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[across all columns]
EIGHT GREENVILLE DAILY PIEDMONT, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 31, 1915.

[column 1]

[headline, spans cols. 1-5]
AT THE THEATRES

[photo of scene from movie A Battle Cry of Peace, spans cols. 1-3]
A scene from "The Battle Cry of Peace" at the Grand Today—Matinee and night and January 1st
and 3rd with matinees daily at 3:30 p. m.

[headline, spans cols. 1-2]
AT THE GRAND
BATTLE CRY OF PEACE.

----------o----------
Three Days, Beginning Today, Dec.
31, Matinee 2:30; Night 8:30 p. m.

The public and press have given
"The Battle Cry of Peace" a reception
unique to the annals of motion pic-
tures. Here are brief comments by
the dramatic critics of the New York
newspapers.

"The Uncle Tom's Cabin of pic-
tures"—[Zo?], New York Evening Journal.

"Greatest war drama ever filmed,"
—Charles Henry Meltzer, New York
American.

"Thrills by the Yard,"—Haywood
Brone, N. Y. Tribune.

"Far transcended anything [blurry]
atted play could present," [Lock?] V.
DeFoe, N. Y. World.

"Charles [Rickman?] superb," John
Logan, N. Y. Herald.

"Wealth of interesting [blurry],"—
Alexander Wolcott, N. Y. Times.

"Thrilling pictures of the [seige?' of
New York," Lawrence [blurry], N.
Y. Sun.

"Picture more to [blurry]—
N. Y. Press

"A magnificent and sensational
performance,"—Harold Wolf, N. Y.
Morning Telegraph.

"A big [blurry] in a big way,"
Charles Daunton, Evening World.

"Story so well told, to what [illegible]
cannot fail to make [illegible] life
long innocense,"—Gilbert Wech, N.

[article continues on column 2]

Y. Evening Telegram.

[photo of a scene in The Battle Cry of Peace]
A scene from "The Battle Cry
if Peace" at the Grand Dec. 31,
Jan. 1 and 3.

"Picture one of the first [eve-
nings?],"—Frank Pope, N. Y. Journal
of Commerce.

"Something new in motion pic-
tures,"—[Bette Jesetle?], N. Y. [blurry]
Mail.

"An extraordinary Gem,"—N. Y.
Evening Sun.

"Pictures and production striking-
ly [painted?],"—N. Y. Evening Post.

"The Battle Cry of Peace" has
proved [illegible] and the Vita-
graph theatre will [illegible] to other at-
tractions for a long time to come,"—
N. Y. Evening Globe.

[return to column 1, bottom section]

[Headline, spans cols. 1-2, bottom section]
Moving Pictures

AT THE CASINO
MOVING PICTURES

COMING ATTRACTIONS AT
THE CASINO

Monday—"The Golden Claw"
featuring Bessie Barriscale
Tuesday—"The Best of Enemies"
Weber and Fields.
Wednesday—"Janitor's Wife's
Temptation," All Star Key-
stone Cast.
Thursday—"Double Trouble"
Featuring Douglas Fairbanks.
The remainder of program an-
nounced later.

MUTUAL MASTERPICTURE SAT-
URDAY.

Audrey Munson, the celebrated ac-
tress will be seen at the Casino Sat-
turday in "Inspiration." This pic-
ture is considered one of the best
Mutual masterpictures released. This
is a large extenet true to life, and
is well worth seeing. A comedy will
be shown in connection with this pic-
ture. The synopsis of "Inspiration"
is as follows:

The cast: Audrey Munson, Thomas

[article continues on column 2, bottom section]
A. [Corres?], George [illegible], Bert [De-
lanty?].

A young sculpter and [illegible]
[illegible]
[paragraph mostly illegible]
willingly concedes to give the girl
an opportunity. When she takes the
grand stand, she falls into the [??]
which is that of the model of his
[??].

