura?], of the Canadian-Australian[?line?].

On December 8 six new crators were observed in active eruption. The next day Mount Minnie collapsed. Inhabitants fled to boats which they had hardly reached when two new craters burst and overwhelmed the country with a flood of molten lava.

The steamer France saved five hundred natives. The islands are afire. No vegetation left. Covered with cinders. Air filled with dust, sulphur fumes. Devastations complete.

COLD WAVE OVER COUNTRY CAUSES GREAT SUFFERING

NEARLY TWO THOUSAND MEN GIVEN LODGING IN NEW YOEK LAST NIGHT.

ARMY OF IDLE TO HELP HARVEST ICE PROBABLY

[?Prospects?] are That Cold Wave will Continue for the Next Twentyfour Hours- There is a General Cold Wave Over the South and it has Been Damaged in Some Places- Thirty Degrees Below at White River, Canada.

(By The Associated Press.) New York. Jan 13- The entire central and eastern section of the United States is experiencing freezing weather today. [?Prospects?] are it will continue for twenty four hours. There is a general cold wave [?over?] the south. It is [?feared?]the orange crops have been damaged in some places. It was ten above zero this morning here.

The lowest temperature was 30 below at White River, Canada. It was [?] below at Devil's Lake, North Dakota, zero at [?Syracuse?], New York and 10 above at Boston.

One death was recorded here last night. There is much suffering. Nearly two thousand men were given beds last night at the [?] lodging house.

A rise in temperature is predicted for Chicago. If the cold continues, an army of idle men will be sent to help harvest the ice.

MRS. TAYLOR DIED AT TAYLORS THIS MORNING

Mrs. P. M. Taylor, of [?Taylors?], died at her home at that place this morning about [?1?] o'clock, after an Illness of about one week with pneumonia. She was [?39 / 89?] years of age. She had many friends throughout that section of the county, and her bereaved family have the sympathy of that entire community. She is survived by her husband and five children, Mrs. Taylor was the daughter of Mr. W. J. McCain, formerly of [?Groer?], now of Greenville. She is a sister of Ms. W. E. McCain of Greenville, and Mrs. Carrie McCain [?Troublefield of Green?].

The funeral service will be held tomorrow morning at the Taylors Baptist church of which Mrs. Taylor was a consistent and faithful member of a number of years past. The services will be conducted by Dr A. C. Wilkins, of Greenville, assisted by the pastor of the Taylors church, Rev. H. C. Hester. The interment will take place in the cemetery at the church.

TO BE TRANSFERRED.

Major Donaldson of this [city]. He Transferred to Fourteenth Cavalry.

Major Thomas Donaldson. U. C. A. will be transferred April [1] from the eighth cavalry to the fourteenth, according to an announcement made in Washington yesterday.

Major Donaldson is from Greenville, and has many friends here. He was at [one ??] commandant of cadets at [Clomson] College.

PRESIDENT BACK IN WASHINGTON READY FOR WORK

DESKS ARE PILED HIGH WITH CORRESPONDENCE THAT HAS ACCUMULATED.

SEVERAL APPOINTMENTS MUST BE MADE SHORTLY

Foremost of the subjects That he Must immediately Consider Are the Mexican Situation and His Special Message on the Trust legislation-- Secretary McAdoo Has a list of [?eligibles?] for the Federal Reserve, [Board] Ready- President Feels Fine.

(By The Associated Press.) Washington. Jan. 13- President Wilson and family arrived this morning from [?Pass Christian?] and motored to the white house for breakfast. There was a mass of work facing the president on his three weeks vacation.

The desks were piled high with accumulated correspondence. Secretary Tumulty permitted only argent communications to forwarded to the president.

There are appointment to be made, commissions to sign, executive orders to consider, not mentioning the coming work with congress. The president must appoint a new surgeon general of the army, a commandant for the marine corps, and select the new federal reserve board.

The foremost of subjects he must immediately consider are the Mexican situation and his special message of the trust legislation.

The cabinet has been summoned for an eleven o'clock meeting.

Secretary McAdoo had a list of eligibles for the reserve board ready. Secretary Garrison present Col. W. C. [Gorgas], famous for his [?monitary?] work in the Panama Canal Zone for surgeon general.

The president felt fine. His colds are all gone and he is in the peak of health.

