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Greenville County Library System at May 11, 2023 07:55 PM

gcls_SN_018c

September 6, 1945 The Slater News Page Three

Preparation Department
N-E-W-S
[title spans columns 1 and 2]

[column 1]

Jessie Stanley, Lake Hend-
ricks and Lena Crisco, all of
Greensboro, N. C., were the
Week-end guests of Mildred
and Margaret Mull. Ghey all
enjoyed an outing at Table
Rock State Park

J. C. Jones, S-2/C, is expect-
ed home on a week-end pass
from Camp Peary, Va. J. C.
is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Clyde Jones of Marietta.

Mary Elizabeth Williams
and family were dinner guests
of Ola Chapman of Anderson,
S.C.

Geraldine Raxter of Bre-
vard, N. C. was the dinner
guest of Alma Capps on Sun-
day.

Warrie A. Chastain, S-1/C,
was home on a six day leave
while his ship, the Lake Cham-
plain, was in dock. His brother,
Artis, is now leaving for
foreign duty.

Davis Batson and Baccus
Poole recently enjoyed a trip
to Nashville, Tenn. While there,

[article continues to column 2]

they attended the "Grand Old
Opra."

Little Dale McWhite, of
Slater, spent several days last
week with his grandmother,
Mrs. H. W. Childs, of Green-
ville.

Mrs. J. C. Campbell, of Shel-
by, is spending several weeks
with her daughters, Mrs. Bes-
sie Robinson and Miss Ruth
Campbell, of Slater.

Mrs. Mary Phillips and
Dwight, and Mr. and Mrs.
George Parden and son, Jim-
mie, were recent visitors of Mr.
and Mrs. Billie Phillips.

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Bridges,
of Greer, were recent visitors
in the home of Mrs. Bessie Rob-
inson. Mr. and Mrs. Bridges
were formerly employed in the
Preperation Department of our
plant.

Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Griffin,
of Greenville, are the parents
of a son born Monday, August
13. Both Mr. and Mrs. Griffin
were formerly employed in
our plant. Mrs. Griffin is a
sister of Mrs. Fred Childs.

[return to column 1]

Good Attitude Is
(con't. from page 1, col. 5)

grow shorter, that your occu-
pation will grow increasingly
more interesting, and that your
new mental outlook on life will
bring you much happiness both
at home and at work.

These years of high pressure
war production have made all
of us irritable and moody at
times. Long hours of overtime
and a lessening of our leisure
hours have made us susceptible
to periodic petty jealousies and
imaginings of wrongs inflicted
upon us. But there's a cure for
every ill, and the best thing to
do, if you're suffering from
jangled nerves, is to go about
your work with the idea of im-
proving its quality and with a
firm resolution to do the job to
the very best of your ability.

Probably the best possible
illustration of the correct men-
tal attitude a man should have
toward his job is embodied in
the following story: Three men
were toiling side by side, lay-
ing brick. A curious bystander
inquired as to what they were
doing. The first man replied,
"I am laying brick." The
second man answered, "I am
earning five dollars a day."
But the third man proudly ex-
claimed, "I am building a
cathedral."

So, whatever your occupa-
tion, take a deep personal in-
terest in it and do it well. Bear
in mind that you are not just
finishing a machine part, but
actually building a definite
product. No matter what your
work, it is creative and worthy
of your best efforts. Make your
motto" "Work to live" and not
"Live to work!"

Anyboday, providing he
knows how to be amusing, has
the right to talk about him-
self. - Baudelaire

Advice is seldom welcome;
and those who want it the most
always like it the least. - Ches-
terfield

A college education never
hurt anyone who was willing to
learn something afterwards.

[middle of column 2]

Old Cemeteries Reveal
Many Strange Epitaphs

Here lies the body of our Anna
Done to death by a banana.
It wasn't the fruit that laid her
low
But the skin of the thing that
made her go.
Enosburg, Vt.

Beneath this stone, a lump of
clay,
Lies Arabella Young,
Who on the 21st of May
Began to hold her Tongue
Hatfield, Mass., 1771

Here lies, cut down like unripe
fruit,
The wife of Deacon Amos
Shute,

[continues to middle of column 3]

She died of drinking too much
coffee
Anno Domini, eighteen forty.
Canaan, N.H.

Beneath this stone, a lump of
clay,
Lies Uncle Peter Daniels,
Who too early in the month of
May
Took off his winter flannels.
Burlington, Vt.