Her fame spreads through the
colony and she has many opportuni-
ties to pose. At first she does so
unwillingly, for she cares only to
pose for the young artist. He urges
her to, however, and she does. She
is the model for Daniel Chester
French's statue "Evangeline," now in
front of Longfellow's home in [blurry]
bridge. Next she poses for "History"
for Allan Newman, which tops the
state capitol of Florida. Whe com-
petitors and contracts for art work
for the Panable-Pacific exposition

[photo of actress, probably Audrey Munson, spans cols. 1-2]

[column 3]

are announced, and work is begun by
New York's artists, she again is
sought after eagerly, and is the mod-
el for Adolph Weinman's "Descend-
ing Night," Mrs. Harry Payne Whit-
ney's "Fountain of Eldorado," Daniel
Chester French's "Genius of Crea-
tion" and many others.

When the statue for which she
poses for the young artist is finished,
she realizes that she loves him. But
she thinks that he cares for some of
his society girls who have frequent-
ly visited his studio, so she goes
away, leaving him a note. For the
first time, the artist knows that he
loves the model. He searches for her,
but cannot find her. Then he gives
up, and goes out into the city to look
at her in the works of art in which
her face and figure have been used as
a model—to the "Firemens Monu-
ment," The [Pellter?] Memorial, the
Williamsburg bridge, the municipal
building—finally to the Maine mon-
ument at Columbus circle.

There he really finds her, crumpled
and exhausted at the base, just out
of the hospital, where she has been
since and ill since she left him. And
now the story ends, the two will
leave together to visit the exposition
at San Francisco before they return
to settle down for life in Bohemia.

At The Bijou
RED CIRCLE BEGINS MONDAY.

Monday at the Bijou the new serial,
"The Red Circle," will be shown; this
is the first installment of this serial.
"The Red Circle" was written by the
celebrated author, Albert Payton
Terhune. Mr. Terhune has written
many other stories for Pathe, but
this is considered one of his best. The
Red Circle is a remarkable story
dealing with the inherited instinct for
[blurry] otherwise charming girl.
The title of the story refers to a
peculiar birthmark which is a char-
acteristic of her family, and which
comes and goes according as her
thoughts are normal or abnormal.
The Red Circle has been produced
by the Pathe Company featuring
Ruth Roland, who formerly played
Red in "Who's Guilty" serial and
Frank Mayo, the popular movie films
stars. This picture is in 14 install-
ments and will be shown every Mon-
day. The programs by day are an-
nounced elsewhere in this paper.
These programs seem to get better
and better. Two other features of
this very movie house are the Coun-
try Store on Thursday nights and the
splendid music that is given to the
patrons by the Bijou orchestra. Re-
member that the Bijou is the home
of good music and fine pictures, and
the price remains 5c and 10c.

At The Majestic
TABLOID & MOVING PICTURES

CONTINUE TO PLEASE.

With tomorrow's performances
bring to a close the week's engagement
of Dale Newman and the Tabarin
Girls at the Majestic. The company
have had the approval of the [blurry]
with every bill they'e presented.

The reason is that they have a great
[blurry] of singers and dancers and
have presented nothing but good
silent musical comedy that has been
enjoyed. [blurry] evverybody that has seen
it. The Waiters' Union is the title
of the bill that is to be presented to-
night, and is another bill that will
[blurry] as it is made of laugh after
laugh. The two comedians continue
to [blurry] and it is expected that they
will even surprise themselves in this
bill.

The musical numbers are very
witty and are as follows:

[Code? Gods?] in My Heart—Curtis Hawley.
Jelly Roll—Irving Selig.
[blurry]—Marion McCormack.
Old Fashioned Melody—Curtis Hawley.
Cake Walk—Marion McCormack.
________________________________________
[advertisement]

Save Money
[remainder of column too dark to transcribe]

[column 4]

[headline, spans cols. 4-5]

IN MOVIE LAND
Pathe Dope
Pathe Acquires Henry W. Savege's
Plays.

The first to be "Madame X" and
"Excuse Me."

Right on top of the announcement
of the acquisition by Pathe of the A.
H. Woods plays comes the news that
the same house has purchased the
rights to Henry W. Savage's great
list of theatrical successes. Mr. Sav-
age has to his credit some of the
most popular productions of the time,
and two at least:—"Madame X" and
"Excuse Me" holds records as being
the most successful drama and farce
respectively of recent years. "Every-
woman" also has a great name
for herself.

