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[across all columns]
TEN GREENVILLE DAILY PIEDMONT, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 31, 1915.

[column 1]

[advertisement for Gilbreath-Durham Co.]

We recommend
the well known
PERFECTION
Oil Heater

and are still pre-
pared to furnish
a full line of sizes.

Prices from
$3.50 to $5.50

Gilbreath-Durham Co.
208-210 South Main
_____________________________________
[advertisement for Barr Dry Goods]

New
Year
Greeting!

For Thirty Four Years, This house
has been the home of bargains and we
take this opportunity of thanking our
friends far and near for the confidence
that they impose in us and the liberal
patronage that they have bestowed
upon us, assuring them, that during
1916 it will be our earnest endeavor
to serve them even better than in the
past.

To Close Out We offer fifty men's
suits valued at $15.00 for $8.50.
Suits valued at $18 to go at $16.00.

Money Saver on ladies' Coat Suits
and Cloaks. We have a few left that
were are giving 1-3 off, this is your
chance to get a Coat Suit or Coat
way under value.

One Thousand Yards of fine soft
Cambric percales 15c value, new year
price 10c yard—case spring styles
dress gingham best grade 10c yrd.

Remnants, a table full of remnants
and short lengths in, Ginghams, Flan-
elettes, Outings and Suitings way un-
der value—big lot of curtain [scrim?] in
remnants at half price.

Five Pieces of 50 inch Shephard
Plaid suiting, January price 25c yrd.
New year prices on Blankets and
Comforts. A good blanket 75c pair, a
a heavy wam comfort $1.00.

BARR DRY GOODS CO.
"SELLS IT FOR CASH"
114-116 South Main St.

_____________________________________
[advertisement for Ladies' Quality Shop]

The Sale of Suits
Continued.

Reduced from
1-3 to 1-2.

Received large ship-
ment of our celebra-
ted
$1.95 Waists.

All colors, all sizes
and styles.

LADIES'
Quality Shop.
The Home of Authentic
Styles.
S. Main. Phone 424.

_____________________________________
[advertisement for Jno. O. Greshem]

Estimate furnished within
twenty-four hours after
Receipt of Plans
JNO O. GRESHAM
General Contractor
PHONE 209.

_____________________________________
[advertisement for Bridges Co.]

SPECIAL:

Ladies' bronze kid button and lace
[hoses?] in good range sizes and widths,
$4.50 the pair, finest quality.

[J.?] D. BRIDGES CO.
[cut off]

[column 2]

[advertisement for Carpenter Bros.]

The best place to buy
Fine Cigars and Tobac-
cos, Cigarettes, Turkish
all kinds.

Carpenter Bros.
Agency Tanlac.

_____________________________________
BENSON, PARDONED
BY BLEASE, SHOOTS
PREACHER AND SON

----------o----------
B. D. TALLEY AND SON BARNEY
FIRED UPON IN PUBLIC
ROAD AT TRAVELERS
REST.

----------o----------
SHERIFF RECTOR AND POSSE
IN PURSUIT OF CRAZED MAN

----------o----------
Ernest Who it Thought to Have Been
Temporarily Insane Fired Five
shots in Rapid Succession at Tal-
ley and His Son Who Were in Bug-
gy—They Received Flesh Wounds
—Benson Thought to be Hiding in
Weeds and it is Feared That he
will Shoot Others.

----------o----------
Sheriff Rector leading a posse
of deputies and citizens scoured
the surrounding woods around
Travelers Rest in the hope of
finding Ernest Benson who is be-
lieved to be hiding in the woords
ready to start trouble for his pur-
suers.

The posse was called off the
trail this morning by a phony
message received at Travelers
Rest that Benson had been
caught by Chief Noe in the
Greenville News Building. Sheriff
Rector telephoned a Piedmont
reporter that he would give a re-
ward of $50 for information and
conviction of the person who
phoned the false report to a
citizen at Travelers Rest. This
false alarm, he said, greatly in-
terfered with the search as many
in the posse who gained wind of
the report returned home, believ-
ing that Benson was in custody at
Greenville.