SPEED TRIALS FOR ARGENTINE WARSHIP

Boston. Jan. 13-The management of the [Fore] River Shipbuilding Company hope to send out the new Argentine warship [Bivudaria] for her speed and endurance tests this week. When the new dreadnought [?] forth she will be in charge of Captain Joseph A. Kemp as navigator, while Frank O. Wellington, assistant president, will act as representative of the company.

[?] the Argentine Republic Admiral [Hetbeher] and most of his 110 officers will be aboard.

She will tie up at the near Commonwealth pier, and will be the first warship to anchor at this, the largest dock in the World. Several [daps] will be required to put aboard the thirty carloads of hand picked coal in sacks and and then her [prow] will be turned outward once again and along the Massachusetts coast.

Transports are expected to reach Boston with the 1,000 troops who are to man her. It will be close to May [1] before she can be turned over formally to the Argentine government. When she arrives are Buenos Ayres an ovation is assured.

VICTORS AND VANQUISHED OF THE BATTLE OF OJINAGA

[[left to right]] [picture of a man labelled 'GENERAL PASCUAL GROZCO'] [picture of a man holding a machine gun labelled 'GENERAL "PANCHO" VILLA AND ONE OF HIS CAPTURED GUNS'] [picture of a man labelled 'GENERAL JOSE YNEZ SALAZAR'] [picture of a man labelled 'GENERAL TRINIDAD RODRIGUEZ']

[ extended label]: General Fancisco Villa, after about no more than half the three hundred prisoners he took after the fall of [Ojinaga]. sent troops, of which General Rodrigues is commanding a division toward [?Torreanas?] as the next stop in his [advance] [on] Mexico City.

General Salazar and Grozco, who General Villa said he would kill if he captured them, were among the last of the federal generals to leavethe city. For a [?] it was [?] had fallen into the hands of the [?], but later the [?] was circulated that he had reached the American side, had eluded the [American] officers, and was on his way to the Texas [?].

CRIMINAL COURT NOW IN SESSION ANDERSON COUNTY

MURDER CASK IS THE FIRST CASE TO BE CALLEDNEGRO IS ACCUSED

OTHER INTERESTING NEWS FROM THE ELECTRIC CITY

Mr. Harry C. Coles, General Field Secretary of the Chamber of Commerce of the United States, to Attend Annual Meeting of the South Carolina Association of Commercial Secretaries, Which Meets in Anderson, Friday of This Week- Smoker to be Given.

Anderson, Jun. 13- A. [Gatrett] Dodson, colored, was placed on trial in the court of general session Monday afternoon for the murder of Zeke Bradley, also a negro. The killing occured at Pleasant Grove church in [Martin] township last summer,-and this is the second time Dodson has been on trial, jury having failed to agree at the last term of the court and a mistrial having been ordered, [Gatrett] is represented by Mr. T. Frank Watkins.

Court was opened at 10 o'clock yesterday, with Judges John S. Wilson of [Manning] presiding. There was some delay in getting started for the reason that two of the membors of the grand jurors, Mr. P. R Barle and Mr. W. S. [Manidie], were late in reporting, and for the reason that some time was taken up in presenting [?adidarits?] of several of the [?] jurors who wished to be [excused]. Four of these latter, [?Messrs?]. J. D. [Boacham], C. H. [Orlaman], J. E. Garrison and W. H. [Morral], were excused and a fifth, Mr [W]. [O]. Haw kins had not reported up to the time the dinner recess was taken.

When the last of the grand jurors had reported, Judge Wilson asked them to withdraw and choose a foreman. This was done, and in a few moments it was announced that Mr. J. B. Douthit had been selected, he being one of the six hold-overs. The members of the grand jury this time are: Hold-overs: J. B. Douthit, Will Clinkscalesm H. V. G. Cooley, P. R. Earle, S. [K]. Burns and J. F. McDonald, New members: T. J. [Clas worth], W. J. [Saytors], R. W. Tribble. W. S. Mauldin, [Limus] McPhail, S. N. Gilmer, H. J. Martingm [Jas]. R. Anderson, D. C. Brown, J. F. Watson, (Continued on fifth page.)

MATERIAL REDUCTIONS IN THE NEW EXPRESS RATES

On February first, the new express rates, which have been twice postponed, will be put into effect by all the express companies of the country, in accordance with the orders of the interstate commerce commission. The new rates will give substantial reductions over the rates at present in use.