The first two mentioned plays have
already been filmed under the direc-
tion of Geo. F. Marion who originally
produced them, and who has been Mr.
Savage's chief producer for the past
fifteen years. Practically the entire
original sets were used in these pic-
tures. Dorothy Donnelley starring in
"Madame X" and Geo. F. Marion in
"Excuse Me." Both pictures will be
placed upon Pathe's Gold Rooster Pro-
gram in the near future. "Madame
X," which was written by Alexander
Bisson, enjoyed the tremendous run of
seven seasons, and for eighteen weeks
in New York, played to an average of
$20,000 weekly. It proved to be as
popular on tour as it was in the
metropolis, and many theatre mana-
gers remember it as the biggest at-
traction they ever played. It will be
released in six parts. "Excuse Me"
ran for four seasons, a phenomenal
record for a comedy-drama. It was
written by Rupert Hughes and will be
released in five parts.

Among other famous Savage
productions which before long may be
seen in pictures are "The Shogun,"
"Little Boy Blue," "King Dodo," "Maids of
Athens," "Woodland," "Somewhere
Else," "Peggy from Paris," and the
"Prince of Pilsen" (operas) and
"Common Sence Brackett?" "Behold
Thy Wife," "Along Came Ruth," "The
Stolen Story," and "Miss Patsy"
(dramas).

Mr. Savage was (and is) one of
Boston's most prominent business
men before embarking in the theatri-
cal business. It is said that it was
by mere accident that the went into it.
If true it was a lucky accident for the
amusement world for he applied to
his new business the same high prin-
ciples what won him fame in a more
commercial calling.
----------o----------
The Wharton's have procured the
famous old-time play, "Hazel Kirke,"
the popularity of which is perrenial,
and used a fine cast, including be-
sides Pearl White, Bruce McRae, who
starred in Pathe's "Via Wireless" [I.?]
Creighton Hale, William Riley Hatch,
Eddie O'Connor, and Allen Marsane.
"Hazel Kirke" has been put upon
Pathe's Gold Rooster Programs.
----------o----------
Mary Pickford's only starring ve-
hicle is The Foundling, a Famous
Playets-Paramount picture, which
presents a story of of beautiful senti-
ments and tender appeal in the [blurry]
senses. The Foundling epitomizes in
a strongly dramatic manner the suf-
ferings of a girl cast out into the
world by the hatred of her father,
because her birth has caused the
death of the wife he had loved and
worshipped.
----------o----------
Widely known as a dramatist, ac-
tor and stage director, Paul Dickey
has left New York for the Jesse L.
Lasky Feature Play company studios
at Hollywood, Cal, to begin work as
one of the Lasky directors. He will
undertake a production on his arri-
val, his first photo-play being a pic-
turization of the big stare success
The Trail of the Lonesome. Fine
Miss Charlotte Walker will be the
star and the features will be released
through Paramount Picture corpor-
ations.

Edison Dope

A Romance of the Middle Ages.

Mabel Trunnelle Edison, since
war began, has been besiged by mail
by an ardent English admirer and an
equally enthusiastic German admirer.
Each has his own way of advancing
his cause but they are particularly
desirous of keeping her favorable to
one side or the other. It is now some
time since she heard from the Eng-
lishman, but the German continues to

[blurry] her with German newspa-
pers—which she can't read—to prove
[remainder of column too dark to read]

[photo, too dark]

[article continues on column 5, top section]

the light of the latest news that all
of Germany's men, except the old
men, have been called to the front,
and considering that the German ad-
mirer continues to reside at the same
address, Miss Trunnelle has resigned
herself to her fate—that her admirer,
so fired with the ardor of youth
though he be—in his letters—is a
decrepit, old man. So doth the ro-
mance of life "fade into" a dream.
----------o----------
Viola Dana, Edison, the Child.

