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[across all columns]
GREENVILLE DAILY PIEDMONT, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 31, 1915. F[IVE]

[column 1]

[advertisement for Globe optometrists]

[image of glasses]
Knowledge of the
Functions of the Eye

Is necessary, to fit glasses
as they should be fitted.

Glasses that are fitted by
simply using glass after
glass until one is found
that gives good vision are
sure to be wrong and apt
to prove injurious.

There are no haphazard
methods in our tests.
Each test is of vital im-
portance and is made for
a reason.

Your eyes are made in our
care.

GLOBE
MASONIC TEMPLE.
A. A. ODEM, President
A. H. SCHADE, Sec. & Treas.
Consulting Optometrists

__________________________________
[advertisement for Piedmont Savings]

A Seed and
a Dollar

A seed that is not planted
will not grow.

A dollar that is neither
banked nor invested will not
increase.

A farmer looks forward to a
harvest time only because of
his planting—is it not so?

We invite you to bank with us.

PIEDMONT SAVINGS
& INVESTMENT
COMPANY

GREENVILLE, S. C.
Capital and Surplus $[210?],000.
__________________________________
[advertisement for City National Bank]

Merry
Christmas.
City
National
Bank.

__________________________________
[advertisement for Furniture Exchange]

WE HAVE BOUGHT

The J. C. Peare stock of new Fur-
niture and rented his store, 200 S.
Main St. Will sell cheap or exchnge
new goods for old.

FURNITURE EXCHANGE,
C. H. CLYDE, Manager
Phone 1424 or 1137.

__________________________________
[advertisement for W. R. Hale jewelry]

We have suitable
presents for the new
year, a beautiful size
solid gold Cameo
Brooch $8.00.

W. R. HALE.
__________________________________
[advertisement for Gus. Katsulis]

GUS. KATSULIS,
118 E. Washington St.
Best Fruits of All Kinds.

Fresh California Fruits,
fruits in baskets, nuts, rai-
sins and other delicacies in
this line. Call and See us.
__________________________________
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
__________________________________
Office 742 PHONES Residence 842
DR. W. E. SCOTT,
OSTEOPATH.

[column 2]

[advertisement for Craig Rush furniture, spans cols. 2-4]

RESTWELL SILK FLOSS MATTRESS

We are exclusive agents for this Mattress, they weigh about half as much as the ordinary Mat-
tress, which makes them easy to handle. Satisfaction guranteed or money refunded price $15.00

CRAIG RUSH FURNITURE CO. The One Price Cash Store
__________________________________
DR. J. H. MAXWELL,
GREENVILLE, DIED
IN ATLANTA TODAY

-----------o----------
EMINENT PHYSICIAN AND CLUB
RESIDENT HAD BEEN IN
FAILING HEALTH

-----------o----------
REMAINS WILL BE BROUGHT
HERE FOR BURIAL SATURDAY

-----------o----------
Funeral Services Will be Held To-
morrow Afternoon at 2:30 o'clock
From the First Baptist Church of
Welch He was a Member since he
First Came to Greenville—[Scion?]
of Prominent Faith Leaves Large
Connection in this Section—Was Ill
in Home of Nephew in Atlanta

-----------o----------
Dr. John H. Maxwell, M. D. an
old and highly respected citizen of
Greenville who has a prominent family
[scattered throughout?] the state
die this morning at 1.30 o'clock in
Atlanta in the home of his nephew
G. T. Weyman. The remains will be
brought to Greenville Saturday morn-
ing at [3?] o'clock on the No. 56. The
funeral service will be held from
the First Baptist Church Saturday
afternoon at 2:30 o'clock and after
the service, which is to be [illegible]
by Dr. Geo. W. Quick [illegible]
[illegible] will follow immediately in
[Greenwood?] cemetery.

The [illegible] call be and
hopes to learn of Maxwell's
death, although he has been in
failing health for years and his death
was not [illegible]. He
was 88 years old on the 19th of the
onth. Complications with the in-
[fluence?] of old age caused his death.