The new rates are divided into three [classes], First, second and third. First class rates apply on merchandise. Second class rates apply on all articles of food or drink. This rate is 75 percent of the first class rate. Third class rates apply on [airmamues, bocks, calenders, etc]. The basis of the new rates is the Zone and Block system. The country is first divided into five zones: Zone 1, taking in the Eastern Zones; Zone 2, the Southern States; Zone 3, The Middle Western States; Zone 4, the Rocky Mountain States; and Zone 5, the Pacific Coast States. These zones are then reduced to Blocks, each Block being fifty miles square.

In this manner, all inconsistencies that may have existed in the past in [rate] constructions, have been wiped out, and the [?] not only simplified and [?] understandable even to the novice, but every section of hamlet in the land is put on an equal footing. In other words, there are no inequalities to the [new] sales.

Another matter of interest and importance to the shipper, is the fact that the new rates apply to and from all points in the United States regardless of what particular Express Company handles the shipment. So far as the public is concerned, all lines of [demarkation] as between the various Express Companies have been wholly obliterated and they are now one homogenous whole.

The Express Companies join into a single unit of service over all the numerous railroad lines of the country and thereby enable the shipper to deal with one carrier, avoid delays to goods at junction points, as well as damage in handling, and in various other ways facilitate the quick transportation of millions of shipments entrusted to their care.

The Southern Express Company accepts the order of the Interstate commerce commission gracefully and in good faith, and there is no reason to doubt its management will make good their expressed purpose to give the patrons of the company a service that will prove helpful and satisfactory, notwithstanding the [?trenier dour?] less in revenue.

Rates From Greenville. Some interesting information, as as comparison between the old rates and the new, are given in the following table, which shows the rates between Greenville and a number of important points, for packages, of five, ten, and twenty pounds:

Between 5lbs. Old. New. Old. New. Greenville and Old. New. 10 lbs. 20 lbs. Atlanta $ [.70] $ .20 $ [.15] $ .32 $ [.52] $ [.44] Boston .70 [.34] [1.50] .47 1.26 .75 New York .70 [.82] [.70] [.40] 1.20 .69 Philadelphia .60 [.41] .80 .43 1.18 .66 Baltimore .60 .30 .75 .41 1.00 .62 Chicago .75 .34 1.00 .45 1.15 .70 Detroit .70 .32 1.00 .47 1.30 .75 Denver .80 .48 [1.25] .75 2.00 1.31 Milwaukee .75 .41 1.10 .53 1.40 1.06 St. Paul .80 .37 1.20 .55 1.75 .90

ENGINEER DIED RUNNING TRAIN MILE A MINUTE

(By The Associated Press.) Seattle. Wash, Jan. 13. - While driving a locomotive nearly a mile a minute, George H. Perry, an engineer on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul [fest] mail train, the Olympian, dropped dead at the throttle. He had just won a race from a rival train on a [rond] parallelling his. The fireman saw he was dead and run the train into [Luconis], where another engineer took charge. Perry had been in the engine [cab] forty years. He was 68 year old yesterday.

MAYOR OF BELTON.

Mr. [Ross] Mitchell is Chosen by Majority of one Vote.

Belton, Jan. 13- By a majority of one vote, Mr. [Ross] Mitchell was today elected mayor of Belton over Mr. J. J. Clement, the total vote cast being 101. It is possible that the election will be run over again in view of the closeness of the vote and other circumstances. All the former alderman were re-elected, and one new one, Mr. Press Acker, was chosen.

CAT'S SCRATCH FATAL

Pana. Ill, Jan. 18 - While petting the family cat a few days ago Mrs [Cathryn Ukena], 70 years old, suffered a slight scratch on her hand, blood poison developed, and resulted in Mrs. [Ukena's] death.

ANNUAL MESSAGE 10 STATE LEGISLATURE WAS SENT IN BY THE GOVERNOR TODAY

LITTLE BUSINESS IN LEGISLATURE ON OPENING DAY

Next Thursday is set for Balloting to Commence to Fill Vacancies on Supreme Court [?Brech?] - Dr. C. T. Wyche in Elected Speaker Pro Tem.