The first information that the
police had gained of the alleged
capture was gleaned from Sheriff
Rector's inquiry. The sheriff said
he was told that a man giving his
name as Burton telephoned the
false report.

Ernest Benson, a married man
aged 34, who was pardoned by Ex-
Governor Blease November 25, 1914,
while serving a sentence of seven
years imprisonment for assault and
battery with intent to kill, this morn-
ing fired a fusillade of bullets at D.
B. Talley and the rector's son, Barn-
ey, in a public road near Travelers
Rest, wounding Mr. Talley in the
back of a leg, while Barney Talley
was shot in each arm.

The shooting occurred about 8:30
o'clock in the main road in front of
J. R. Coleman's house. Preacher
Talley, as he is known because of a
former pastorage he held at Trav-
elers Rest, was riding with his son
in a buggy. Benson, who was walk-
ing, opened fire upon the Talleys
without provocation. He fired five
shots from a 12 calibre pistol. Two
of the bullets went wild while three
pourly aimed shots created flesh
wounds, which, attending physicians
said will not prove serious unless com-
plications set in.

Mr. Talley and his son jumped
from the buggy. Seizing Benson,
he wrenched the smoking revolver
from his hand. Attracted by the
shots Mr. Coleman ran from his
house out into the road. Benson was
bleeding profusely about his head
saving [blurry] struck by one, or both
of the Talleys.

Benson was thought to be seriously
hurt but relieved these fears by run-
ning from his captors. Mr. Coleman
caught him a few minutes later and
carried him to a nearby spring to
bathe his face.

Feigning weakness Benson cleverly
bought enough liberty to escape.
Sheriff Rector and a coterie of depu-
ties followed later in automobiles in
pursuit. The officers were aided in
the search by a posse of Travelers
Rest citizens who are anxious to cap-
ture Benson for fear that he is in-
sane and might do further harm.

The shooting created intense ex-
citement in quiet and peaceful com-
munity. Whether Benson was pro-
voked as a reason for shooting the
Talleys is not known. It was reported
from Travelers Rest this morning
that some difference had previously
existed between the parties about a
fertilizer account and rental.

A prominent physician of that place
said it was the general belief in the
community that Benson was berefit of
[reason?]. Sometime it was thought
that he was insane, supposedly
brought on by extensive drinking.

Benson shot and killed Mr. Burns
at Travelers Rest some years ago. In
the spring of 1912 he shot and wound-
ed C. M. Wing of Greenville, with
whom he had been employed at a rock
quarry. Mr. Wing was shot in the
abdomen, but recovered after several
weeks confinement in the City Hospi-
tal. In the latter case Benson was
sentenced to serve seven years. He
received a parole from Ex-Gov-.
Blaise but all stings attached there-
to were severed by the blanket par-
don [blurry] by the retiring former
governor.

[remainder of column too dark to transcribe]

[column 3]

[advertisement for Cash Feed Co, spans cols. 3-5]

MR. FARMER:

Ask us about Liquid Smoke, the new and best way to cure meat. We Have
the Smoke and Cured Mutton on hand for your inspection.

Phone 2124. CASH FEED COMPANY, River St.
_________________________________________________________________
ANNUAL ELECTION
OF THE OFFICERS
OF ROWENA LODGE

----------o----------
WM. F. ROBERTSON ELECTED
GRAND CHANCELLOR AT K.
OF P. MEETING.

----------o----------
MONTROSE HILL TO ORGANIZE
TALENT FOR DRAMATIC WORK

----------o----------
After the Election of Officers There
Was a General Discussion as to a
Definite Program for the Promo-
tion of the Fraternal Aims of the
Lodge—Newly Elected Officers
Determined to Make 1916 one of
the Most Prosperous Years in the
History of Rowena Lodge

----------o----------
An enthusiastic meeting of Row-
ena Lodge K. of P. was held last
evening, when the annual election of
officers was held. The election re-
sulted in the promottion and election
of the following gentlemen to the
positions named:

Wm. P. Robertson chancellor com-
mander.