Dr. Maxwell was the youngest son
of the late [illegible] Maxwell
and Elizabeth Fields [illegible]
[illegible]
Professor in Anderson county, on De-
cemter 19, [1802?]. He spend his early
boyhood in Pendleton where he re-
ceived his [illegible] education. At the
age of nineteen he entered the Uni-
versity of Virginia and commenced
on academic course preperatory to
the study of medicine. His last ses-
sion there was devoted to [torn] to the
study of nerval [torn] in the
Medical College of Pendleon, and
graduated there on [torn, illegible]
After [his return home?] he settled at
[illegible]
[illegible] the practice of [torn] with
his brother, Dr. Rob[ert?] [illegible] Maxwell.
After two years and [illegible] he
returned to his [torn]. His
health began to fail [torn]this rea-
son he moved to Greenville [torn] whole he
continued his practice [torn] to the
city until he was [torn, illegible]
[illegible]
health.

In 1890 he married [Miss?] Mary E.
Alexander of Pickens, [S. C.]. His wife pre-
ceded him to the grave but two
uears ago.

Dr. Maxwell was a member of the
Baptist chuch for more than sixty
years. He was a Knight of the poor and
prominently identified [with?] other fra-
ternal organizations. He was a
staunch Democrat and although he
never aspired for [illegible]
he was well advised in [illegible]
tional affairs.

Dr. Maxwell is survied by a large
family connection in Greenville.
-------------------------o-----------------------
POSTOFFICE HOURS
ON NEW YEAR DAY

-----------o----------
Tomorrow, January 1, being a na-
tional holiday, the postoffice will ob-
serve the following schedule.

The city carriers will make only
one delivery and collection, that their
usual morning delivery.

The collectors will make tbree col-
lections in the business section at
[9:30] a. m. - 5:30 p. m. and [3:00?] a. m.

The money order, register, [illegible]
and general delivery windows will
open at 8:00 a. m., and close at 12:00 m.
The office will be closed for the remain--
der of the day.

No delivery will be made by the
rural carriers.
-------------------------o-----------------------
SOME BUSINESS PLACES
WILL CLOSE TOMORROW

-----------o----------
Tomorrow, January 1, being a na-
tional holiday, the day will be observed
in Greenville by the postoffice, rail-
way freight offices, banks and some
other few institutions, but [illegible],
however, is not regarded as a holiday
by two mercantile establishments, the
cotton and stock exchanges will open
for the day.

Announcement was made today
that the C. & W. C., the L & N, and
the Southern railway freight offices
will be closed all day tomorrow, ex-
cept between 9 and ten o'clock in the
morning.
-------------------------o-----------------------
AN ERROR.

A mistake was made in the pub-
lished account of yesterday a tragedy
in Easley. The Piedmont reporter
was told that Mr. [Galloway?] had been
[cut off]

[column 3]

CONDITIONS AMONG WEAVERS
18 YEARS AGO AND TODAY

-----------o----------
Over 18 years ago, I came to Green-
ville, S. C., when one of the mills was
just starting up on three [harness?]
tape selvage goods. I made $5.00 a
week on eight of these looms, one
got good room and board for $2.00
to $2.50 per week. Today weavers
are running 24 looms on the same
goods for $8.00 per week, just three
times as many looms as I ran over
18 years ago for the same money,
and they pay $3.00 to $3.50 per week
for board.

Over 18 years ago, good flour was
$[3.00?] for 98 lbs. Today we pay $3.50
to $4.00 for 98 lbs. of good flour.

Meat is from 10 to 60 per cent
higher than it was 18 to 19 years ago
and weavers are working in the same
mill, in the same town and running
[three?] times as many looms, on the
same kind of goods for the same pay.