Special to The Daily Piedmont. Columbia, Jan. 13 - Beyond reading the governor's message practically no business was transacted in the senate today, both houses met promptly at noon.

The house fixed Friday as the day for holding memorial services for deceased members, and fixed Thursday for the joint assembly to begin balloting to fill the various vacancies. Dr C. T. Wyche of Newberry, was elected speaker pro tem of the house.

Both houses [?adjusted?] [?to?] meet tomorrow at noon. A full attendance was on [band] [?] both houses W. F. Caldwell

BE DEFINITE IN FIRE ALARMS URGES CHIEF

Chief [Legon] Asks That Public Give More Specific Information as to Location of Fires, When Turning in Alarms.

BE DEFINITE Two fire alarms, one this morning about 9 o'clock, and another early this afternoon, caused the local fire department to make two runs today. The fire this morning destroyed a small two rooms [house], occupied by [?], in [?] Cripple Creek [?], beyond the city limits. The [?] until the five wagon had made the run, since the alarm came in to the police station, and merely stated that there was "a fire at the coal [?]."

A pile of [grass], fire near a residence of [Augustu] street, was the occasion for the alarm this afternoon. No damage was done.

In discussion the method of turning in fire alarms, Chief R. [L]. Lagon of the local department today called attention to the lack of definite information generally given by persons sending in the alarm, which has more than once caused the department to cover much unnecessary ground. The chied said also that quite a number of times alarms have been sent in to the police station.

"The telephone number for the sending in of fire alarms is number thirty-one" said the chied, "and I hope all persons will send in alarms by calling this number. People will also materially assist the department by giving specific directions as to the location of the fire, instead of merely stating the names of the street."

[M.Y] DISAGREE AS TO TIM OF HOLDING HORSE SHOW

Plans for the Organization of the Proposed State Horse Show Circuit will be Made at [bleeting] to be Held in Columbia, Tomorrow.

Representatives from Greenville, Darlingtonm [Camden], [Sumier], Columbia and Greenwood will meet in Columbia, Wednesday, to perfect plans for the organization of the proposed state horse show associations to be composed of the above mentioned cities, Mr. Joseph A. [McCellough] and Mr. Henry T. [Mills], president and secretary treasurer, respectively, of the Greenville Horse Show association, will be among those from Greenville to attend the meeting.

Mr Mills, who is the moving spirit in the proposition for a horse show circuit, is optimistic over the prospects, but is inclined to believe there may be some [?dissenson?] among the representatives in formulating the plans. Some of the cities are in favor of holding the shows in the spring of the year, while others appear faverable to the fall show. However, representative citizens of all the cities involved have assured the local association their co-operation in the matter.

Secretary Mills with the assistance of his committeemen, has compiled a proposed list of premiums for the next Greenville Horse show, which will be submitted to the board of directors of the local association, within the near future

CHARITY AID SOCIETY

The annual meeting the Charity Aid Society will be held on Wednesday, January 14th, at 11 o'clock. At this meeting officers and directors for the year will be elected.

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TWO GREENVILLE DAILY PIEDMONT, TUESDAY, JANUARY 13, 1914.

ANNUAL MESSAGE TO THE STATE LEGISLATURE SENT BY GOVERNOR

(Continued from first page.)

[Callough], who also vacated his position on the historical commission, by serving several times as special judge, which has been held to be [an] office in this state. Yet Mr McCallough, like Judge Smith, in open defiance of the law, [holds] to his position on the historical commission and continues to [act], and he and Mr. Smith with two other members of the Commission, [?Messes?], Kennedy and Snowden, [get] themselves up as the historical commission is open violation and defiance of the constitution of this state.

"Yet gentlement, I am criticised for [pardoning] this little fellow who violates the laws and begs for mercy, while this "big" man is above the law, and cannot be reached, and [?Bxxxx?] is criticised on the charge of creating a political disturbance, while these "big" men, and others like them, are causing the turmoil by refusing to abide by the law.

"I can't understand why these men are so [?] of this little [?jola?] [There] is supposed to be no money in it-not even actual expenses of attending the meetings. Why is it that these two distinguished gentlemen hold on like bull dogs hold on to a piece of bone. Doesn't it look as it there is something in the [woodpile]?"

"And why are men holding the high offices of United States Senator and State Senators, so [?] in holding on to college trusteeships, in violation of these constitution of this [state], which they are sworn to uphold? Doesn't is look as if there is something in the woodpile?"