One of the most amusing sights—
and a familiar one—about the Edison
studio is the sight of Viola Dana, the
little Edison star, sitting with [blurry]
blurry] ease and languor the while some
actress rubs her head in rythmic mo-
tion. This sleepy restful fingering of
the scalp is well known to all mothers
as a great quieter when baby's nerves
get on edge or when she wishes to
put it to sleep. The situation is one
of [blurry] exhibiting, in this [diminative]
leading lady, striking traits of the
little girl who will not "grow up."
Luckily it is due to this child nature
that Miss Dana is able to picture so
appealingly her famous little girl im-
personation. To be asked "to make
her sleepy" is the sure mark of the

[photo of Dave Newman's Tabarin Girls, spans cols. 5-6, middle section]
A Bench of Dave Newman's Taborin Girlies at the Majestic

little actress's affectionate regard
and, in her own words, she'd give
anything any time to have her head
[illegible].
----------o----------
[ Edison Leading Women Meet Naval
Officers.

Twelve of the Edison leading wo-
men were invited to be honor guests
at a dinner and dance given to twelve
naval officers, at the Essex County
Country Club near West Orange, N.
J. Thursday evening (the 18th). The
officers have been stationed at the
Edison Storage Battery Company's
plant, studying the use of the battery.
The Edison ladies were invited by
Dr. Miller Reese Butchison, chief
engineer and personal representative
of Mr. Thomas A. Edison. The in-
vited guests were: Miriam Nesbitt,
Viola Dana, Mabel Trunnelle, [Leslie?]
[Flugrath?], Carrol McComas, Sally
Crute, Helen Fulton, Grace Williams,
the Misses Pratt, Miss Graham and
Jean Dumar. Mrs. Thomas A. Edison
[chaproned] the party.

Paramount Dope

"The Trail of the Lonesome Pine"
will be [picturised?] from Eugena Wal-
ber's play based on the popular novel
of the same name by John Fox, Jr.
The motion picture rights were ob-
tained last week by Samual Goldfish,
executive head of the Lasky-Para-
mount company, from Messrs. [Klaw?]
and Erlanger, just prior to Mr. Gold-
fish's departure for a winter trip to
the Lasky studios. Charlotte Wal-
ker, who will be the star, has already
appeared successfully to two Lasky-
Paramount productions. They are
"Kindling" and "Out of Darkness."
----------o----------
Victor Moore, the Lasky-Paramount
star, has acquired a valet. An Eng-
lish valet, at that. In his California
bungalow the star of "Chimmie Fad-
en" has about as much use for val-
et as a certain Pacific coast [illegible] has
for a pair of boxing gloves. Mr. Moore
looks upon his [blurry] as an as-
set and not a liability.
----------o----------
[remainder of column too dark to transcribe]

[article continues on column 6, top section]

Players-Paramount production will be
released on January 24th.
----------o----------
The Jesse L Lasky Feature Play
company has re-engaged Blanche
Street for a long term, to appear in
Lasky-Paramount pictures, according
to announcement made this week by
Samuel Goldfield, executive head of
the company, on the eve of his start-
ing for the Lasky studios at Holly-
wood, Cal.
----------o----------
Forrest Stanley, who is repeating
his success on the stage as one of the
best known and most capable men in
this category at the studio of the Ma-
urice-Paramount company, pays out
as much as the average man's salary
in a year for clothes in a few months,
[less?] then the last four years Stanley
has paid Los Angeles tailors $4,000
and numbers his [illegible] two score.
He has always been known as one of
the most correctly and quietly dress-
ed men of the stage.
--------------------o--------------------
CLEAN UP THE ORCHARD.

Farmers do not, as a rule realize
the value of cleaning up the orchard
during winter. Many insects and fun-
ges diseases which would make trou-
ble the following season can be de-
stroyed in the cold months.

First remove all trash and [illegible] in
the clay destroying the insects that
are lying dormant. Then remove
from the orchard all [blurry] fruit.
Old, rotten peaches, apples, [blurry]
and other fruits, whether in the tree
or on the ground contain millions of
spores which are [illegible]
diseases to the next crop of fruit.

An order of much that it [illegible]
received by Clemson College is to
prune the orchard, clear it of
trash, and there [blurry] thorough

[article continues on column 7, top section]

Such a system will aid materially in
the production of a perfect crop of
fruit the following season.