[column 3]

Theatre Guide

Sept. 7, 1945
"G-I HONEYMOON"
Starring:
Gale Storm
Peter Cookson
Frank Jenks

Sept. 8, 1945
"DELLINGER"
Staring:
Lawrence Tierney
Edmond Lowe
Anne Jeffereys

Sept. 10, 1945
"IT'S A PLEASURE"
Starring:
Sonja Henie
Michael O'Shea
Bill Johnson

Sept. 14, 1945
"SUNDAY DINNER FOR
A SOLDIER"
Starring:
Anne Baxter
John Hodiak
Charles Winninger

Sept. 15, 1945
"HITCH-HIKE TO
HAPPINESS"
Starring:
Al Pearce
Dale Evans

Sept. 17, 1945
"ROUGHLY SPEAKING"
Starring:
Rosalind Russell
Jack Carson
Robert Hutton

[column 4]

LINES FROM
THE LIBRARY

"Dreams, books, are eacha
world; and books, we know
Are a substantial world, both
pure and good.
Round these, with tendrils
strong as flesh and blood,
Our pastime and our happiness
will grow."
Ibid, Sonnet 3

"This Too Shall Pass" - The
very short article by this title
is written by Charles B. Roth,
and appears in your "Life"
magazine for August, 1945.
Those who are inclined to wor-
ry when misfortune, failure and
disappointment strike would do
well to read the encouraging
and comforting philosophy set
forth by Mr. Roth.

Tea, Made With Saccharin
- So many people are saying
that they do not care for tea
which has been sweetened with
saccharin. We agree that the
right proportions of each in-
gredient must be used if the
tea is to taste just right. For
good tea, try the following
recipe:
Brew hot tea, using 3 tea
bags (or 3 teasp. tea) to 1/2
gal. boiling water. Let stand
until as strong as desired; tea
must not be allowed to boil.
When the tea is of the proper
strength, remove tea bags, add-
ing 5 or 6 whole grain sac-
charin tablets. People who like
tea extra sweet will need 6
tablets, rather than 5. Add sac-
charin while tea is still hot so
that tablets will dissolve quick-
ly. If added after the tea has
cooled, dissolve saccharin in
hot water. To avoid the bitter
taste so often found in tea
sweetened with saccharin,
place tea in the refridgerator
and allow to stand uncovered
for several hours before using.

"A true friend is one who

[article continues in middle of column 5]

likes us in spite of our achieve-
ments." - Anon - "Woman's
Home Companion," August, 1945.

Have you thought much a-
bout the prefabricated houses
which can be purchased com=
[lete in package form and de-
livered to you by truck after
the war? It's an interesting
idea; read about such houses
in an article called "Your
Solar Home Is All Wrapped
Up," featured in "Popular Me-
chanics," August, 1945.

Et Cetera - "The dropping
of 'etc.' from the language
would necessitate a lot of think-
ing that is not being done at
present."
Wellman L. France,
"Saturday Evening Post,"
August 11, 1945.

[top of column 5]

Local News

Mrs. Ola Johnson went to
Memphis, Tenn. recently to
visit her brother, Private H. Lan-
ford Lindsey, who was a pa-
tient in U. S. General Hospital
recovering from wounds re-
cieved overseas. Private Lindsey
has since recieved a medical
discharge and is expected to
visit in Slater soon.

Psier B. Vickers, Gunners
Mate 3/C, has been given a
medical discharge from the U.
S. Navy and is now home with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. J. Vickers.

Private Calvin Huffman is home
on a thirty day furlough with
his parents and family. Calvin
has been overseas in the Euro-
pean theatre of war for one
year.

"Sambo" Knoght has com-
pleted his basic naval training
at Bainbridge, Maryland, and
is now home with his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. E.J. Knight, be-
fore being assigned to active
duties.

[large advertisement covers bottom half of columns 2, 3, 4 &5]
SPECIALS
Let Us Help You Save On Your Drug Needs

















"Rex" Compacts
$1.50 to $5.00
plus tax
Johnson's
50c Baby Oil .... 45c
50c Talc Powder . 45c

plus tax
Sal Hepatica
30c size ....... 25c
60c size ....... 50c
Billfolds
Ladies & Gents
$1.00 to $5.00
plus tax
Fletcher's Castoria
40c size ....... 35c
---------------
Triena
30c size ....... 25c
Alka Seltzer
30c size ....... 25c
60c size ....... 50c
Sutton's Power Mitt
69c to $1.00
plus tax
Philips Milk Mag.
25c size ....... 21c
50c size ....... 39c
Alcohol - 70%
Rubbing Compound
Special Pt. ..... 24c
Jergen's Lotion
$1.00 size ...... 79c
Lydia E. Pinkham's
Veg. Comp.
$1.50 size .... $1.19
Vim Herb
$1.00 size ...... 98c

"We fill any Doctor's Prescription"
Community Drug Store Slater S. C.

gcls_SN_018c

September 6, 1945 The Slater News Page Three

Preparation Department
N-E-W-S
[title spans columns 1 and 2]

Jessie Stanley, Lake Hend-
ricks and Lena Crisco, all of
Greensboro, N. C., were the
Week-end guests of Mildred
and Margaret Mull. Ghey all
enjoyed an outing at Table
Rock State Park

J. C. Jones, S-2/C, is expect-
ed home on a week-end pass
from Camp Peary, Va. J. C.
is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Clyde Jones of Marietta.