"I [?care?] nothing for the little [?fusion?] on the historical commission. It doesn't interest me personally. I am satisfied [by] whatever history is written as to me, if it is written by my friends it will be fair, and if written by my enemies it will be an infamous lie, such as they have been writing about me since I have been governor and even beforeever since my entrance into politics. Therefore, this little job doesn't make any difference to me, I merely call it and the other matters, to your attention, to show you the [?open?] defiance of the law on the part of certain people, and to show you who is responsible for keeping political peace away.["]

"I recommend that unless you are [?] of allowing these men whom I have mentioned to continue in their open violation and defiance of the constitution that you abolish this historical commission, or have none as I am satisfied the one we have is worthless, useless, and will [move] some day to be more of a nuisance to people who [?] to [the] more true history of this state than [?at?] value."

In view of the proposed legislation in connection with the primary sysstem the views of Governor [Blease] takem from a section of his message to the general assembly are of [essential] interest at this time when primary reform is a vital issue before the people of South Carolina.

"I am opposed to any change in primary system, I believe in [honest] elections, and I believe in letting every white man participate in the primary, who is eligible to vote under the rules of the Democratic Party. When ever we deprive the white people of the right to vote, or any large number of them their right to vote, we will break up the primary system, because those who are qualified want the right to vote, and should have it, and they do not propose to be [put] by any party of men, on an equal footing with a free negro," says the governor.

Review of Primary, In his review of the primary in South Carolina[,] Governor [Blense] gives briefly the history of the [?all?] option of the primary and outlines the reason for it. The last convention, Governor [Blease] points out, for the nominations of a Governor and state officials was when Governor John Peter [?Plehardson?] was nominated for the second term.

"It seems that this system," says the Governor, referring to the primary, was perfectly satisfactory when Governor Tillman, Evans, El[?] and [McSweeney] were elected, and it reached to [?] in the eyes of many people - especially certain newspaper editors - who are now condemning it, and gave most splen[did] satisfaction to the distinguished gentlemen when Governors [Heyward] and [Ansel] were elected. Nothing was heard of its being unsatisfactory to this great element of our people when General Joe. H. [Earle] was elected to the United States Senate and when many Congressmen and many state officials were chosen. But alas the campaign of 1912 came on.

The Governor then reviews the 1912 campaign with regard to the primary charges. He quotes his proclamation calling attention to the [?] to vote buying and his offer of a reward for conventor: cites his speech and [Sumler] along the same line; and then goes into the aftermath of the campaign. He refers to the "charges of fraud brought, and these [holier] than thou lords of democracy, the editors and some other all great guardians of South Carolina's primary, who were defe[a]ted and whipped out of their boots with all their money and chicanery and trickery, all at once discovevered the [he] primary was reeking with fraud and was a corrupt system and was "horrible to contemplate."

The Governor then asks a number of questions: "Why did Blease's opponent need such an enormous campaign fund?" "Was it to pay his campaign expenses [round] over South Carolina? "Was it to pay his son's expenses [[CUTS OFF AT BOTTOM OF PAGE]]

[new column] "Was it to pay the legitimate expenses of his campaign [min....r?] "Why did the railroads make large contributions to Blease's opponent campaign fund? "Why did certain cotton mill presidents make such large contributions to Blease's opponent's campaign fund?" "Had any candidates in South Carolina ever before needed a campaign fund such as was raised against Blease? The Governor concluded with this question: "If men voted in it," referring to the primary, "who are not entitled to vote, who [hauled] them from North Carolina and from Georgia and paid their expenses!" [Charging] that if the primary was corrupted it was corrupted by the sums of money raised. "And handled at a central bureau in Columbia, [and] by parties in other parts of the State," the Governor repeats his statement made on the State-House steps shortly after the primary election that "The other aid had stolen more votes and put them in the ballot box then they know what to do with."