P. A. Pressley, vice chancellor.

L. B. Thompson, prelate.

C. D. [Stradley?], master of exche-
quer.

John S. Taylor, master of finance.

W. Marion Pack, master of arms.

C. M. Gaffney, keeper records and
seal.

R. H. Sublett, master of work.

P. R. Kilge, inner guard.

D. E. Mahoffey, outer guard.

A. [E?.] Donaldson, lodge attorney.

W. R. Milford, deputy grand chan-
cellor.

A general discussion followed the
election of officers as to a definite pro-
gram for the promotion of the fra-
ternal aims of the lodge and the
advancement of principles for
[humanity?] represented by the terms
of the great American order.

It was decided to at once inaugu-
rate a team to put on the dramatic
work of the [blurry] and A.
Montrose Hill was assigned the duty
of organizing the best talent in the
lodge to present this magnificent epi-
sode is the story of the friendship of
Damon and Pythias at the initiation
of candidates. There was evidenced
a determination on the part of all
newly elected officers to make 1916
one of the most prosperous years in
the history of this old and respected
lodge, which now numbers about 12[?]
of the prominent citizens of Green-
ville.
--------------------o--------------------
Deposits made in our Dime Savings
Department on or before January 5th
draw interest from January 1st.

Farmers and Merchants Bank.
-------------------o--------------------
COLLEGES ARE CLEAN.
----------o----------
Health Board Finds Clemson and
Winthrop Well Kept.

----------o----------
The cleanliness of the buildings and
grounds of Winthrop and Clemson
is commended in a special report to
the State board of health by a special
committee, consisting of E. A. Hilles,
M. D., of Seneca and D. B. Frontis, M.
D., of Ridge Springs.

The committee praises especially
the plumbing repairs at Winthrop
college, where there is also a new
gymnasium under construction.

At Clemson college the committee
sees danger from the supplementary
water supply and urged that the wa-
ter be submitted to bacteriorogist
analysis as part of the routine.
________________________________
[advertisement for J. A. Bull & Co., spans cols. 3-4, bottom section]

January 1st, 1916 Bargains
And May the Year Be a Prosper-
ous One For You.


10-lb. pail Best Compound Lard $1.10
10- lb. pail Pure Hog Lard 1.20
7 lbs. Good Rio Coffee (Fresh Roast) 1.00
6 lbs. Better Rio Coffee (Fresh Roast) 1.00
5 lbs. Best Rio Coffee (Fresh Roast) 1.00
50 Nice Oranges .60
24 Nice Grape Fruit 1.00
7 Pkgs. Best 10c Macaroni .50
5 lbs. Finest Cream Cheese 1.10
10 lbs. California Peaches .75
10 lbs. Fancy California Peaches .90
10 lbs. Choice Prunes .90
10 lbs. Fancy Prunes 1.00
2 25c pkgs. Nabob Pancake Flour .45
1 gal. Finest Georgia Cane Syrup .60
1 gal. Finest Louisiana Cane Syrup .65
For your New Year and Sunday Dinner we
have Nice Lettuce, Celery, Cranberries, Oysters
and Fresh Tomatoes.

We Thank You Heartily for Your Last Year's
Patronage.

The Best New Year's Resolution that you can
make is: That You Will Buy [blotted] Things
to Nat from-

J. A. BULL & COM.

[column 4]

WORLD WILL SAY
GOOD-BYE TO THE
OLD YEAR TONIGHT

----------o----------
At midnight tonight, the world
will say good-bye to year 1915, and
with the flourish of [trumiphets?]—also
steam whistles—and the clanger of
bells will welcome to "our midst" the
New Year. The passing year has
been very good to Greenville, con-
sidering every thing—there have been
no disasters of consequence, no great
fires and while, of course, conditions
might have been better with some
Greenville as a whole has faired well
in comparison with other larger ci-
ties, and it will not be without a cer-
tain note of regret that Greenville
citizens will hear the death toll of
the old year.