Over 21 years ago, I learned to
weave at Hope Mills, N. C. on apron
ginghams. Weavers made from
[$10.00 to $11.00?] per week on [4] looms
and got room and board for $1.75 per
week. Today weavers run 8 looms
on ginghams for $5.00 to $10.50 per
week, and pay $3.00 to $3.50 per week
for board.

The "rich are heaping treasure to-
gether for the last days"—James.

Go to now, ye rich men, weep and
howl for your miseries that shall
come upon you. Your riches are cor-
rupted. Your gold and silver is can-
kered; and the rust of them shall be
a witness against you, and shall eat
your flesh as it were fire. Ye have
heaped treasure together for the last
days. Behold, the hire of the labor-
ers who have reaped down your
fields, weave your cloth [illegible] you
looked on cloth that was purist the
high graded, which is of you kept
back by fraud, crieth: and the cries of
them which have reaped are enter-
ed into the ears of the Lord. Ye have
lived in pleasure on the earth. Ye
have condemned and killed the just;
and he doth have the way to
resist you." James says that where
we are there [illegible]
"The coming of the Lord draweth
nigh." James 5:1-7.
STEPHEN MERCER.
-------------------------o-----------------------
POLICE COURT.

Bernard McCaskell, who put up a
$50 bond last week for his appear-
ance in police court on a charge of
[illegible] was convicted today and
fined [$7.50?]. It was alleged that he
struck an old negro ["illegible"]. Af-
ter his conviction he preferred a
[illegible] change against the negro wo-
man, Henrietta Abarcrombie, which
the [illegible] flatly dismissed.

Gertrude [Loames?], tried on three
separate charges of drunk, disorderly
conduct and discharging a pistol, was
found guilty of the latter two charges
and fined $10 or 20 days in each case.

L. L. Todd, white, charged with em-
bezzlement.
-------------------------o-----------------------
FEAST OF THE CIRCUMCISION.

Tomorrow, January the first be-
ing the feast of the Circumcision of
Christ service with a celebration of
the Holy Communion wkll be held in
Christ church at 8 a. m. The rector
the Rev. Alexander R. Mitchell will
officiate.
-------------------------o-----------------------
And now they will be asking if the
French, wo are good enough to [illegible]
the English, are good enough to gov-
ern themselves.—The Pittsburgh Dis-
patch.
__________________________________________________________________
[advertisement for Williams Willis grocery, spans cols. 4-5, bottom section]

"PREPAREDNESS"
Against High Prices During the Year 1916, Should
be the Watchword of Every Housewife
in This Community.

HERE IS THE SOLUTION TO THE HIGH PRICE PROB-
LEM. Resolve that you will trade FOR CASH, and that you will
buy your GROCERIES from WILLIAMS-WILLIS COMPANY.

Compare our prices below, with what you are now paying by
the old time, worn, out of date CREDIT PLAN and see how we
are going to save you MANY DOLLARS during the NEW YEAR:


48 lbs. Patent Flour $1.50
24 lbs. Patent Flour 75c
18 lbs. Best Patent Flour [$1.05?]
34 lbs. Best Patent Flour 85c
Pure Hog Lard, bulk 12c lb.
Best Compound Lard, bulk 11c lb.
Pure Hog Lard, 20-lb. buckets (in wood) $2.15
Pure Hog Lard, 10-lb. buckets $1.25
Pure Hog Lard, 5-lb. buckets 65c
25 lbs. Fine Granulated Sugar $1.65
Our "W. & W." Special Blend Coffee, worth 30 cents [20c?]
Lot of Candies to close out, worth 25c 15c lb.
Choice Florida Oranges 20c dozen
Bananas 15c dozen
Large, [illegible], juicy Grape Fruit, three for 25c
Irish Potatoes, per peck 25c
Sweet Potatoes (Nancy Hall), per peck 25c
10 lbs. Snowdrift Lard $1.20
5 lbs. Snowdrift Lard 60c
Best Corn Meal, per peck 25c
Broken Rice, real good, 20 lbs. for $1.00
Best [Full?] Head Rice, 14 lbs. for $1.00
7 [bean?] Cold Hand Snap 25c
6 [illegible] Argo Startch 25c
8 Boxes Searchlight Matches 10c
Sugar House Molasses, per gallon 50c
[illegible] Molasses, per gallon 50c
Fine House-Made Sorghum, per gallon 50c
5 gallons Kerosene Oil 25c
3 boxes Oat Meal [25c?]
3 boxes Grape Nuts 25c
2 boxes Shredded Wheat [15c?]
3 cans Big Hominey 15c
3 cans Sauer Kraut 15c
3 cans Condensed Milk 25c
3 cans Pet Milk (baby size) 25c
Yield Club Dressing, very fine, per bottle 25c
3 [illegible] Jelly, best varieties 25c
PROMPT DELIVERY TO ALL PARTS OF THE CITY
WILLIAMS-WILLIS CO.