Law Needs Amending. Governor Blease says that it is not the system that needs improving; "It is not the law that needs amending-we have laws enough[,] but it is the [embracement] of that law that we need. Prosecute the men that handed out money and whiskey, or who in the future had out money and whiskey. Prosecute the men who try to buy votes. Prosecute the men who hire people to travel throughout the State under the [guise] of book-agents, newspaper reporters and subscription list builders, and under other guises, and instead of following the [election] which they claim to follow, go around and try to buy voters, trying to

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01131914 4
Needs Review

01131914 4

GREENVILLE DAILY PIEDMONT, TUESDAY, JANUARY 18, 1914 [Letter double the size as previous letters] FORCED PUBLIC SALE! [Word are In a box in the top left corner] FORCED TO THE WALL A clean straight, brief, honest, plain statement of the facts and existing condition. Something entirely new. different from anything ever known in Greenville. Wonders ever do cease. In this bustling world surprises come thick and fast. An opportunity of a life time for the poor as will the rich [End of all words in box]

THE FASHION, [In bold letters] 204 North Main St., Greenville, S.C.

[Words are in a box in the top right corner] To the inevitable, really and truly down and out, forced to the wall, bit off more than he could chew, bought more than he could pay for, counted out by the creditors. You all know tha when the creditors take charge and orde a thing done, that means final orders and must obeyed.

Mr. J B Sadler, who represents the American Special Sales Co., of Atlanta, Ga., and who is in charge of this stock now, actually does not care. The stock belongs to the creditors and Sadlers don't care what to brings. This sale and stock is so much out of the ordinary, that Mr. Sadler, who is here and has been for several days, giving expert attention, going through the stock like a cyclone, ransacking every in corner for goods of all, Kinds to go in this most truthful PUBLIC SALE. Exactly as the clock rain or shine, snow or blow, Sale Starts. Thursday Morning, January 15, 1914, and Continues for 10 Days Only

[3 square sections across the middle of the page] [section 1] Let Nothing Keep You Away [Bold Letters] Attend the opening day , whatever you do. Let nothing keep you away. Don't do anything until you see and hear Sadler Thursday morning, January 15th , at 9 a.m. In a critical situation the real straight from thr shoulder, old fashioned, unvarished truth is the best. The real truth never hurts any one. Truth and conditions cannot be denied. Facts and plain truths are stubborn. Here it is without mincing or hesitating. Come see for yourself.

[section 2][All in bold letters] $20,000 Assortment of Peerless Winter Weaving Apparel for Men, Women and Childre, Dry Goods, Notions, Clothing, Shoes and Furmishing, Ladies' Suits and Coats, Blanklets, Bags and Suit Cases, all New, Clean and Fresh from the World's best makers, to be sold in 10 days' time for whatever it will bring.

[section 3] Right Now [Bold letters] Behind closed doors a great transformation taking place. Business is suspended an the store under lock and key until opening day when Sadler, who represents the creditors, opens this store personally, and the most amazing sight eyes ever beheld will be before you. Wise economist will prepare now, bake your bread, cakes, pies, and so you can come to the opening day and stay all day and attend many succeeding days. Feast on the on the other fellow's misfortune.

[Column one] FREE FREE FREE [Bold letters] To the first 20 men entering our Store THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 9 a.m. will be given absolutely free a beautiful Silk Necktie. ATTEND! [bold letter 2 times the size] CLOTHING FOR MEN AND BOYS Here is where we do you good. Sensational Bargains in America's best makes these values in new winters styles and fabrics will make a tremendous sensation. Every garment strictly hand tailored and bench finished. All pure wool or wool and silk fabrics. Don't miss it. Prices that will almost wake the dead and make all the living sit up and take notice. MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING Priced to Close Out the Entire Line. About fifty Suits for Men and Young Men, fancy mixed fabrics splendidly made bought to sell at $7.50 and $8.00, priced for quick action, per Suit.. .. .. .. .. ............$3.88 Men's $10.00 Suits ---coat,, vest, and pants , in blacks and facies. Sale price.. .. .. .. ................$5.98 $12.50 Suits for Men, fancy mixture fabrics and plain black, lined throughout, a superd value, at each. .. .. .. .... ...... ....................$6.19 MIxed Suits---best mixed and pure wood materials, all the most popular colors and patterns. Positively worth $15 each. Sale price ..$6.19 Men's $18.00 Suits the newest things in style, fabrics and make. Sale price.. .. .... .. .. ...............$12.98Overcoat Overcoats for Men, in heavy brown Kersey, velvet collar, sateen lined, fall length coat, actual value $10 Sale price $5.88 $15.00 Top coats or light weight