Chief Logan said this morning that
the fire bell will be rung tonight, as
usual, to celebrate the passing of the
old year. As the wheels of time
pass on to the midnight mark, it is
expected also that there will be va-
rious and sundry noises from the
factories, locomotives and other
noise-making instruments within and
around the city, announcing that the
sixteenth child of the Twentieth Cen-
tury is born.

Today, being the last day of the
year, is the day set aside by common
consent for the making of good reso-
ltions—effective tomorrow.
-------------------o--------------------
MRS. BRAMLETTE IMPROVING.

The many firends will be interested
to learn that Mrs. Emma L. Bram-
lette is improving after an operation
for appendicitis.
_____________________________________
[advertisement for Wheeler & Son]

In Sending
Your new year greeting enclose
your portrait. It will be very ap-
propriate. Next thing to a visit.
WHEELER & SON.
_____________________________________
[advertisement for for Bruce & Dester Drug]

PILES! PILES! PILES!
WILLIAMS' PILE OINTMENT

For Blind Bleeding and Itching Piles.
Acts as a poultice, gives relief.
Price 50c and $1.00.

Sold by Brice and Dester Drug Co.
_____________________________________
[advertisement for Barr Bros. Co.]

A
Wilson Heater
will add comfort
to a Home these
cold days.

Prices $13.00,
$16.00, $19.00,
$25.00.

Barr Bros. Co.
223 N. Main St. Phone 688

[column 5]

GORDON MEETINGS
WILL BEGIN HERE
ON JANUARY 9TH

----------o----------
SERIES OF QUIET TALKS BY
EMINENT LECTURER SE-
CURED BY UNION.

----------o----------
DENOMINATIONS UNITE
FOR WEEK OF PRAYER

----------o----------
S. D. Gordon will Open the Series of
Meetings With a Service in the
First Baptist Church Sunday
Morning, the 9th, and will Ad-
Dress a Union Meeting That Night
at First Presbyterian Church—
Schools and Colleges Asked to Per-
mit Students to Attend

----------o----------
(Contribued)

The Gordon meetings will begin on
the 9th of January and close on the
13th. Mr. Gordon was invited by the
Ministers' Union to give us a series
of "Quiet Talks," the chief purpose
being, under God's gracious blessing,
so to touch the Christian people as
shall lead to fresh, true conserva-
tion of life, to better prayer and Bible
study, and so to soul-winning through
the year. But the messages are
shaped for all chuch members and
non-church members.

Mr. Gordon will speak in the First
Baptist church Sunday morning, the
9th of January, and address a union
meeting in the First Presbyterian
church that night. On the following
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday afternoons, he will speak in
the St. Paul's Methodist church; and
the same nights in the First Presby-
terian church. Both churches are on
the street car lines and are commo-
dious.

The committee of arrangements
earnestly requests all the ministers
of the city and community, all the
superintendents and teachers in our
Sunday schools and the secretaries of
our Y. M. C. A. associations to an-
nounce the meetings next Sunday;
and invite all to attend both the af-
ternoon and night meetings. The fac-
ulties of our colleges and schools and
all the students are cordially invited.
It will be a rare privilege to hear
such a man of deep spirituality and
world-wide reputation.

The singing is to be led by the
choirs or presentors of the churches
in which the meetings are to be held
and so special music is to be [blurry]
eal, except what is usual! The books
used in these churches will be used
during the meetings.

No collections will be taken at any
of the meetings, except Sunday night
January 9th, and Thursday night, the
13th. The offering on Sunday night
will be used to meet the expenses of
the meeting and the collection of
Thursday night will be purely a vol-
untary one to pay Mr. Gordon for his
services. Mr. T. O. Lawton, Mr. A. J.
Graham, Mr. W. C. Beacham and Mr.
W. F. Robinson have been appoint-
ed the committee on finance to re-
ceive and disburse all funds connect-
ed with the meetings. The only ob-
ligation will be the traveling expenses
and the entertainment of Mr. and
Mrs. Gordon, the necessary printing
and other incidentals. The collections
will be taken without pressure.