[cut off]

[column 4]

SPECIAL A. R. P. MEETING
ON THE SABBATH MORNING

-----------o----------
At the A. R. P. meeting place in
the Central high school square there
will be a special program of services
Sabbath morning beginning at 10.00.
a. m. It will be a combined service
in which special [stress?] will be laid
upon the Bible teaching service of
the church. Among those who will
take part are Mr. D. B. Webb, gen-
eral secretary of the South Carolina
Sunday School Association and Ex-
Gov. Ansel. The whole service will
last but one and one half hour. Those
who are interested in Sunday school
work will hear with pleasure Prof.
Webb and Mr. Ansel. Mr. Webb has
only recently taken charge of the in-
terdenominational work of the state,
but in this short time he has shown
his knowlege and skill as a man of
work. This is to be organization day
for the A. R. P. Sabbath school of
the city. New officers will be [chosen?]
and installed, and it is hoped that all
of the A. R. P's. of the city will be
present. The exercises will be also
introducing to the general public, Mr.
McAulay the pastor of the A. R. P.
church here who had been out of the
city for the holidays has returned
and will also speak on the [illegible]. He
will also preach in the evening at
7.30.
-------------------------o-----------------------
DEATH OF MRS. MOORE.

Mrs. Pansy Moore, widow of the
late Washington Moore, who lived on
the Spartanburg road, about six
miles from Greenville, died [illegible] and
[illegible] yesterday afternoon. Mrs.
Moore was the daughter of the late Mr.
and Mrs. E. K. Robison, and was a
life-long resident of Greenville. She
is survived by two sisters, Mrs. R. D.
[Garrett?] and Mrs. Mamie Rodgers
and one son, William Moore, besides
grandchildren, nieces and nephews.

Her funeral will be held at [Grace?]
church this afternoon at [3?]
o'clock.
-------------------------o-----------------------
Uncle Joe Cannon says he looks
for a lively session of congress. This
sounds more like a threat than a
prediction.—Detroit Free Press.
-------------------------o-----------------------
MARKETS
Liverpool & New York Cotton.
Furnished by J. C. Watkins & Co.,
305 News Building.

WEATHER
-----------o----------
NEW YORK COTTON


Open High Low Close
Jan. 12.30 12.25 12.19 12.2[5?]
Mar 12.18 12.52 12.42 12.48
May 12.67 12.75 12.67 12.69
July 12.82 12.80 12.82 12.86
Aug. 12.45 12.54 12.46 12.48
LIVERPOOL COTTON

Liverpool [sports?] 7.92
Sales 10.00[0?]

Open Close Previous Close
Jan-Feb 7.70½
Mar-Apr 7.70
May-June 7.60
July-Aug 7.50
Oct-Nov 7.[45?]
[column 5]

BANKS AND MILLS
PAYING DIVIDENDS
IN SUM $275,000

-----------o----------
SEMI-ANNUAL CHECKS FOR
SHARE IN PROFITS BE
MAILED OUT TONIGHT.