[return to column 6, bottom section]

[advertisement for Meritol]

Meritol
ADAPA
Trade Mark\
RHEUMATISM POW-
DERS.

are for a single purpose, Rheu-
matism in its various forms. If
troubled with rheumatism, try them
on our guarantee. Sold only by us,
50c and $1.00.

Doster Bros. & Brace Co.
Greenville, S. C.

_____________________________________
It pays to give Want Ads for [blurry]
bring quick results. Phone 850.

____________________________________________________
[advertisement for Bijou Theater, spans cols. 6-7, bottom section]

COMING ATTRACTIONS AT THE BIJOU
FOR WEEK OF JANUARY 3.

[left column]
MONDAY
BIOGRAPH
"WEAVER OF CLARYBANK"
Two reel drama.

ESSENAY
"FABLE OF THE HANDSOME
JETHRO WHO WAS SIMPLY CUT
OUT TO BE A MERCANT"
One Reel Comedy

EDISON
"CARTOONS ON YACHT"
One Reel

PATHE
First chapter of
"THE RED CIRCLE"

TUESDAY.
LUBIN
"THE GHOST OF THE TWISTED
OAK."
Three Reel Drama

[HICA?]
"AN EYE TOO MANY"
One Reel Comedy
Two Other Good Subjects.

WEDNESDAY
KALEM
"THE KIDNAPPED HEIRESS."
One Reel Drama.

VITAGRAPH
"ROMANTIC HUGGIN' "
One Reel Comedy.

BIOGRAPH
"THE GOD WITHIN"
One Reel Comedy

[remainder of column too dark to transcribe]

[right column]

PATHE
"WHO PAYS?"
Pathe Sermon.

THURSDAY

ESSANAY
"THE SECOND SON"
Three Reel Drama.

KALEM
"THE HOODOO'S BUSY DAY"
One Reel Comedy

KALEM
"A DOUBLE IDENTITY"
Two Reel Drama

FRIDAY
KALEM
"THE PITFALL"
Four Reel Drama.
"DIAMOND FROM THE SKY"
$10,000 Serial.

SATURDAY

BIOGRAPH
"MAN AND HIS MASTER"
Two Reel Drama

KALEM
"HAM THE ICEMAN"
One reel Comedy

VITAGRAPH
"THE GYPSY TRAIL"
Two Reel Drama

[blurry]
"THE TENDERFOOT THE
[blurry]
One Reel Comedy

[remainder of column too dark to transcribe]

[return to column 7, second article]

Wise.
Mrs. Blake—"There's hardly any
living with my husband; he doesn't
know anything." Mrs. Winks—
"There's no living at all with my
husband; he knows it all."—Indiana-
polis Star.
__________________________________
[advertisement for Grand Opera House]
GRAND OPERA HOUSE
Three Days Commencing
Friday, Dec. 31st, with
Matinee 3:30 p. m.

The Battle Cry
of Peace

In the production are 25,000 Na-
tional Guardsmen; 800 members of
[illegible] G. A. R.; 800 horses, 8,000 Super-
[illegible]ries and Hudson Maxine., the
[illegible].

See New York fall into the hands
of [illegible] and the destruction
[illegible].

[illegible] now selling. Prices
Matinee for 25c, 35c, 50c, 75c.
Night 25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00.
Daily Matinee at 3.30 P. M.
Night performance 8.30 P. M.
__________________________________
[advertisement for The Majestic]

AT THE MAJESTIC
Dave Newman
Tabarin Girls
Present
"The Waiters' Union"

Large Chorus of Pretty Girls
Good Comedians
New Songs

Matinee 10c and 15c.
Night 10c and 20c.

__________________________________
[advertisement for The Casino]

At The CASINO
TODAY

VICTOR UNIVERSAL [illegible]
Presents
Mary Fuller and Paul Panzer
in
"The Tale of the (C)
Three Reel Drama

IMP UNIVERSAL
"When Love Laughs"
One Reel Comedy [illegible]

Phone 946. [illegible]
Prices 5c and 10c.
__________________________________
[advertisement for The Garing]

AT THE GARING
TODAY.

Hazel Daws

TOMORROW.
Lillian Lorraine in
"Should a Wife Forgive."

Special Monday
Geraldine Farrar in
"CARMEN"

Phone 1922.

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