Mr. Gordon writes the committee
that the atmosphere of the meetings
and the deep, permanent results de-
pend to an incalcuable degree, on
prayer. In addition to prayer in the
pulpit and prayer meetings, if these
simple meetings could be laid on the
hearts of individuals who really be-
lieve in prayer, and who will make
special repeated prayer in private,
and if still further, it be practicable to
have special prayer meetings in indi-
vidual churces, or union church
prayer meetings, and in homes, it will
make an enormous difference in re-
sults.
-------------------o--------------------
SANTA CLAUS AT
CITIDEL TONIGHT

----------o----------
According to advices received
from Salvation army headquarters,
they are prepared to bring a belated
Christmas to nearly 450 of Green-
ville's little tots. As the weather is
good, the hall will be filled to over-
flowing with youngsters who
will be present to greet Santa when
he makes his appearance at the bot-
tom of the chimney, erected special-
ly for him.

Certain it is that anticipation will
be written in letters a fact, high
across the faces of the youngsters
present at the Christmas celebration.
Two trees have been decorated and
prepared for the children by Adju-
tant Crook and his staff of able as-
sitants.

Candy, fruit, toys and other Yule-
tide goodies [blurry] have been fixed
up for the occasion and every at-
tempt will be made to see that no
child leaves the hall without having
received some of the joys of Christ-
mas.

The time for the beginning of the
celebration is set for 7:30 so that the
children may get home before it be-
comes too late.
_____________________________________
[notice of bankruptcy, spans cols. 5-7, bottom section]

NOTICE!
Tommorow Last Day of the Bankrupt Sale at

[too dark to transcribe]
[cut off]

[columns 6-7]

[advertisement for Sullivan-Markley Hardware]

[image of stalk cutter]
The Kingman Stalk Cut[ter]

We have a car load of these in 7, 8 and 9 inch blades. [cut off]
stalk cutter made. Buy one now. Sold by

SULLIVAN MARKLEY HARDWARE [CO.]
"Greater Greenville's Greatest Hardware S[tore"]

113 [S.?] Main St. Phones 77 [and cut off]
_____________________________________
[advertisement for Plaza Cafe]

Dine At The Place
Where you are assured of ge[tting]
nothing but the best, at reason[able]
prices.

PLAZA CAFE
The Homelike Cafe.

_____________________________________
[advertisement for Western Union]

DELIVERY
GUARANTEED

TO
DAILY PIEDMONT
SUBSCRIBERS

The Piedmont has completed arrangements with the
WESTERN UNION
Telegraph Co.

Whereby the PIEDMONT is able to GUARANTEE DELIVE[RY]
EVERY NIGHT to carrier subscribers in all parts of Greenv[ille]
and [illegible].

No regular subscriber of the PIEDMONT ever need to miss [cut off]
[one?] copy. If the carrier boy misses you, just call up on [the]
telephone.

230

And tell them your Piedmont did not come. Tha[t is]
all you need to do. A Western Union messenger boy will rush [your]
copy of the Piedmont to you at once. THERE IS NO CHAR[GE]
for THIS SERVICE. It is purely in line with the policy of [The]
PIEDMONT TO SERVE THE PUBLIC TO THE BEST OF IT[S]
ABILITY AT ALL TIMES AND IN ALL WAYS. THE PIE[D-]
MONT PAYS THE BILL.

The Point is that you want to have your Piedmont eve[ry]
night in the week and we [insist?] that you shall have it. In ord[er]
to guarantee delivery we have adopted this method.

Call Daily Piedmont. Phone 230. The business office is op[en]
until 7:30 and you complaint will receive prompt attention.

Phone 230
_____________________________________
[advertisement for Farmers and Merchants Bank]

BIG CHRISTMAS
SAVINGS WEEK

Beginning Monday, January 3rd, the Farmers a[nd]
Merchants Bank expects to start its big week [of]
Christmas Savings. Everybody is invited to jo[in]
during this week. You will be much pleased wi[th]
the system operated by this bank and enjoy t[he]
Christmas spirit all the year round. Make yo[ur]
Christmas a merry one. Join at once.

FARMS AND MERCHANTS BANK,
State Depository
GREENVILLE, S. C.

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