-----------o----------
USUAL DIVIDENDS BY BANKS;
SOME OF THE MILLS ARE SHY

-----------o----------
Large Amount of Money will be Put
in Circulation by Payment of Divi-
dends to Hundreds of Stockholders
in This Vicinity — Some of the
Mills and Banks Have Already
Divided With the Stockholders —
Banks and Business Houses Re-
port Successful Year.

-----------o----------
Saturday, the first day of the New
Year, will be a cheerful one for
stockholders in many of the banks
and textile enterprises of the city [illegible]
[illegible], for checks in payment of [illegible]
semi-annual dividend will be mailed
out by these instituions tonight, for
past six months has been a period of
general prosperity and [illegible]
[illegible] to the same peiod of last year,
and good business has been enjoyed
generally by the various business
houses and manufacturing enterprises
of the section.

Dividend checks approximating
$275,000 will be issued by Greenville
city and county banking associations,
cotton mills and miscellaneous enter-
prices [illegible] to the close of the
[blurry] period—July 1 to Decem-
ber 31—While practicall all the divi-
dend paying institutions will make
their regular disbursements of enor-
mous, there are others which have been
[illegible] to pass upp the dividend for this
period, owing to the slow restoration
of normal conditions which became
depressed at the outbreak of the Eu-
ropean war. Mills producing certain
kinds of goods, not practically unat-
tractive under prevailing conditions
and had a hard [illegible] is [illegible].
They are carrying heavy [section?]
goods, however, which will find a
market [illegible] a change of conditions.

The following is the list of the
mills which have definately decided to
issue dividends:

Mills Manufacturing Company, [3?] per
cent, on [illegible] semi-annual,
last payment a per cent of $[illegible].

American Spinning Company, [5?] per
cent on 350,000 common [stock?]
$250,000 and preferred semi-annual; last
payment [3?] per cent on $3[50?],000 com-
mon; 3 1-2 on $250,000 preferred.

Piedmont Manufacturing Company
[?] per cent on $[3?],000,000, last payment
4 per cent on $1,000,000.

Greenville Banks

Fourth National a per cent on
[$100,00?], semi-annual. Last payment
3 per cent on $400,000.

[Branton?] Savings Bank: 4 per cent,
on $10,000 semi-annual. Last pay-
ment, 4 per cent on $10,000.

Piedmont Savings & Investment
Company: 4 per cent on $412,000;
semi-annual. Last payment, 4 per
cent, on $132,000.

The Peoples Bank: 2 per cent on
$200,000, quarterly payments. Last
payment, 2 per cent, on $200,000.

Farmers and Merchants Bank: 3 per
cent, on $50,000 semi annually. Last
payment, 3 per cent on $75,000.

Bank of Commerce: 3 1-2 per cent
on $100,000, semi-annual. Last pay-
ment, 3 1/2 per cent on $100,000.

First National Bank: 5 per cent, on
$100,000 semi-annual. Last payment
[5?] per cent on $100,000.

Bank of Simpsonville, 5 per cent
annual on $28,000, $1,810.
-------------------------o-----------------------
HAYNES' SABBATH SERVICES
BE HELD IN MAULDIN BLDG.

-----------o----------
The regular Sabbath services which
heretofore Evangelist Carlyle R..
Haynes has been conducting in Chi-
mora auditorium, tomorrow morning
will be held in the hall on the third
floor of the Mauldin building at
Main and Washington streets. This
change in location has been brought
about in [illegible] the convenience of the
majority of those who attend these
services.

Sabbath school will begin at ten
o'clock Saturday morning, and Mr.
Haynes will preach at 11 o'clock. His
subject at that time will be "Pray-
er."

Mr. Haynes' Sunday night service
will be held as usual at Chimera audi-
torium, beginning at 7:30 o'clock. At
this service on Sunday night he will
deliver an address on the subject of
"The Humanity of Christ."
-------------------------o-----------------------
[advertisement for Famers and Merchants Bank]

Deposits made in our Dime Savings
Department on or before January 5th
draw interest from January 1st,
Farmers and Merchants Bank.