Mary Elizabeth Williams
and family were dinner guests
of Ola Chapman of Anderson,
S.C.

Geraldine Raxter of Bre-
vard, N. C. was the dinner
guest of Alma Capps on Sun-
day.

Warrie A. Chastain, S-1/C,
was home on a six day leave
while his ship, the Lake Cham-
plain, was in dock. His brother,
Artis, is now leaving for
foreign duty.

Davis Batson and Baccus
Poole recently enjoyed a trip
to Nashville, Tenn. While there,

[article continues to column 2]

they attended the "Grand Old
Opra."

Little Dale McWhite, of
Slater, spent several days last
week with his grandmother,
Mrs. H. W. Childs, of Green-
ville

Mrs. J. C. Campbell, of Shel-
by, is spending several weeks
with her daughters, Mrs. Bes-
sie Robinson and Miss Ruth
Campbell, of Slater.

Mrs. Mary Phillips and
Dwight, and Mr. and Mrs.
George Parden and son, Jim-
mie, were recent visitors of Mr.
and Mrs. Billie Phillips.

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Bridges,
of Greer, were recent visitors
in the home of Mrs. Bessie Rob-
inson. Mr. and Mrs. Bridges
were formerly employed in the
Preperation Department of our
plant.

Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Griffin,
of Greenville, are the parents
of a son born Monday, August
13. Both Mr. and Mrs. Griffin
were formerly employed in
our plant. Mrs. Griffin is a
sister of Mrs. Fred Childs.

[return to column 1]

Good Attitude Is
(con't. from page 1, col. 5)

grow shorter, that your occu-
pation will grow increasingly
more interesting, and that your
new mental outlook on life will
bring you much happiness both
at home and at work.

These years of high pressure
war production have made all
of us irritable and moody at
times. Long hours of overtime
and a lessening of our leisure
hours have made us susceptible
to periodic petty jealousies and
imaginings of wrongs inflicted
upon us. But there's a cure for
every ill, and the best thing to
do, if you're suffering from
jangled nerves, is to go about
your work with the idea of im-
proving its quality and with a
firm resolution to do the job to
the very best of your ability.

Probably the best possible
illustration of the correct men-
tal attitude a man should have
toward his job is embodied in
the following story: Three men
were toiling side by side, lay-
ing brick. A curious bystander
inquired as to what they were
doing. The first man replied,
"I am laying brick." The
second man answered, "I am
earning five dollars a day."
But the third man proudly ex-
claimed, "I am building a
cathedral."

So, whatever your occupa-
tion, take a deep personal in-
terest in it and do it well. Bear
in mind that you are not just
finishing a machine part, but
actually building a definite
product. No matter what your
work, it is creative and worthy
of your best efforts. Make your
motto" "Work to live" and not
"Live to work!"

Anyboday, providing he
knows how to be amusing, has
the right to talk about him-
self. - Baudelaire

Advice is seldom welcome;
and those who want it the most
always like it the least. - Ches-
terfield

A college education never
hurt anyone who was willing to
learn something afterwards.

[middle of column 2]

Old Cemeteries Reveal
Many Strange Epitaphs

Here lies the body of our Anna
Done to death by a banana.
It wasn't the fruit that laid her
low
But the skin of the thing that
made her go.
Enosburg, Vt.

Beneath this stone, a lump of
clay,
Lies Arabella Young,
Whoe on the 21st of May
Began to hold her Tongue
Hatfield, Mass., 1771

Here lies, cut down like unripe
fruit,
The wife of Deacon Amos
Shute,

[continues to middle of column 3]

She died of drinking too much
coffee
Anno Domini, eighteen forty.
Canaan, N.H.

Beneath this stone, a lump of
clay,
Lies Uncle Peter Daniels,
Who too early in the month of
May
Took off his winter flannels.
Burlington, Vt.