[Column Two] Overcoats of imported English covert, each .... ... .... ....$8.69 All wool Pants for Men actual values up to $2.50 pair. Sale price $1.29 Men's $3.00 Pants . Sale price $1.98 Men's $4.00Sale price $2.88 Mens' $5.00 Pants. Sale price .... ... .... ..... ......... $3.19 Boy's Suits, size to 8, .. .. .. ..$1.39 Children's Coats, worth up to $2.25 each..... ... ... .... ..... ............88c Men's fancy dress Shirts, made of Madras and French Ginghams , actual value 75c each. Sale price ... ... ... .... ... ..... .... ..... ...48c Men's fine dress Shirts the new stripes and patterns, cuffs attached or detached, $1.50 value. Sale price.. .. .. ... .... .... ... ... .... 37c Men's Sweater Coats, special grade, extra heavy ribbed, $100 values, Sale price. .. ... ... .... .... .... ... 63c Men's fine Suspenders, genuine Guyot style, sold the world over at 25c Sale price .. .. .. .. ... ... ..13c $3.00 Sweater all woll price, each .. ... ....... .... .... ..... ..... .... ... $1.98 Men's fine Suspenders, special quality of grey, fancy blue denim $1.00 values, each.. ... .... .... ... ..... .63c MEN'S HATS [ bold letters] In soft and stiff, in all Colors $1.50 .. .. .. ... ... .... .. ... ... ...89c $2.00.. .. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...98c $2.50 .. ... .. ... ... .. .. ... ... . $1.48 $3.00 .. ..best grade .. .. .....$1.98 BOYS' AND GIRLS' SCHOOL SHOES Our $1.50 grades to go at.. 98c pair

[Column Three] $2.00 grades at.. .. .. ... ..$1.29 pair Plenty more Shoes too numerous to mention here. LADIES SHOES One lot well worth $2.50 to $3.00 at amazing low price of... 78c pair These are odds and ends Regular $3.00 grades at ... ..$1.39 pair $2.50 grades .. .. .. ... ... ... ...$1.79 pair The Famous American Girl Shoe, $3.00 values, Sacrifice $1.08 pair Our best grades of Ladies' Shoes in all leathers, black and tan button or lace, to be sold at.. .. .. ..$2.69 pair SHOES! SHOES! FOR MEN [Bold letters] One lot Men's values $2.00 Sale price.. .. .. ... ... ... ... .98c pair $2.50 Shoes, excellent value, Sale price.. .. .. .. ... ... .. ... $1.34 pair $3.00 Shoes. Sale price... $2.19 pair The famous Bracon $4.00 Shoes. Sale price.. ... ... ... ... .. ... ... ... .$2.68 World renowned W. L.... Douglas Shoes $3.50 and $4.00 grades. Sale, price.. ... ... ... ... ... ... ...$2.49 pair Louis A. Crossett Famous Shoes, $4.00 and $5.00 grades. Sale price .. .... .... .... ... ... ... .... .... $3.68 pair We have these Shoes in all leathers and styles. MILLINERY AND SUITS [Bold letter] Ladies' Trimmed Hats, worth $2.50 each. Sale price.. ... ... ... ... $1.29 Ladies $5.00 Hats, for street or dress wear, each .. .. ... .... $2.39 Ladies' long Coats of Melton, heaver and fancy mixed fabrics, originally sold for $6.00 and $8.00, each .. .. .... .... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. $2.79 Misses' Coats size 8 to 14 years $2.50 and $3.00 values....Liquidation $2.50 and $3.00 values. Sales price each.. .. .... ..... .... ... .... ... ..$1.39 Ladies' tailor made Coat Suits, superior fabrics, elegantly tailored and made to sell for $12.50

[Column Four] $15.00 each. Priced to close out quick.. .. .. .. .. ... ....... $5.79 $30.00 Coat Suits for Ladies, the newest and best in both material and styles. Sale price. .. .. $18.88 Pearl Buttons, perfect finish, worth 5c card. Sale price.. .. .. .. .. Le Towels ----full bleached, soft finished, cotton huck Towels, size 22 x 35 inches, bought to sell at 23c pair, Sale each ... .. ... ... .... ... ......8c 20 x 42 inch fringed Towels colored border, satin figured, linen finished , actual value 35c pair......Sale price, each.. ...... ..... ... .... .... ... 12c