_________________________________
CLASSIFIED ADS.
TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY.

_________________________________
LADY—Desires any king of an of-
fice position, understands bookkeep-
ing, stenography, typewriting and all
kinds of general office work. Ad-
dress P. O. Box 21, City, 12-31 Stx.

_________________________________
LOST—Dec. 31st, on Pendleton
street, between Memminger and Post
office, one cherry rocker, a bunch of
keys, and six silver teaspoons "M"
engrave on five and Elizabeth on
one. These articles were lost from
a wagon while moving. Finder will
be rewarded by returning same to
[illegible] 12-31 ltx.

[column 6]

[advertisement for Smith & Bristow, spans cols. 6-7]

RAIN COATS

Nothing will serve and protect you [bet-]
ter than one of our
RAIN COATS.
Every one of them is in good form. S[ome]
are three quarter length, others full len[gth.]
A good Rain coat is worth far more [than]
its cost in the way of clothes protec[tion.]
We have them beginning at $5.00 [and]
up to $15.00

SMITH & BRISTOW
_________________________________
[advertisement for Southeastern Life, spans cols. 6-7]

A NEW DRUG STOR[E]
On The Corner

of Washington and Richard-
son Streets would pay--just
across the corner from two
hoels with no other Drug
store near. This corner for rent.

APPLY TO
SOUTHEASTERN LIFE INS. C[O.]
_________________________________
J. C. McCALL OPERATED
UPON FOR APPENDICITIS

-----------o----------
J. C. McCall, former police commis-
sioner, was resently operated upon
for appendicities at Dr. [illegible] and
Lathem. His friends will be glad to
learn that he is improving stead-
ily.
-------------------------o-----------------------
CITY OFFICE TO CLOSE

The office of the city clerk and
treasurer will be closed Saturday be-
cause that day is a legal holiday.
________________________________________________
[advertisement for Harris Spring Water, spans cols. 6-7]

HARRIS SPRING WATER

The clean, pure mineral water is a genuine plea[s-]
ure at meals, and makes health a habit. Keeps y[ou]
feeling bright and cheerful.

Bottled with every sanitary precautions as it [bub-]
bles from its bed of rock at the beautiful Har[cut off]
Spring, in South Carolina. For sale by

HARRIS SPRING WATER COMPANY
________________________________________________
[advertisement for Royal Restaurant, spans cols. 6-7]

EAT AT ROYAL RESTAURAN[T]
Where the meals are always delight-
ful, the service splendid and the prices
as reasonable as one can expect on
good and pure food.

MEET ME THERE TONIGHT.
ROYAL RESTAURANT
Phone 857
111 W. Washington

________________________________________________
[advertisement for Pepsi-Cola, spans cols. 6-7]

[image of two men drinking Cola at sports event]
"Bob—this is
SOME thirst-quencher"

SOME thirst-quencher is right! The most in-
vigorating games are well worth the energy if
followed by a cool glass of Pepsi-Cola.

Not only delicious and wholesome, but in-
vigorating at all times—after contests of
brain or brawn. And in the home it has
the same appetizing and comfort-giving
effects. You can get it at the fountain—
or carbonated in
bottles, at your
grocer's.

PEPSI-COLA

[column 7, middle section]

[advertisement for Doster Bros. Co.]

A SERIOUS LOSS
is loss of appetite.

Meritol Adapa[cut off]
TRADE MARK
TONIC DIGESTIV[E]

sharpens your appetite, aids [cut off]
tier, improves the health, and
strength and vigor. Sold only [cut off]
$1.00.

Doster Bros. & Brace Co.
Greenville, S. C.
_________________________________
[advertisement for The Piedmont ads]

Don't put off inserting that [cut off]
ad. Phone it now.

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