[column 3]

Theatre Guide

Sept. 7, 1945
"G-I HONEYMOON"
Starring:
Gale Storm
Peter Cookson
Frank Jenks

Sept. 8, 1945
"DELLINGER"
Staring:
Lawrence Tierney
Edmond Lowe
Anne Jeffereys

Sept. 10, 1945
"IT'S A PLEASURE"
Starring:
Sonja Henie
Michael O'Shea
Bill Johnson

Sept. 14, 1945
"SUNDAY DINNER FOR
A SOLDIER"
Starring:
Anne Baxter
John Hodiak
Charles Winninger

Sept. 15, 1945
"HITCH-HIKE TO
HAPPINESS"
Starring:
Al Pearce
Dale Evans

Sept. 17, 1945
"ROUGHLY SPEAKING"
Starring:
Rosalind Russell
Jack Carson
Robert Hutton

[column 4]

LINES FROM
THE LIBRARY

"Dreams, books, are eacha
world; and books, we know
Are a substantial world, both
pure and good.
Round these, with tendrils
strong as flesh and blood,
Our pastime and our happiness
will grow."
Ibid, Sonnet 3

"This Too Shall Pass" - The
very short article by this title
is written by Charles B. Roth,
and appears in your "Life"
magazine for August, 1945.
Those who are inclined to wor-
ry when misfortune, failure and
disappointment strike would do
well to read the encouraging
and comforting philosophy set
forth by Mr. Roth.

Tea, Made With Saccharin
- So many people are saying
that they do not care for tea
which has been sweetened with
saccharin. We agree that the
right proportions of each in-
gredient must be used if the
tea is to taste just right. For
good tea, try the following
recipe:
Brew hot tea, using 3 tea
bags (or 3 teasp. tea) to 1/2
gal. boiling water. Let stand
until as strong as desired; tea
must not be allowed to boil.
When the tea is of the proper
strength, remove tea bags, add-
ing 5 or 6 whole grain sac-
charin tablets. People who like
tea extra sweet will need 6
tablets, rather than 5. Add sac-
charin while tea is still hot so
that tablets will dissolve quick-
ly. If added after the tea has
cooled, dissolve saccharin in
hot water. To avoid the bitter
taste so often found in tea
sweetened with saccharin,
place tea in the refridgerator
and allow to stand uncovered
for several hours before using.

"A true friend is one who

[article continues in middle of column 5]

likes us in spite of our achieve-
ments." - Anon - "Woman's
Home Companion," August, 1945.

Have you thought much a-
bout the prefabricated houses
which can be purchased com=
[lete in package form and de-
livered to you by truck after
the war? It's an interesting
idea; read about such houses
in an article called "Your
Solar Home Is All Wrapped
Up," featured in "Popular Me-
chanics," August, 1945.

Et Cetera - "The dropping
of 'etc.' from the language
would necessitate a lot of think-
ing that is not being done at
present."
Wellman L. France,
"Saturday Evening Post,"
August 11, 1945.

[top of column 5]

Local News

Mrs. Ola Johnson went to
Memphis, Tenn. recently to
visit her brother, Private H. Lan-
ford Lindsey, who was a pa-
tient in U. S. General Hospital
recovering from wounds re-
cieved overseas. Private Lindsey
has since recieved a medical
discharge and is expected to
visit in Slater soon.

Psier B. Vickers, Gunners
Mate 3/C, has been given a
medical discharge from the U.
S. Navy and is now home with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. J. Vickers.

Private Calvin Huffman is home
on a thirty day furlough with
his parents and family. Calvin
has been overseas in the Euro-
pean theatre of war for one
year.

"Sambo" Knoght has com-
pleted his basic naval training
at Bainbridge, Maryland, and
is now home with his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. E.J. Knight, be-
fore being assigned to active
duties.

[large advertisement covers bottom half of columns 2, 3, 4 &5]
SPECIALS
Let Us Help You Save On Your Drug Needs

















"Rex" Compacts
$1.50 to $5.00
plus tax
Johnson's
50c Baby Oil .... 45c
50c Talc Powder . 45c

plus tax
Sal Hepatica
30c size ....... 25c
60c size ....... 50c
Billfolds
Ladies & Gents
$1.00 to $5.00
plus tax
Fletcher's Castoria
40c size ....... 35c
---------------
Triena
30c size ....... 25c
Alka Seltzer
30c size ....... 25c
60c size ....... 50c
Sutton's Power Mitt
69c to $1.00
plus tax
Philips Milk Mag.
25c size ....... 21c
50c size ....... 39c
Alcohol - 70%
Rubbing Compound
Special Pt. ..... 24c
Jergen's Lotion
$1.00 size ...... 79c
Lydia E. Pinkham's
Veg. Comp.
$1.50 size .... $1.19
Vim Herb
$1.00 size ...... 98c

"We fill any Doctor's Prescription"
Community Drug Store Slater S. C.