SWEATERS! SWEATERS! FOR MEN, WOMEN AND CHILDREN Children's Sweaters, remarkably cheap to be sold at.... .. ... 10c each Men's all wool Sweaters a $3.00 value to be sold at.. .. ... ..$1.48 Ladies all wool Sweaters a $3.00 value to be sold at .. .. .. .. $1.48 Youth's Suits values up to $5.00 think it over coat, vest and pants, Sale price. .. .. ... ... ... ... ....98c Children's Russian Blouse Suiyts. sizes from 5 to 9 years, values $2 to $3. Sale price...... ... ... .... 74c All of Men's Odd Coats, in all sizes and colors. Values $3.00, $4.00 and $5.00 at .. .. .. ... ...$1.98 and up Boy's Suits, a most splendid line in Norfolk Jackets and Knicker Pants, in all colors and patterns. Prices Ranging from .. $1.89 to $4

LADIES FURNISHINGS [BOLD LETTERS] Ladies and Children's Handkerchiefs, plain or colores boarders, worth 5c each. Sale price.. .... .2c Ladies' Handkerchiefs, hemstitched, plain and fancy embroidered 10c values, Sale price..............5c Ladies and Misses' full length, fast black or tan cotton Hose, worth 10c pair. Double heel and toe,

[Column Five] FREE! FREE! FREE! To the first 20 Ladies entering o[cut off] store Thursday, January 15, 9 a.m[cut off] will b given absolutely Free 10 yar[cut off] of Dress Goods. (All bold letters] ---------------------------------------------------- A T T E N D [Bold letter] Price............................6 FIXINGS FOR MEN AND BOYS [Bold letters] Men's 10c quality Socks in black tan and fancies. double hells. au [cut off] toes. Sales prices.... .. .. .. ... .. .. .. Men's fine dress Socks in plain and fancies, never before offered less than 15c pair. Sale price p pair .. .. .. .. ... ... ... ... ..6c Best quality silk finished Las [cutoff] thread Socks for Men: in plain black, tan and fancies, 25c value Sale price.. .. .. .. ..... .... ... ..16 Men's extra large white Handkerchiefs, hemstitched, plain or colored boarder, each.. .. ..... ........ ......3 Men's heavy work Shirts 50 cent quality. Sale price.. .... ....... ...37 Men's Handkerchiefs. hemstitched plain and fancy boardered, 12 [cutoff] values. Sale price.. ... ... ... ... ... Colored Outings at very special price .. .. .... .. .......................3 1-2c yard

RAINCOATS [BOLD Letters] For Men, Women and Children Tans and Blues Men's Coats regualar $5 values $2. [cutoff] Men's Coats regular $7.50 vales ..... .... ... .. ... ... .. ..... ............$3 [cutoff] Men's Coats regular $10.00 values .. .. ... ..... .... .... ...... ...... ....... ... $5.99 Ladies' Raiin Coats $5 values $2.99 Ladies Rain Coats $7.50 values .. ... ..... ........ ..... ....... ...... ...$3.99 Ladies Rain Coats $10.00 values .. ... .... .... ..... ............ ......... ..$5.99

[Section under all columns] The entire Stock is laid out on bargain counters, that enable you to pick and choose from large selections at any price. Pick out what you want just as carefully as though you paid the retail prices. Just bring your own eyes and let them see and judge for yourself. THE LAST APPEAL, a word to the wise id sufficient. Take the hint! It is impossible to describe with printer's ink the amazing sight of this Great Bargain Event.

[letters in Box to the left at bottom]

LOOK FOR THE BIG RED SIGN! [Bold Letters] The Sign that points the way to the logical point for you to buy where your money goes the farchest. Remember this a bargain depends on what you get. Sadler sells the bargains and

[Bold Letters in middle of 2 boxes at the bottom] THE FASHION, 204 North Main Street Greenville S. C.

[Letters in Box to the right at bottom]

NO IDLE TALK, BUT A BONA-FIDE SALE

That includes Everything in Stock. Salemen and Saleladies At Once

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01131914 5
Incomplete

01131914 5

GREENVILLE DAILY PIEDMONT, TUESDAY , JANUARY 13, 1914 [COLUMN ONE] Greenville Daily Piedmont es

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